Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Flower macros from Royal Botanical Gardens  (Read 1990 times)
John R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1013


« on: August 15, 2011, 09:12:21 PM »
ReplyReply

Went out with a group from the camera club when Roses were in their prime in late June of this year. Shot some and a few other flowers. As far as I am concerned, macro work is about the hardest kind of photography I have yet to try. It's all work and very difficult to see properly through those extenders!

JMR
1- slightly cropped and desaturated


2


3


4
Logged
kikashi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3681



« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2011, 02:27:40 AM »
ReplyReply

Very pretty, John, particularly the first and the third. What kit were you using?

Jeremy
Logged
JohnKoerner
Guest
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2011, 05:10:26 AM »
ReplyReply

Went out with a group from the camera club when Roses were in their prime in late June of this year. Shot some and a few other flowers. As far as I am concerned, macro work is about the hardest kind of photography I have yet to try. It's all work and very difficult to see properly through those extenders!


People underestimate how hard macro photography is! The slightest movement of the camera can be half the body length of a tiny creature or flower!

For that reason, especially since you're working with inanimate subjects like flowers, I recommend not looking through your viewfinder at all, and using Live View and a tripod instead. Really helps in composing your shots at 1x, and then (once composed) in really nailing your focus with the key areas of the subject blown-up 10x closer on your screen for careful scrutiny ...

That said, I think all of your images turned out delightful Grin

Jack

.
Logged
Chairman Bill
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1372


« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2011, 05:54:56 AM »
ReplyReply

I'd love to see the images. Unfortunately, I can see nothing
Logged
francois
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6443


« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2011, 06:25:56 AM »
ReplyReply

The third is my favorite but the three others are gorgeous also.
It's a nice job!
Logged

Francois
Cannes
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 20


« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2011, 09:34:50 AM »
ReplyReply

good job! I love the second, which lens you use?
Logged
Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1861


WWW
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2011, 09:59:47 AM »
ReplyReply

Delicious work!

You gotta start doing shows and then in your leisure time write a book on how you developed these mar-vhe-lous techniques!

We visited a couple of resort towns on the Oregon coast last weekend. The towns had a lot of art galleries, but nothing there matched the eye candy nature of your work.
Logged

John R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1013


« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2011, 04:43:39 PM »
ReplyReply

Very pretty, John, particularly the first and the third. What kit were you using?

Jeremy
Thanks for the comments. I use a K5 Pentax with 100 mm Nikon attached with an adapter I bought on Ebay. And an extender, but I can't recall which one I used. Very difficult on the eyes and only about ten per cent of images were focused where I intended. So I am learning to use live view and hope that will help. In the end, I will likely buy a Tamron ir Pentax mcro lens. Just too hard on the eyes!
Logged
John R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1013


« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2011, 04:46:01 PM »
ReplyReply


People underestimate how hard macro photography is! The slightest movement of the camera can be half the body length of a tiny creature or flower!

For that reason, especially since you're working with inanimate subjects like flowers, I recommend not looking through your viewfinder at all, and using Live View and a tripod instead. Really helps in composing your shots at 1x, and then (once composed) in really nailing your focus with the key areas of the subject blown-up 10x closer on your screen for careful scrutiny ...

That said, I think all of your images turned out delightful Grin

Jack

.
Thanks for the comments John. I am going to start using Live View, which I thought was for video!

JMR
Logged
John R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1013


« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2011, 04:50:26 PM »
ReplyReply

Thank you Justan, Francois, and Cannes. Bill, I don't know what to say and have no idea why you cannot see the images.

JMR
Logged
Chairman Bill
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1372


« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2011, 05:31:58 PM »
ReplyReply

I can see them now. Had to empty my cache, delete cookies, log-in again, et voila! Very nice flower photies, BTW.
Logged
louoates
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 678



WWW
« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2011, 07:28:36 PM »
ReplyReply

Love #1 and #3 because both are a bit farther from another flower shot. I love to see taking the original photograph and moving toward a more painterly treatment without the obvious filter effects so often seen. Well done.
Logged
Jose L
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 56

"He detenido la luz, he capturado su vuelo" Louis


« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2011, 01:00:04 PM »
ReplyReply

Para nada subestimo la fotografía macro. Hay que "saber ver" para extraer estos pequeños pedazos de realidad. En tus fotografías me gusta la luz, suave. La definición, muy buena. Y el tratamiento del color, muy correcto. Enhorabuena.
Logged
John R
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1013


« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2011, 08:25:35 PM »
ReplyReply

Love #1 and #3 because both are a bit farther from another flower shot. I love to see taking the original photograph and moving toward a more painterly treatment without the obvious filter effects so often seen. Well done.
Thank you Bill and Jose L. Louoates, thanks and that is exactly what I am leaning to more and more. But really, I have no issues with modest and tasteful use of filters.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad