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Author Topic: Timeless Matte on Canvas application tips...  (Read 1279 times)
K P
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« on: November 30, 2011, 10:06:49 PM »
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So since there is no need to reinvent the wheel, I wanted to ask for some tips with applying timeless matte onto canvas.

I have the glossy right now and spray it on with a wagnar spray guy and this works great.  I do feel that when I was using the rolling technique with Eco Print Shield, the coating was a little more durable as it was worked into the canvas rather than just sitting on top which is what happens with spraying, but after a good 5 or 6 coats of glossy timeless, I am able to stretch and fold over the corners without cracking.

I am wondering though if the application of matte will be any different.  All the art shops that I am selling to now seem to have all their gallery wraps with a matte surface that almost doesn't even look coated.  I quite like glossy myself, but the matte seems to sell better so I ordered a gallon to be consistant with what they are already doing.  Back when I was using Eco Print Shield, the instructions for matte were to use it as a final layer, but to start with glossy for the first few layers.  Is this how I should be working with the timeless matte as well?  I will of course experiment myself, but figured that lots of people here have gone down this same road and I can save myself lots of time and money in wasted samples.  Thanks.
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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2013, 01:38:07 PM »
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KP, did you ever get the answer to this question?  I'm curious on this myself
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Mark Lindquist
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2013, 03:43:01 PM »
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So am I...
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K P
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2013, 04:06:29 PM »
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Oh wow... what a blast from the past!

I have come a long way since I asked this question.  The matte is wonderful, but I would say not completely usable if not mixed with gloss.  I would that straight matte coating gives the prints an almost talcum powder residue.  Also, the matte timeless doesn't seem to be as durable.  The gloss is way more plastic in look, but I think this also improves how it sticks to itself and to the canvas.  So what I do now is mix 20% gloss and 80% matte.  Just a little bit of gloss in the mixture improves it so much.  Yes, it does take away from the full matte look, but if your prints will be hanging in a store, it is essential.  Also, I am not folding full corners.  I finish my canvases with black tape all around as its much more durable.  I used to print the black right onto the canvas but the corners just break down over time and from handling.  The black tape holds up so much better and is so much easier in terms of production.
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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2013, 04:21:59 PM »
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KP, I'd love to see a picture of this black tape procedure you speak of
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K P
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« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2013, 09:05:50 PM »
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Here are some quick pics I took with my phone.

I prefer this method over a true gallery wrap.  My reasoning is that the image that is mirrored over the side just doesn't look professional.  First, the edge never lines up with the edge of the picture, so on the side you always have part of the picture and then the awkward looking mirrored part.  If you just wrap the image around then this would be fine, but when you take a picture, you rarely frame it up so that you have so much room around your subject to take into account two inches all around for the canvas.  And as I mentioned up above, this method is simply more durable.  For the record, I prefer Bill T.'s technique way more, mounting canvas to something hard and popping it into a frame.  But this is ultra expensive as it is impossible for me to get local made frames for cheap.  I am making my own stretcher bars for less than $5... (basically just made using a router and some 1x2's).  If I price in a frame, there goes my profit margin and there go the sales.

(Edit.  Don't mind the overlap of the black tape.  This little canvas was just made as a sample and hence I wasn't as careful to line up the end of the tape over the beginning.  I also do this in the top left corner as I figure the picture on the wall would be at a height that would make you not be able to see the top edge.  Also, you should get a good idea about the shine I get from the 80% matte and 20% gloss mixture that I get.)
« Last Edit: June 19, 2013, 09:53:13 PM by K P » Logged
huguito
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« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2013, 01:05:00 AM »
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Looks very nice.
What kind of tape is that and where can I order some to try it?
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K P
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« Reply #7 on: June 20, 2013, 01:45:25 AM »
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Looks very nice.
What kind of tape is that and where can I order some to try it?

Its black gaffer's tape.  There are many brands, and lots of different stickiness levels.  And on top of this, also different levels of shine and texture.  I have ordered this one before and its decent.

http://www.amazon.com/Pro-Tapes-Pro-Gaff-Gaffers-Tape/dp/B000QC0XZO/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1371710364&sr=8-5&keywords=gaffer+tape

But its not as good as the roll I get from my framing place.  The roll from my framer says ProTapes on it as well, but its different than the Pro Gaff that appears to be from Pro Tapes as well which is in the Amazon pic.  You might have to try a few till you find one you like.  As a tip, when the last bit of tape overlaps the first bit of tape, I put some glue under this as I have found out that the tape does tend to pull up at this edge.  This is also why I staple the back corners as seen in the pics.  It just helps to keep it together long term.  The nature of gaffer tape seems to be that the glue is very sticky, but also removable so as not to leave a residue.  This probably is why it can sometimes pull up a bit and hence my use of glue under the very last inch of it.
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Mark Lindquist
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« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2013, 09:45:10 PM »
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KP -
Wow - I'm kindof shocked at the use of gaffer's tape - man that stuff is like poison to neutral PH.  Not to mention over time it can get gooey and ucky.

But I guess each to his own.  You're right that getting the corners right with mirrored edges can be extremely difficult, however I have to say, the black gaffer's tape seems a kluge, but then again, I'm a purist in that regard.  I would urge you to check into the possibility of finding some tape that has some archival quality, however, unless you don't care or it just doesn't concern you.  My main concern is that gaffer's tape is actually meant to be used for short term applications and really doesn't even exhibit much in the way of Triboluminescence when tested.  That stuff could conceivably come off after a certain period of time, but I could be wrong....

Regarding the timeless Matte - isn't that a tad on the milky side, your mixture? 

Wondering if you have pushed the testing to see how little Matte you could get away with?

All this stuff is subjective, so please don't be offended by my comments / questions.

-Mark
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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2013, 09:52:08 PM »
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For me as far as the mirrored edges, I usually size the image up +.1" all around to give me a little wiggle room on the edges not lining up perfectly.  If the image is a nature shot with trees and sky I get away with a perfect mirror edge and you can't even really tell where the image ends and mirrors.  Since I use the Pitbull Wrap Stretcher tool it's so easy to pull as much as I need to align everything perfectly all the way around.  Plus pulls corners real nice and tight.  Only thing I'm still fighting with here and there are minor cracks on edge folding.  I got the edges to stop cracking but there's a lot of coating on the print.  Almost looks a little plasticy.  Seems like I have to really spray on the coating with heavy coats like twice to give me good protection.  Just don't like the result.  Still experimenting with different methods right now, though. 
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