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Author Topic: RAF file conversion  (Read 10545 times)
Waeshael
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« on: September 09, 2011, 09:44:06 AM »
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If you have never used FUJI's RAW file conversion program, you will not be able to take advantage of the improved image quality possible with the unusual FUJI RAW data.
When I convert using Fuji FinePix studio my S100fs images are 6000 x 4000 i.e 24 MP, and the file sizes are 72 MB in TIF format. If I use RAW converter or any other RAW converter the images are just 12 MP. The difference in detail is significant.
Anyone else actually doing this?
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John E
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« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2011, 03:06:18 PM »
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Sorry, I don't have this particular model (just took delivery on the X100), but I'm a bit confused, as the dpreview.com review of this camera ( http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilms100fs/ ) lists it as only 11.1 megapixels (-- 2/3" sensor with 11.1 million effective pixels --). Sounds like the software may be doing some kind of enlargement process?

dpreview describes the software thusly -- "Interestingly, the FinePix Studio raw conversion spits out huge 22MP files (in TIFF or JPEG format) - a throwback to the old days when all Super CCD cameras rendered their images with double the number of pixels on the sensor. Look forward to 63MB TIFFs if you are happy working in 8-bit or 127MB if you prefer 16-bit."

In other words, I don't think you're seeing an actual increase in pixels, just a software function.


John
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2011, 03:10:25 PM »
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Hi,

Size of a 16bit TIFF file without compression is 6xMP, so an 11MP image would be 66 MB.

Best regards
Erik


Sorry, I don't have this particular model (just took delivery on the X100), but I'm a bit confused, as the dpreview.com review of this camera ( http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/fujifilms100fs/ ) lists it as only 11.1 megapixels (-- 2/3" sensor with 11.1 million effective pixels --). Sounds like the software may be doing some kind of enlargement process?

dpreview describes the software thusly -- "Interestingly, the FinePix Studio raw conversion spits out huge 22MP files (in TIFF or JPEG format) - a throwback to the old days when all Super CCD cameras rendered their images with double the number of pixels on the sensor. Look forward to 63MB TIFFs if you are happy working in 8-bit or 127MB if you prefer 16-bit."

In other words, I don't think you're seeing an actual increase in pixels, just a software function.


John

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John E
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2011, 03:18:30 PM »
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Thanks for that, Erik. However, it's not the overall size of the file that's odd, here, it's the OP's description of a 6000x4000 output, versus only 12mp output in RAW, and considerable increase in detail. As the saying goes, "somethin' just don't add up".

John

Edit: Sorry, Erik, I just realized that the quote I used above didn't really support my point. Friday afternoon ... brain dead.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2011, 05:50:53 PM by John E » Logged
Waeshael
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2011, 05:59:23 PM »
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If you are not using the Fuji RAW converter you won't know what I am talking about. The additional data is only available if you use the Finepix Studio software. But if you use Silkypix there is an option I think to choose either to use the FUJI complete data, or an 11 MP reconstruction. Fuji, as you may know has an unusual and proprietary sensor design that has additional small photosites above and beyond the usual RGBG, and in good light these photodiodes, which are primarily aimed to capture highlight detail which is normally saturated in the larger photodiodes, can be used to provide additional resolution - hence the 24 MP files. Otherwise these diodes can be used to broaden the dynamic range for an 11 MP image.
Adobe and others cannot use this additional data. That is one reason that the RAW test images using ACR are so disappointing,. I don't know why the testers did not use FinePix studio for their evaluation. Image quality is much superior with Fujis own software. The same is true for other camera designs which use non Bayer sensor design. You have to use their own software to get the benefit of the sensor. ACR and other third party converters don't produce the same image quality as the proprietary software from the camera vendor. Try it for yourself.
There is a lot of info on this available on the Internet.
As you may know the dynamic range of the S100fs is some two stops better than most cameras, because of the design of the sensor - which is not a Bayer design. I routinely create 8 bit 70 MB images or 16 bit 140MB images using the Finepix studio converter. Nikon NX2 editor can handle the 16 bit TIF files created by Finepix Studio, and they make very fine pictures. I'd love to show some but there seems to no easy way to look at files this big over the internet. I think the slow speed of Finepix studio crunching all that data has turned people away from it. But you can batch process all RAF files, go and have dinner and you will get all the files in 16 bit TIF format using the Fuji default conversion settings, which are quite good, as the camera doesn't usually make mistakes with white balance and exposure in daylight. Colors, of course, are gorgeous.
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cameranphotography
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« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2011, 03:48:38 AM »
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i use the official convertor of Nikon (which i got with my D5100) i think its awesome. but the main problem is that it takes a huge time to convert it. i use core i3 laptop. so is this convertor works quicker?
thanks
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