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Author Topic: Choosing lenses.  (Read 6940 times)
bcooter
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« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2011, 09:10:54 PM »
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I used to use those Lee hoods on my view camera and have been thinking about them again recently for the small lens, lightweight setup.  Do you use filters with them?  I have a set of glass ND's that usually go in the Arri MB but if they would fit in the Lee too that would be awesome.

The only downside to the Lee's is they're easy to pop off if your moving around and secondly the newer Lee shades have a cheaper spring loaded connector.  That little bronze connector will break if you look at it wrong.

Also it's easy to bend them in and cut off a corner of a frame.

The upside is it makes the camera look less cinema like which helps for some areas you permit and location fees.

IM0

BC
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billy
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« Reply #21 on: December 21, 2011, 12:06:02 AM »
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sounds like most people buying the new zeiss lenses are preferring the nikon mount ( zf ) over the canon mount ( ze ), why?
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bcooter
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« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2011, 03:07:37 AM »
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sounds like most people buying the new zeiss lenses are preferring the nikon mount ( zf ) over the canon mount ( ze ), why?

For a lot of reasons.

Older manual Nikors were known for their sharpness and for years were color matched through generations.  They also had manual F stop settings on the lenses when other makers when to servo settings and most importantly, there was a huge range of focal lengths and specialty lenses available.

It was natural that the motion film world picked up on them.  You could get a convertor to an F mount on almost any camera and tons of lens makers and third party camera repairs would build you a Nikon mount.

They were also small, lightweight and most had a 72mm front screw mount across the range.

Even to this day, some Nikon lenses are considered legendary.

I have an old Push Pull 80 to 200 zoom that we continue to use on our REDs.  It's been through hell and back and is the oldest lens I actively own and use and it still is amazingly sharp.

In regards to the "backwards" focus, that depended on what you were use to and most people adapted quickly.

In fact in stills, going from Nikon to Canon made me believe Canon had it backwards.

IMO

BC
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ChristopherBarrett
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« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2011, 05:39:05 AM »
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Billy,

That's largely due to the ZFs having a manual aperture ring on them where the ZEs have only an electronic aperture. There isn't any other difference except focus rotation direction.

CB
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Bern Caughey
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« Reply #24 on: December 22, 2011, 10:19:45 AM »
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When traveling abroad I use a Lee compendium, but as Cooter mentioned, even when taped down the hood can fall off, or rotate, too easily.

My cam has built-in NDs so I use the Lee just for their resin Grads (& the occasional screw-in polarizer), but only on sticks where I can usually deal with these limitations.

Due to their weight I doubt I'd use this system for 4" glass filters, but if your interested Lee offers a solution, or you could buy the holder they make for Schneider.

www.schneideroptics.com/ecommerce/CatalogItemDetail.aspx?CID=1697&IID=7621

Samy's Hollywood may have one in stock. The one I special ordered, but rejected.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2011, 10:24:51 AM by Bern Caughey » Logged
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