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Author Topic: Michael's Yellowstone & Grand Teton Pics  (Read 6901 times)
Marshal
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« on: October 14, 2002, 02:12:46 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Unfortunately, I forgot to mention that the shots of the geese splashing down onto the lakes were also my favorites. I would have edited my post above if this board allowed me to.[/font]
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Marshal
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2002, 10:35:18 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']You really need to see a large print of many of these shots.[/font]
[font color=\'#000000\']I'd like to and am hoping you'll show them in a future Video Journal.[/font]
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jfabian
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2002, 03:24:07 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Michael,

Where did you rent the 600mm lens for the photo shoot?[/font]
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« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2002, 06:20:18 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Don...

I'm finding the D60 to be a superb camera. 11X17" prints are tack sharp. Not quite in Pentax 67 territory, but awfully good. Also, for this type of shooting where very long lenses were needed, only 35mm format would do.

jFabian...

The 600mm was obtained from Canon under their CPS program. This and other high-end gear is available to photographers who are members of their "Canon Professional Services" program.

Hank...

I couldn't agree more about how tiresome eyeball photographs of wildlife can be. Some photographers seem to make a fetish of this. I'm much more interested in seeing these creatures as part of the environment.

Michael[/font]
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neil
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« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2002, 07:21:46 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']
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I would have edited my post above if this board allowed me to.
Marshal, log in to post and you can edit your posts.[/font]
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Marshal
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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2002, 02:10:22 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Beautiful work as always Michael. My favorites were the shots with the geese either in the air flying in front of the mountains and lakes and also "Red, Grey and White".

The jpegs you posted were good hints at what the master RAW files must've looked like and the tweaked final versions you have saved on disk as Tiffs, PSDs or whatever. Hints only, since the 13X19s you're going to print and show on the Video Journal will certainly be excellent. Quiet frankly, I doubt the posted Jpegs can do them justice.

As good as the D60 is I suspect you really wish you had the 1Ds there with RAW capability at that. You'll have to revisit many of these places next year with that camera. Take your XPan and 1V as backup and leave the MF gear at home.[/font]
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« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2002, 05:51:10 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Thanks Marshall.

You're right. I wish I'd had a 1Ds instead of the D60, even though the D60 produces excellent images. You really need to see a large print of many of these shots.

My next shoot is a workshop in Southern New Mexico in early December. Hopefully I'll have my 1Ds by then.

Michael[/font]
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Don Miller
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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2002, 09:02:34 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']What a great collection of photos from one trip. I was surprised Michael devoted a full week to using the D60. I would like to hear about how Michael feels about the medium size prints from this camera after he has time to reflect on the images as compared to what he produces with his Pentax 67.

Don[/font]
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Hank
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« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2002, 04:29:23 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Michael-

Fortuitously your selection of photos illustrates the most rigid plank in my photographic soapbox. While your wildlife portraits are worthy, the environmental portraits of the animals in the larger landscape are a much more significant contribution to the "culture" of wildlife photography and photography as art. They go beyond close-ups that could be replicated in most zoos and wildlife farms, and thanks to your skills as a landscape photographer, show us so much more about the animals.

Too many of us feel that long lenses are required for wildlife photogrpahy, and that the point of it all is to fill as much frame as possible with hair or feathers. We feel we are obligated and justified in approaching the animals as close as possible. That line of thinking has led to a whole body of Park Service regulations, and to a large part encourages casual photographers and families to treat wildlife in parks like zoo animals. Even more, the urge to justify the price of a long lens with hairshots often blinds photographers to more meaningful broad views of the animal and its environment, often with the same long lens.

I won't pass up reasonable opportunities for frame-filling portraits with my own long lenses but rather than approaching too closely and stressing the animal, incurring the wrath of Park Service personnel, or setting unrealistic expectations for casual photographers, I seek exceptional environmental portraits if that is all the encounter presents. In that light your images are especially noteworthy.

Thanks!
Hank[/font]
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Marshal
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« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2002, 11:34:25 PM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Just wanted to say the Grand Teton and Yellowstone pics you included in the Digital v Film debate article are wonderful. All of them. But I particularly like the fallen tree and underbrush near the lake.[/font]
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« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2002, 09:31:44 AM »
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[font color=\'#000000\']Marshal,

Thanks. You know, this was a "throw away" type shot. By this I mean that we were taking a hike around the shore of the lake and I had the camera and a wide zoom over my shoulder. No tripod, no great expectations. Just a hike to check out the possabilities. Our plan was to go back to the car to get the right gear if we saw anything worthwhile,

I took this photograph in a very off-hand manner, stopping no more than 30 seconds to shoot it. A week later on-screen I realized that it worked extreemly well.

Sometimes you just can't tell at the moment.

Michael[/font]
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