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Author Topic: Shooting around with the wide angle  (Read 2792 times)
Roberto Frieri
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« on: December 19, 2011, 09:39:02 AM »
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M8 + Distagon 4/18
Post processing in Capture One

For more wide angle pictures see http://www.robertofrieri.net/20111218T143836.html
« Last Edit: December 25, 2011, 07:16:28 AM by Roberto Frieri » Logged

Roberto Frieri
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Rob C
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« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2011, 01:14:18 PM »
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Roberto

I like the last one, perhaps you could investigate the work of this man:

http://www.jamesravilious.com

who was a Leica man, dedicated to the campagna, albeit the south-western English one! There's a great tv video somewhere about him (posthumous, sadly), where his wife talks about him and his interest in old Leica lenses, and how he found that they were far better when shooting into the light (as you like to do) because whilst not as contrasty as modern ones, they did retain detail in shadow that newer designs did not.

A remarkable man.

Rob C
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Roberto Frieri
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« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2011, 02:03:22 PM »
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...perhaps you could investigate the work of this man:
http://www.jamesravilious.com...
Rob C

Thank you for your comment and valued suggestion.
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Roberto Frieri
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kikashi
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« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2011, 02:49:26 AM »
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The first and, particularly, the last are the ones that strike me. I love the light in the fourth.

Jeremy
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Rob C
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« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2011, 11:13:14 AM »
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Regarding the James Ravilious film:


The documentary (by Anson Hartford of Banyak Films) is obtainable from
www.banyak.co.uk, or you can probably get it via Amazon.
The title is  James Ravilious - A World in Photographs.

Rob C

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Roberto Frieri
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« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2011, 02:45:28 PM »
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The first and, particularly, the last are the ones that strike me. I love the light in the fourth.
Jeremy
Thank you Jeremy.
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Roberto Frieri
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Roberto Frieri
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« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2011, 02:56:01 PM »
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Regarding the James Ravilious film:
The documentary (by Anson Hartford of Banyak Films) is obtainable from
www.banyak.co.uk, or you can probably get it via Amazon.
The title is  James Ravilious - A World in Photographs.
Rob C

Hi Rob C, I have just found this book on Amazon: "An English Eye: The Photographs of James Ravilious".
Thank you again.
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Roberto Frieri
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« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2011, 02:50:53 AM »
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Hi Rob C, I have just found this book on Amazon: "An English Eye: The Photographs of James Ravilious".
Thank you again.




Piacere!

Rob C
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francois
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« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2011, 05:19:30 AM »
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The last one is my favorite. I agree with Jeremy, the light is wonderful. I also like the second one a lot. I'm a bit less enthused with the third image, I don't know if it's the faming or the positioning of the sun or the barely visible silhouette of the "Chalet" but for me, it's not up to the level of the other photos.
I'm split on the first one… it's almost a winner (for me, again) but I'd like a tad more depth of field. But I'm nitpicking and, in the end, the image might not be better at all…

Thanks for sharing!
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Francois
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« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2011, 08:43:58 AM »
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Wideangle is king - for me, too!

Wonderful photographs - well processed with a lovely "old world" treatment, which is meant purely as a compliment.

I think the fourth photo seems to most "popular" perhaps because you have done a perfect job in composition, taking best advantage of the three-dimensional qualities of wideangle lenses with a strong foreground and leading lines through the photo to the background. With all four, we feel like we are "there" but with the fourth, especially, we are not only "there", but we can visually walk through the scene.

In the first, I feel a disconnect between the well and the distant building cut in half by the water. The second photo has the tree anchoring the right side, but no visual pathways leading throughout the photo. The third is a lovely, crisp silhouette, but without shadow detail there's no where to "go" but to the sun and along the rim of shadow.

The fourth is filled with visual pathways - the cobble road and various fence lines. I think I would have stepped to the left so that the intersection of the pathways leading to the bright area down the valley wasn't "behind" the tree. Otherwise, this is a wonderful image.

Oh how I miss Europe!
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Terry McDonald
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RSL
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« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2011, 09:04:42 AM »
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#4 is a genuine winner, Armand. Good seeing.
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Roberto Frieri
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« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2011, 01:59:09 PM »
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Thank you Francois, Terry and Russ.

This is a picture that I like but I have not included in the portfolio on my website.
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Roberto Frieri
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luxborealis
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« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2011, 02:43:35 PM »
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Yet another beautiful wide angle!
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Terry McDonald
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Rob C
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« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2011, 01:06:17 PM »
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Thank you Francois, Terry and Russ.

This is a picture that I like but I have not included in the portfolio on my website.



Not this time, Roberto - it seems to lack a subject.

In fact, it's a perfect example of what I have repeatedly found (and remarked upon) with my own attempts in the genre: it makes a great location for a person shot; the model is missing. As I said, I did this all the time, and so seldom bother doing it at all anymore. Fortunately, you are usually able to make it work.

Rob C
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