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Author Topic: 2011 FLORIDA JUMPING SPIDERS  (Read 2049 times)
JohnKoerner
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« on: August 22, 2011, 08:09:55 PM »
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CARDINAL JUMPING SPIDER (Subadult)
(Phidippus cardinalis)
Canon EOS 7D | Canon MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1x-5x MacroPhoto
Single Image | 1/250 | f/13 | ISO 100
MT-24 EX TwinLight Flash | Tripod




CARDINAL JUMPING SPIDER (Juvenile)
(Phidippus cardinalis)
Canon EOS 7D | Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L Macro Lens
Single Image | 1/4 | f/9 | ISO 320
Natural Light | Tripod | Manual Focus | Remote Switch




OCALA JUMPING SPIDER (Female)
(Tutelina ocala)
A new species I helped discover
Canon EOS 7D | Canon MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1x-5x MacroPhoto
Single Image | 1/250 | f/13 | ISO 100
MT-24 EX TwinLight Flash | Tripod




BARK JUMPING SPIDER (Male)
(Platycryptus undatus)
Canon EOS 7D | Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L Macro Lens
Single Image | 1/60 | f/10 | ISO 640
Natural Light | Tripod | Manual Focus | Remote Switch




PALE HENTZ JUMPING SPIDER (Male)
(Hentzia mitrata)
Canon EOS 7D | Canon MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1x-5x MacroPhoto
Single Image | 1/250 | f/13 | ISO 100
MT-24 EX TwinLight Flash | Tripod




RICHMAN'S JUMPING SPIDER (Male)
(Phidippus richmani)
Canon EOS 7D | Canon MP-E 65mm f/2.8 1x-5x MacroPhoto
Single Image | 1/250 | f/14 | ISO 100
MT-24 EX TwinLight Flash | Tripod




BLACK & RED JUMPING SPIDER (Female)
(Phidippus clarus)
Canon EOS 7D | Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L Macro Lens
Single Image | 1/6 | f/10 | ISO 640
Natural Light | Tripod | Manual Focus | Remote Switch


Florida has some pretty cool jumpers too ...

Jack

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sailronin
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2011, 08:54:59 PM »
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Beautiful series, great work.
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Thank you for looking, comments and critiques are always welcome.
Dave

http://sailronin.smugmug.com
JohnKoerner
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2011, 09:53:53 PM »
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Thank you sir!


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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2011, 10:56:30 PM »
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Fantastic photos, Jack. When your book comes out, let us know. I'll buy a copy.

Eric
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

http://myrvaagnes.com  Visit my website. New images each season.
wolfnowl
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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2011, 01:16:54 AM »
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Great stuff, Jack.  Whomever your entomologist friend is, his colleagues are going to be very jealous...

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
Justan
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« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2011, 08:48:21 AM »
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Beautiful work! Do the jumping spiders have 6 eyes? Is this number of eyes unusual for a spider? Also, I know this sounds like the lead in for a gag, but  how do you tell the difference between male and female spiders?
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2011, 11:26:09 AM »
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Fantastic photos, Jack. When your book comes out, let us know. I'll buy a copy.
Eric

Thank you very much, Eric, that means alot!




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Great stuff, Jack.  Whomever your entomologist friend is, his colleagues are going to be very jealous...
Mike.

LOL, thanks Mike.

Actually, they are pretty good guys also, and I may be doing some photography of their insect specimens as well, for the new museum website being discussed.




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Beautiful work! Do the jumping spiders have 6 eyes? Is this number of eyes unusual for a spider? Also, I know this sounds like the lead in for a gag, but  how do you tell the difference between male and female spiders?

Thank you Justan.

Actually, spiders have 8 eyes ... and it is a very good question about "how to tell" the sex on spiders. With some species, you can immediately tell by color/pattern/size. With others that otherwise look the same, however, you have to tell by the "palps." The palps are located between the fangs and the lead set of legs. Both males and females have palps, but the female's are thin whereas the male's are "swollen" at the ends. The reason the male's palps are swollen at the ends is because he actually inseminates a female with them. The male first spins a "sperm web," then deposits his semen on it, and then absorbs the semen with his palps ... which he then carries over to the female to inseminate her. (Spiders do not have penis/vagina sex organs; they reproduce by the male inserting his sperm-soaked palps into her.) For example:


Arrows indicate male's swollen palps

The male Striped Lynx above has very pronounced "swollen palps" to identify his sex. Meanwhile, the Florida Lynx (below) is clearly female because she does NOT have swollen palps:


No swollen palps ...

Although there are no arrows, the palps of spiders are pretty obvious, and that is the usual means of sexing them (males are swollen at the end, females are not). In some species, the swelling is not as obvious as in Lynxes, but a discerning eye can sex most species of spiders at a glance, once he knows what to look for.

Hope this clarifies!

Jack


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Justan
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« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2011, 11:52:27 AM »
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They have eight eyes? On the male Striped Lynx I think I can see 6 on the top with 2 smaller ones front and below. Is that correct? On the Cardinal jumping spider I can see 8. So the eyes are different sized and the eye location changes between sub-species.

Their ability to process and organize visual data must be as amazing as their ability to make webs and largely defy gravity. All in such a small package.

Thanks for explaining about how to identify a male spiders palps. I didnít know about that, nor anything about the spiders reproductive bits. Truly fascinating and opens the door to a number of questions about their anatomy and other behaviors.

Thanks for the reply!
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JohnKoerner
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« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2011, 12:15:04 PM »
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They have eight eyes? On the male Striped Lynx I think I can see 6 on the top with 2 smaller ones front and below. Is that correct? On the Cardinal jumping spider I can see 8. So the eyes are different sized and the eye location changes between sub-species.

Yes, exactly.

You're a natural Justan. In point of fact, "eye arrangement" and "genital shape" are *the* determining factors of species/subspecies classification.




Their ability to process and organize visual data must be as amazing as their ability to make webs and largely defy gravity. All in such a small package.

LOL, I actually call their carapace (head) their "command center" ... since they are receiving and processing visual data from all angles Grin




Thanks for explaining about how to identify a male spiders palps. I didnít know about that, nor anything about the spiders reproductive bits. Truly fascinating and opens the door to a number of questions about their anatomy and other behaviors.
Thanks for the reply!

My pleasure Justan, and thank you for being interested enough to ask Smiley

Spiders are truly fascinating creatures, and jumpers in particular seem to be almost "intelligent." They generally attack their prey based on its weapons. For example, they will attack other spiders "from behind" (to avoid their front-located fangs) ... but they will attack bees/wasps "from the front" (to avoid their rear-located stingers).

Male jumpers put on elaborate "dancing displays" for the females, and will even bring them "fresh kills" to appease them/win them over. They are really quite interesting, once you get to know them Grin

Jack


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