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Author Topic: All about 120 film  (Read 1854 times)
iloveindiemusic
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« on: August 04, 2011, 06:26:55 AM »
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Hello,

I am very new to medium format shooting as well as processing 120 film.
If someone could be so kind to answer some of my questions, I would be very grateful!

* After shooting my 120 film, how can I develop it? Can I just process it and scan the
negatives, through a scanner made for negatives? Where do I go from there?

*when I look at online labs, they mention, cut and sleeved, Or mounted or unmounted.

Basically, I just want to scan my color 120 film after being processed  and develop it on my own? Is that possible?

* what is your film processing break down?

Thanks everyone!
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k bennett
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« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2011, 07:00:25 AM »
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You can process color film in your own darkroom with the proper equipment and chemistry. It's something of a pain, though, and most people send it out to a lab to be developed. I would ask for mine uncut and sleeved, so I got the entire roll in a long plastic sleeve, then I would cut it to fit plastic negative pages. There may still be a lab in your area than has a color negative processor that will handle 120 film -- ask around.

You can scan film on a flatbed scanner with a transparency module. Most of them come with a holder for different sizes of film. Be forewarned, scanning MF film can be technically challenging if you are a perfectionist.
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iloveindiemusic
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2011, 01:32:37 AM »
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Thanks for the reply and info. Can you recommend a scanner? I looked at the canoscan 9000f and the canon v600 or v700. Which one do you think is good?
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2011, 03:15:37 AM »
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I work with a Mamiya Universal camera and develop B/W for  myself, but only because I use a high resolution film no lab develops.
Color (Portra and Ektar usually), T-Max and other standard B/W films I give to the lab.
Scanning: Nikon Coolscan LS-9000: Best non-Drum scanner. Still expensive. Scanning software: Silverfast.
Honestly: Its a royal pain in the rear. Use film only if you really like the look of it, otherwise digital.

Cheers
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2011, 10:47:04 AM »
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Hi,

I don't use film anymore but used to use Velvia. The scanner I used mostly was a Minolta Dimage Scan Multi Pro with Vuescan.

Here are some of my old, film based images: http://echophoto.smugmug.com/Travel/Sextener-Dolomiten/

Agree with Christoph on the usability issue.

Best regards
Erik

I work with a Mamiya Universal camera and develop B/W for  myself, but only because I use a high resolution film no lab develops.
Color (Portra and Ektar usually), T-Max and other standard B/W films I give to the lab.
Scanning: Nikon Coolscan LS-9000: Best non-Drum scanner. Still expensive. Scanning software: Silverfast.
Honestly: Its a royal pain in the rear. Use film only if you really like the look of it, otherwise digital.

Cheers
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