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Author Topic: Rob Galbraith reviews the Nikon J1/V1  (Read 18429 times)
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #40 on: January 21, 2012, 12:33:32 AM »
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It seems that not everybody is in love with these: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikonv1j1/
Too bad, my search for a compact camera for travel or light hiking is still on.

I find their conclusions fair and extemely close to those of the other reviews.

Simply put: very good AF, image quality on par to that of the 12 mp 4/3, streamlined interface.

Among the negatives I agree that the bias of auto iso for low Iso is too strong and that should be corrected. Other than that not much to worry about really.

Cheers,
Bernard
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BJL
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« Reply #41 on: January 21, 2012, 07:08:22 AM »
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I find their conclusions fair and extemely close to those of the other reviews.

Simply put: very good AF, image quality on par to that of the 12 mp 4/3, streamlined interface.
I agree that this review is about "this camera is good for thus use case, not that", not a "thumbs down"?


But I do see two strange things, weighing in opposite directions:

- The familiar nonsense of looking at body size only rather than a complete working camera size, in complaining that the smaller sensor format has not produced a size advantage. And when the smaller lens size is mentioned, much later, it is phrased initially as mostly a disadvantage!  And the equally familiar and annoying theme that "being smaller and lighter is only a significant advantage if it makes the camera pocketable, which is only achieved with a prime lens". (if pocketability is the only reason a photographer would accept the IQ disadvantages of a smaller format, Leica's new-fangled 35mm "compact format" would never have succeeded against the well-established larger formats.)

- Comparing to the older 12MP 4/3" sensor, a product line that goes back to November 2008, is strange given that newer, better performing 4/3" sensor options like the 16MP sensor of the GX1 are available.
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #42 on: January 22, 2012, 01:52:35 AM »
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- Comparing to the older 12MP 4/3" sensor, a product line that goes back to November 2008, is strange given that newer, better performing 4/3" sensor options like the 16MP sensor of the GX1 are available.

True in many ways but I believe that it is still relevant to compare to the 12mp 4/3 though for the following reasons:
- they must represent 95% of the 4/3 cameras out there and are therefore a widely known benchmark,
- most people using them have been boasting about the image quality for months which means that that image quality is good enough for what they have been doing with those cameras.

Cheers,
Bernard
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BJL
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« Reply #43 on: January 22, 2012, 08:49:07 AM »
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True in many ways but I believe that it is still relevant to compare to the 12mp 4/3 though for the following reasons:
- they must represent 95% of the 4/3 cameras out there and are therefore a widely known benchmark,
- most people using them have been boasting about the image quality for months which means that that image quality is good enough for what they have been doing with those cameras.
Bernard,
Yes, that makes sense if intended as a "never mind the spec sheet and lab test obsesives, this sensor is as good as one that most actual customers are quite happy with".  At least if addresssed to an audience of people who judge things by a more normal, mainstream "good enough sensor, let me move on to consider other aspects like portability, and ease of use". And hopefully, that is a large share of the natural market for such a camera.

Actually, in this context it is historically appropriate to use for comparison the sensor for which the "good enough resolution" idea was stated in an unusually explicit way by an Olympus rep (so often misquoted and misinterpreted) "12MP is enough for _most_ purposes of _most_ photographers."
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armand
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« Reply #44 on: February 17, 2012, 07:36:03 PM »
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Some nice pictures taken in Myanmar with a V1 and nice comments about real world use: http://phototravelasia.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2012-01-27T22:29:00-08:00&max-results=10
If you go to the home page he has some nice ones from Vietnam also.
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #45 on: February 17, 2012, 11:52:10 PM »
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Some nice pictures taken in Myanmar with a V1 and nice comments about real world use: http://phototravelasia.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2012-01-27T22:29:00-08:00&max-results=10
If you go to the home page he has some nice ones from Vietnam also.

Thks, interesting read.

Cheers,
Bernard
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #46 on: February 23, 2012, 05:32:24 PM »
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DxO has just announced the support of the J1/V1 as of 7.2.1.

Currently they only have a lens module for the lens needing it most, the 10-30. First results are encouraging...

Cheers,
Bernard
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Paulo Bizarro
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« Reply #47 on: February 24, 2012, 03:42:10 AM »
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I am a "recent convert" to the 1 series, having just bought a J1 with the 10-30 lens. For what I want a small camera to do, it fits the bill perfectly. The other day I went for a stroll in one of the old quarters of Lisbon (I am from Portugal), just to test what this little camera was capable of doing. This is the type of photography that I use compact cameras for; walking around just photographing interesting things, not being burdened by a heavier/bulkier camera, while still getting high quality files.

I just set the camera to aperture priority and auto ISO, and that's it. Some images follow (Raw and Lightroom).
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Tord S Eriksson
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« Reply #48 on: March 16, 2012, 05:25:24 PM »
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Yeah, for me it has replaced most of my DSLRs, except for long lenses (I have no long ones with Nikon Mount), but up to 400mm the V1 works really well (actually Tokina 1.4X screw-on lens, Nikon 30- 110, x 2.7 magnification factor. Many use up to 600mm lenses on their V1s - I am not there yet - my longest is a Nikon 80-200 manual lens!
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hsteeves
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« Reply #49 on: March 18, 2012, 12:28:06 PM »
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I spent February On Cuzumel.  Took a D7000/5 lens outfit and a V1/3 lenses.  The V1/10-30 I could carry in a pocket of my shorts, 30-100 in the other side if I wanted it. Occasionally threw the flash in a shirt pocket with a flap.  This camera was just so handy - took 80% of my photos with it.  Only thing it didn't do well was the 50/1.8g and FT-1 combo at night for the Carnival parade. oh, and that stupid, loose dial on the back that accesses things I really don't want.  The V1 took a bit of a beating and got wet and survived.
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Tord S Eriksson
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« Reply #50 on: March 19, 2012, 02:32:40 AM »
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Yesterday we did some bird photography, and the light was bad (very overcast), so the only problem with the V1 was that I felt forced to use the 50/1.4G AF-S (and the TF1) instead of the 30-110, which would have been more suitable. So the shot of the wife came out better than the birds - you can't win 'em all!

Hope Nikon really makes some speedier lenses for the J1/V1, SOON! Say a 200/2.8 ;-)!

All the best,

Tord

PS The wider the lens, the more useful is having lots of pixels and physically big sensors. If I ever get a MF, or FF, camera I'll be using it with a 20 (or around there).
« Last Edit: March 19, 2012, 02:37:42 AM by Tord S Eriksson » Logged
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