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Author Topic: C2PS #33 Capture Sharpen Question  (Read 6217 times)
Bryan Conner
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« on: November 24, 2011, 04:29:17 AM »
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First of all, super job on the videos guys.  I am really enjoying the videos and am doing my best impersonation of a sponge with all of the info.  I am learning some new things, gaining confidence in things I already knew, or believed, and have already gotten more than my money's worth in these videos.

I have watched the Capture Sharpen video twice this morning and everything has sunk in and I understand all except for one small part:  At the end of his description of high frequency images vs low frequency images ; At 7:29 to be exact, Jeff states that if the image is a high frequency image "you want to be below one...one is the default".  I am at a loss as to which setting the one is referring to.  I have replayed this section several times and I still can not link the setting of one to any of the sliders mentioned.  Can someone clarify this for me?  (Maybe I need a clarity slider on the back of my head that someone can slide to the right....LOL)

Thanks again for making all of this wonderful knowledge available for us.  And props to Chris on the fantastic editing job.  Looks very nice and is easy to follow.
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Josh-H
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« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2011, 04:58:14 AM »
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I am at a loss as to which setting the one is referring to.

I have not seen the video yet - but based on your description I would say Jeff was referring to the Radius setting.  Almost always a setting of less than 1 is optimal for images with a lot of high frequency detail.
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Bryan Conner
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« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2011, 05:19:21 AM »
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I have not seen the video yet - but based on your description I would say Jeff was referring to the Radius setting.  Almost always a setting of less than 1 is optimal for images with a lot of high frequency detail.

That would be my guess also, but the comment is during the discussion of the masking slider.  You could be right, but at this point I am guessing and assuming....and we all know what three words we can make from assume....
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Bryan Conner
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« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2011, 05:45:23 AM »
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Update:   After watching this section of the video a few more times...it is clear that Jeff is talking about the radius slider without mentioning the slider by name until a few minutes later.  Once again, great job guys.  Wonderful stuff in these videos.
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Schewe
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« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2011, 12:47:57 PM »
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Update:   After watching this section of the video a few more times...it is clear that Jeff is talking about the radius slider without mentioning the slider by name until a few minutes later.

Sorry for the confusion...but yes, it's the radius slider that needs to be adjusted based on the predominate edge frequency in the image. I haven't seen the final cut of this segment...I'll go get it and check it out.
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Bryan Conner
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« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2011, 02:15:06 PM »
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Sorry for the confusion...but yes, it's the radius slider that needs to be adjusted based on the predominate edge frequency in the image. I haven't seen the final cut of this segment...I'll go get it and check it out.

No worries on the confusion...the older I get (about to be 46) the more used to being confused I become.  Actually, it would be confusing to me if I were not confused at least once a day...LOL.
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marvpelkey
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« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2011, 03:41:54 PM »
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I also have a question on this same video and I hope it is OK to piggyback on this thread, rather than start a new thread for the same video.

Around 3:27, Jeff Schewe states, in discussing edges and radius "radius is distance on either side in pixels or fractions of a pixel....".

As I have always thought that a radius is the smallest "component" in an image (i.e - it can only be one colour or tone), I am confused by the reference to "fractions of a pixel" and how radius can affect a partial pixel. Can someone explain?

As a general comment, I am finding these videos very well done and informative and worth every penny.

Thanks

Marv
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Schewe
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« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2011, 05:01:32 PM »
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As I have always thought that a radius is the smallest "component" in an image (i.e - it can only be one colour or tone), I am confused by the reference to "fractions of a pixel" and how radius can affect a partial pixel. Can someone explain?

By default, the radius in ACR/LR is 1 pixel. That means the sharpening algorithm will apply the sharpening to edges based on the 1 pixel radius. ACR/LR can determine the sharpening based on a radius from .5 pixels to 3 pixels. When calculating the radius below 1 pixel it does indeed use a fraction. It makes the sharpening super fine.
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marvpelkey
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« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2011, 07:00:47 PM »
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Interesting. Thanks for the quick reply.

Marv
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