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Author Topic: 30 TB drives in our future?  (Read 2137 times)
meyerweb
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« on: November 02, 2011, 11:32:03 AM »
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Seagate currently sells a 3 TB 3.5" drive with 3 platters. Some of their other drives use 5 platters, so using the same technology we can certainly expect 5 TB drives in the reasonably near future.

And this article:  http://www.gizmag.com/salt-increases-data-density-of-hdds/20357/?utm_source=Gizmag+Subscribers&utm_campaign=65f6cd6026-UA-2235360-4&utm_medium=email

reports on research that should allow up to 6 times the current density using basically the same technology as today. That implies 6 TB per platter, instead of 1, and total capacity of 30 TB in a desktop size drive.

This kind of capacity just blows me away (I can remember when a 300 MB drive was considered large, and took a full height 5" drive bay). It doesn't appear that SSDs are going to replace mechanical hard drives for bulk storage any time soon.

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francois
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« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2011, 07:06:50 AM »
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I can remember when a 300 MB drive was considered large, and took a full height 5" drive bay). It doesn't appear that SSDs are going to replace mechanical hard drives for bulk storage any time soon.



I still remember having paid something in $1200 for a 20 MB drive!
I also agree that mechanical drives won't be easily/soon replaced by SSDs when it comes about massive storage systems.
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Francois
keithrsmith
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« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2011, 02:13:34 PM »
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The hard drive on my first computer was 64K (yes K) and took a 8 in unit in a rack.  On a PDP11.  It also had two tape drive (Dectapes) that were random access....

Keith
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JonathanRimmel
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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2011, 02:25:50 PM »
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Computer technology is ever evolving and ever changing, however there are currently some limitations going beyond 3TB, which is why we haven't seen harddrives with a higher capacity. It is likely the limit will be overcome in short order, but it might yet be a little while.
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Mr_S
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« Reply #4 on: November 03, 2011, 03:17:24 PM »
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The hard drive on my first computer was 64K (yes K) and took a 8 in unit in a rack.  On a PDP11.  It also had two tape drive (Dectapes) that were random access....

Keith


That's very cool Smiley  I've always been interested in computers for as long as I can remember but I'm a little to young to have dabbled with a PDP11.  So what machine are you running now and can you do the maths and tell us by what factor your storage has increased by?!
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hjulenissen
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« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2011, 03:37:16 PM »
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It doesn't appear that SSDs are going to replace mechanical hard drives for bulk storage any time soon.
Depends on what you mean by "anytime soon", but I think that spinning disks are a dying breed. People want their macbook airs and iPads and whatnot to be slim and light, and fewer and fewer users really need the power and flexibility of a regular desktop. Further, as more data seems to be moved into the "cloud" (or was it mainframe?), the need for massive local storage may decrease.

Of course, thats for the 95% of us. The remaining 5% are going to have stuff like a gazillion raw files from their digital MF that needs to be fast and reliably be served to their raw developer...

-h
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