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Author Topic: Ressing up with Aperture 3.1.3  (Read 4187 times)
bradf
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« on: October 25, 2011, 01:36:57 AM »
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Hi,
A beginner here, so I would appreciate your help.
Starting to learn about printing etc.
I'm interested in the concept of 'ressing up' and I understand the explanation as given here

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/und_resolution.shtml

..but where do I find this feature in Aperture ??
Many thanks.

PS tried to search and couldn't find, so my apologies if this has been covered already.
« Last Edit: October 25, 2011, 01:38:47 AM by bradf » Logged
JohnNewman
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« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2011, 04:50:13 AM »
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I'm happy to be corrected by anyone who knows better but, to the best of my knowledge, this is not a feature in Aperture.  You would have to edit in Photoshop or another external editor that has this facility.

However, if you print direct from Aperture you do have the option of setting the print resolution.  Dependent on the file dimensions and the paper size, you may or may not get a little yellow warning triangle in the corner.  What Aperture is doing under the hood, I've no idea - perhaps someone with more technical savvy could comment?

I've never tried upping the print resolution like this direct from Aperture but will give it a try over the next day or so and compare with upping resolution in P'shop. 

John
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bradf
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« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2011, 05:27:22 AM »
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Thanks John,
Is an obvious explanation of why I couldn't find the function.
I'll be very interested in your results
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CatOne
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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2011, 04:09:33 PM »
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You can increase the resolution of pictures in Aperture.  However you don't do it "in place" as that doesn't really make sense.

If you export an image from Aperture, you can tell it to export at a percentage of original size.  So if you export at 200%, it will take a 1000x750 image and export it at 2000x1500.

Try it; it's easy, just create an export preset.
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bradf
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« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2011, 08:13:02 PM »
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Ah good one, thanks a million Catone.
While I've got your attention 2 more questions:
1. I'm presuming if I had to 'res up" say 110% for the size of print I was after, that doing it with Aperture (as you describe ) is going to give a better quality print than using the original file and leaving it up to the printer to sort out ?
2. The preset gives a choice of color profile and defaults to sRGB IE61966-2.1 . I don't know anything about this. Can you explain, or is the answer "go and read about it !! "   Grin

Thanks.
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CatOne
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« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2011, 11:30:11 AM »
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1)  I don't know whether Aperture or the printer driver will do a better job of ressing up.  It probably depends on the quality of the printer.  I'd say, it's worth experimenting to see which gives you the best results.

2)  sRGB is appropriate if you are creating a JPEG you are saving to the web.  It's really the ONLY sensible choice for that.  If you are planning to do something ELSE with the image (or are using an output format other than JPEG) then you'd likely want a wider color space.  Adobe RGB is likely more appropriate in that case.

Color spaces are a colossally large and complicated subject.  There are entire books written on it (literally).  But generally "for web" = sRGB + JPEG, if you're not planning on doing anything after that with the images that are on the web.  For stuff you want to print or edit with other applications (i.e. Photoshop), using another file format and color space likely makes sense.
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