Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 ... 8 9 [10]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: NEX-7 Rolling Review  (Read 50531 times)
AlanG
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 195



WWW
« Reply #180 on: December 18, 2011, 05:43:53 PM »
ReplyReply

I think M9 may loose in scaling up comparison because scaling up soften the image and always require sharpening after. When scaling up new pixels created in looser manner that when image scaled down. I think that Michael comparison is valid.


He must have already scaled up the M9 image otherwise the crop from it would not have matched the crop from the 18MP downsized Nex 7 shot.  (An APS-C size crop from the M9 is only 7.8MP to start with.  It is not 18MP.)

All I'm saying is that if you are going to do that, why scale down the Nex 7 shot from 24MP to 18MP first?
« Last Edit: December 18, 2011, 05:46:58 PM by AlanG » Logged

Alan Goldstein
Goldsteinphoto website

I have a new fine art project. Please take a look:
Fine art site

Galleries of images at Photoshelter:
Galleries
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8202



WWW
« Reply #181 on: December 18, 2011, 05:51:28 PM »
ReplyReply

From what I've read so far there seems to be no shortage of "advanced users" to whom the Nikon 1 series does appeal, shallow DOF limitations, inevitably, excepted. I'd also like to point out that in relation to this detailed and informative review of the NEX 7 there exists a vanishingly small number of potential buyers for whom there is a realistic option of using hideously expensive Leica lenses.

As I mentioned a few times, the key to my eyes is to know clearly what one's needs/usage patterns are.

As a single camera, the NEX7 is obviously very tempting. For a person with an existing array of cameras, including a well specced DSLR, I feel that the gain in real world size if not different enough from the DSLR to make it an appealing proposition.

Nikon has never been shy on self-cannibalization (think D700 using the same sensor and AF as the twice more expensive D3), so I am not sure if the sensor size of the 1 was designed to avoid cannibalizing the Nikon DSLRs (the 1 is in the same price bracket anyway). My guess is that they didn't see the value of offering something the size of a NEX (body + lenses).

A new platform is a strategic decision whose value is long term. From a rational standpoint, we can expect the already excellent 1 series sensor to reach a higher level in a few years. They are already sufficient for pro grade A3 prints that satisfy the need of 80% of photographers... even those not owning any other camera. I would not bet against the 1 series at this point of time.

Finally, using Leica lenses on a NEX7 does indeed make little economic sense for all but a tiny niche.

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Jeff Kott
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 117


« Reply #182 on: December 18, 2011, 07:59:23 PM »
ReplyReply


Finally, using Leica lenses on a NEX7 does indeed make little economic sense for all but a tiny niche.


Bernard, have you tried using a Leica lens on a NEX?

Using the NEX EVF for live view focus magnification and focus peaking is pretty compelling.
Logged
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8202



WWW
« Reply #183 on: December 18, 2011, 08:27:38 PM »
ReplyReply

Bernard, have you tried using a Leica lens on a NEX?

Using the NEX EVF for live view focus magnification and focus peaking is pretty compelling.

I have seen it done by a friend who owns a NEX-5n. It seems to be working very well on static objects, I don't doubt the value of the capability.

My point was that few people who look at the price bracket of the NEX will be willing to spend so much on Leica lenses.

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Peter McLennan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1695


« Reply #184 on: December 18, 2011, 08:53:11 PM »
ReplyReply

I'm assuming from the lack of discussion about the remote control that Sony didn't provide one with the review NEX-7.  Depending on its capabilities, this could be a very useful accessory, especially for video mode.
Logged
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6975


WWW
« Reply #185 on: December 18, 2011, 09:05:15 PM »
ReplyReply


My point was that few people who look at the price bracket of the NEX will be willing to spend so much on Leica lenses.

Cheers,
Bernard


I think that's clear. The whole point about Leica lenses on a NEX is mainly for people who are fortunate enough to already own Leica lenses and don't necessarily want to spend 8K on an M9.
Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
ErikKaffehr
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 7651


WWW
« Reply #186 on: December 18, 2011, 09:44:49 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi,

Yes, of course, if you can live with the crop factor. It may hurt a lot if you like to shoot wide angle.

Best regards
Erik


I think that's clear. The whole point about Leica lenses on a NEX is mainly for people who are fortunate enough to already own Leica lenses and don't necessarily want to spend 8K on an M9.
Logged

Jeff Kott
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 117


« Reply #187 on: December 18, 2011, 10:00:56 PM »
ReplyReply

I think that's clear. The whole point about Leica lenses on a NEX is mainly for people who are fortunate enough to already own Leica lenses and don't necessarily want to spend 8K on an M9.

Hmmm. There could be some people out there who always wanted to try using the absolute best lenses, but didn't want to deal with a rangefinder for whatever reason.

I bought a NEX 5N, EVF and then purchased a ZM 35 and CV 75/2.5. After using them for several months I have a NEX 7 on backorder, have just purchased a 28 Summicron and have a 50 Summicron on order.

I guess I must be some kind of weird outlier.  Grin
Logged
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8202



WWW
« Reply #188 on: December 18, 2011, 10:11:06 PM »
ReplyReply

I bought a NEX 5N, EVF and then purchased a ZM 35 and CV 75/2.5. After using them for several months I have a NEX 7 on backorder, have just purchased a 28 Summicron and have a 50 Summicron on order.

I guess I must be some kind of weird outlier.  Grin

It makes sense if you like the results and have the cash. Smiley

Such adapters are starting to appear for 1 series too, but I am not sure about the level of quality:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Leica-M-Lens-Nikon-1-Mount-Camera-Adapter-Ring-J1-V1-/220901394660

There are other ways to enjoy Leica lenses though. Replacement mount parts make it a breeze to use R lenses on F mount bodies for example. I do in fact have such a mount sitting on a shelf at my place, waiting for the Leica R 180 f2.8 APO it was supposed to be assembled on in brighter days.  Cheesy

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Jeff Kott
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 117


« Reply #189 on: December 18, 2011, 10:37:35 PM »
ReplyReply


There are other ways to enjoy Leica lenses though. Replacement mount parts make it a breeze to use R lenses on F mount bodies for example. I do in fact have such a mount sitting on a shelf at my place, waiting for the Leica R 180 f2.8 APO it was supposed to be assembled on in brighter days.  Cheesy


Hi Bernard,

Putting Leica R lenses on a Nikon body would result in a much larger solution. I travel a lot mostly with just carry on luggage. What I have been looking for is the highest image quality in the most compact possible package.

The other thing I have found is that with the NEX and EVF I have a much higher percentage of images in which I achieve critical focus as compared to my Nikon D300 or Pentax K5 with a split prism focus screen or using the AF "dot" to judge focus. My results are much better using my rangefinder ZM 35 on my NEX 5N than my ZF 35 on my D300.

Also, don't underestimate what a game changer focus peaking is. Here's a shot I took yesterday with the 5N and ZM 35.



Not that this is the greatest photo technically, but I saw these 4 coming towards me out of the corner of my eye and had about a second to focus and take the photo. With the EVF and focus peaking, I was able to get it. Trying to manual focus on a DSLR, there's no way I would have captured it.

The other thing is that when I use the NEX people don't have the same negative reaction to the camera that they have with an SLR. It looks like a point and shoot.

Kind regards,

Jeff

Logged
ErikKaffehr
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 7651


WWW
« Reply #190 on: December 18, 2011, 11:19:51 PM »
ReplyReply

No longer when you put a Leica 180/2.8 APO on it ;-)

Jeff,

I really appreciated your thoughtful comments. Focus peaking seems to be an interesting technique, which I unfortunately don't have on my stuff. Does it work for critically accurate focusing?

As I normally travel with a lot of gear I can really appreciate the alternative to keep wight down and quality up.

I'm a bit contemplating the options:

- NEX-7
- Alpha 77
- No more cameras right now

I have a Sony Alpha 55 SLT, which has LV. It's the camera I use for long telephoto (400, 560 and 800 using extenders). Main camera is the Alpha 900. The Alpha 55 SLT with 16-80 and 70-300 works as walkaround kit. But I would love to have a "real camera", with more switches and wheels.

Best regards
Erik


The other thing is that when I use the NEX people don't have the same negative reaction to the camera that they have with an SLR. It looks like a point and shoot.


Logged

Jeff Kott
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 117


« Reply #191 on: December 19, 2011, 01:09:20 AM »
ReplyReply


Jeff,

......Does it work for critically accurate focusing?


Hi Erik,

The thing that you have to keep in mind with focus peaking is that it shows the areas of highest contrast in the image, which are usually, but not always, the areas that are the most in focus.

It works best at wide apertures with shallower depth of field, but I find that between focus peaking and magnified live view, I can focus at my shooting aperture, which is another advantage because it eliminates any lens focus shift issues and you see the depth of field at your shooting aperture. For example, when taking a photo of a person at reasonably close distance wide open, the focus peaking will outline the dark part of the pupil or the eyelashes, which is perfect.

I find focus peaking least helpful outdoors in bright sunlight when there are many areas of the image with extremely high contrast. In those situations, one push of the button gives you eye level magnified live view for fine tuning. Push the button a second time and it zooms in even more. To avoid the issues involved with focusing in the center of the frame and then recomposing, you can push on the scroll wheel to move the zoomed in portion of the image around the frame.

So, after using the NEX for a while I find that between focus peaking and fine tuning with magnified live view I can pretty much nail focus in any situation. My percentage of critically focused shots is much higher than with AF or MF with my D300 or K5.

Also, my percentage of properly exposed shots on the first try is up because you can have a live histogram in the corner of the viewfinder and change exposure compensation and ISO to get the correct exposure and shutter speed without taking the camera from your eye. At this point, I feel kind of handicapped when I go back to the OVF of my D300 or K5.

I know this is heresy, but the reason I have a NEX is not because I cannot afford an M9.

Cheers,

Jeff
Logged
BernardLanguillier
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8202



WWW
« Reply #192 on: December 19, 2011, 04:18:05 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for that detailed feedback Jeff.

Cheers,
Bernard
Logged

A few images online here!
Mark D Segal
Contributor
Sr. Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6975


WWW
« Reply #193 on: December 19, 2011, 07:39:05 AM »
ReplyReply



I guess I must be some kind of weird outlier.  Grin

 "Mainly" describes a "general" circumstance. Exceptions are neither weird, nor outliers nor practicing heresy! What you are doing is obviously within your means, most interesting and you are surely getting excellent results with it, which is what matters most. I'm also using a NEX 5N though with the kit lens, and I find myself reaching for it more readily than for my 1DsMk3, whose functioning I am intimately familiar with, largely for the reasons you mention. I'm getting very satisfactory 11*17"-ish prints on 13*19" sheets with it, as long as I compose carefully enough to avoid excessive cropping.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2011, 03:42:34 PM by Mark D Segal » Logged

Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
douglasf13
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 547


« Reply #194 on: December 19, 2011, 02:11:08 PM »
ReplyReply

  Me too, Mark.  I finally sold my A900 and lenses after it was just sitting on the shelf too long.  I also use a 13x19 printer, and the 5N is certainly good enough for that.  As someone who prefers manual focus, despite the A900's OVF being the best in DSLR, it just can't match the accuracy of the focus magnification/focus peaking combo for manual focus.  As Jeff mentioned, throw in a live histogram, and it almost feels like cheating.  It's funny to scroll through my Lightroom catalogue, because you can tell when I started using NEX... the bad exposures are much rarer.   Smiley
Logged
Pages: « 1 ... 8 9 [10]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad