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Author Topic: Early winter  (Read 2912 times)
sdwilsonsct
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« on: December 02, 2011, 12:51:08 PM »
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Thanks for looking. Scott
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shaunw
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« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2011, 03:09:46 AM »
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I like this Scott you ve captured that lovely cold /still feel very well...only slight niggle for me is there are lots of horizontals in the image then the tree (right) cuts through them all, which for me distracts a little....other wise very nice.

regards shaun
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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2011, 07:51:19 PM »
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Thanks Shaun! I see your point. I put the tree in to tie together the top and bottom part of the image, and perhaps to discourage the eye from running off downstream.
Scott
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brandtb
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« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2011, 09:41:44 AM »
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In an image like this...I would suggest that it might be helpful for you to ask yourself..."what is my subject?"
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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2011, 12:11:21 PM »
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it might be helpful for you to ask yourself..."what is my subject?"

Good question, Brandt. In this next image the subject (in my mind) is more prominent. I am curious to know whether this is better, or if both pictures are Not Very Interesting.
Scott
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degrub
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« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2011, 08:22:51 PM »
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Does your intent come across the way you wanted if you leave a hint/suggestion of the darkness instead of making it dominant ?

Frank
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2011, 10:46:56 PM »
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I like the second one a lot. The vast expanse of dark just forces me to the lovely snow scene at the top.

I wouldn't change a thing in this one.

Eric
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francois
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« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2011, 05:07:33 AM »
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I have a preference for your last image. As Eric said above, the very bright snowy bank at the top is like the light at the end of the tunnel.
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Francois
sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2011, 12:28:09 PM »
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Thank you, Francois and Eric.

Frank, my thinking was that the white in the foreground (of the first image) enhanced the dark water, by contrast. I was also attracted to the contrasting textures of the gnarly reeds and the smooth water. The main theme was diminished too much perhaps.

Scott
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Isaac
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« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2011, 12:44:46 PM »
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... my thinking was that the white in the foreground (of the first image) enhanced the dark water, by contrast. I was also attracted to the contrasting textures of the gnarly reeds and the smooth water.

I found the foreground snow distracting, somehow I saw it as out-of-focus cotton wool - I wanted the foreground to start with the gnarly reeds.

The second image is much stronger, but ominous/threatening - so although I think it's better I wouldn't want to look at it every day ;-)
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luxborealis
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« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2011, 07:33:09 AM »
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While the dark negative space of the the second image is haunting and creates a truly beautiful photograph, the composition of the first image is much more dynamic. I am drawn circularly through the first image. In the second image, it's like arriving at a T-intersection and not knowing which direction to turn: after crossing the dark expanse of water do I go left or right? (see below)

In #1, I would also slightly brighten the highlights in the foreground snow just to liven it up thereby  providing a "starting point" for the viewer's eye.

But let's not kid ourselves - they are both wonderful photographs.
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jeremypayne
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« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2011, 07:57:26 AM »
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First image ... Blah ... Boring.

Second image is a winner.
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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2011, 11:10:33 AM »
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although I think it's better I wouldn't want to look at it every day ;-)

I'll take that as a compliment, Isaac: thanks!  Smiley

Thanks for the analysis, Luxborealis. I'll use this in the future. My thinking was that image 1 would be more appealing, so I posted it first. But image 2 is the one on my screensaver that I like to see repeatedly.

Thanks for your input, Jeremy: appreciated.

Scott
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fineartphotos
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« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2011, 06:45:42 AM »
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I can see you have done a nice composition here. I like it, there is something lacking though.
I can see you have read about composition or took art class, you have left a lot of empty space and place the three on the side. For some reason it does not work for me.
Perhaps the symmetrical foreground, water and background even though sometimes it works.

You should try to change the point of view, I mean keep your camera very high above your head and then shoot keeping the camera very low at your knees or lower.

The tree on the side is very good idea and commonly used technique to add dynamic to the photograph, unfortunately your tree is cut in half by horizon or the sky.

Great job though.
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