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Author Topic: D4  (Read 10140 times)
fredjeang
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« Reply #40 on: January 13, 2012, 02:39:13 AM »
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Talking about "photography factory" (someone posted a link to this site in another thread), there is a D4 evaluation here: http://www.photography-factory.co.uk/photographyreviews/posts/our-diary/ ...that seems quite honest.

It balance a little bit the overall enthusiasm and IMO the negative points are worth a consideration.

They think the same as I do: too expensive in 2012 for what it brings on the table.

I'd wait for a GH3 or a 5D3.

Ps: personal consideration, about the ergonomics, the Nikons pro bodies IMO suck. The F3 was the ultimate well designed camera. When student in Paris, I worked regularly with a F4, I hated it compared to the F3. Too heavy and always unbalanced, difficulty for small hands to reach controls while handling firmly the toy etc...I finaly bought myself a FM2 and it was like breathing again. Nikon always kept the same design for their digital top cameras, heavy, big, unfriendly ergo. If you got small hands, it will be a real pain. The 1D is about that big but controls are better implemented and weight is more equilibrate, at least for me.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2012, 02:54:12 AM by fredjeang » Logged
Rob C
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« Reply #41 on: January 14, 2012, 04:55:18 AM »
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Talking about "photography factory" (someone posted a link to this site in another thread), there is a D4 evaluation here: http://www.photography-factory.co.uk/photographyreviews/posts/our-diary/ ...that seems quite honest.

It balance a little bit the overall enthusiasm and IMO the negative points are worth a consideration.

They think the same as I do: too expensive in 2012 for what it brings on the table.

I'd wait for a GH3 or a 5D3.

Ps: personal consideration, about the ergonomics, the Nikons pro bodies IMO suck. The F3 was the ultimate well designed camera. When student in Paris, I worked regularly with a F4, I hated it compared to the F3. Too heavy and always unbalanced, difficulty for small hands to reach controls while handling firmly the toy etc...I finaly bought myself a FM2 and it was like breathing again. Nikon always kept the same design for their digital top cameras, heavy, big, unfriendly ergo. If you got small hands, it will be a real pain. The 1D is about that big but controls are better implemented and weight is more equilibrate, at least for me.


Fred –

I worked with the F, which I loved; bought the F2 as an alternative (and a security device allowing me two boss cameras for constantly alternating cameras just-in-case); I had an FM for the faster sun-synch. and then the FM2n(?) replaced that. Having had both the F and F2 repaired a couple of times because of the problems of salt and mildew from working and later living near the sea, I finally bought into the F4 system with an F4s. I hated it. It was very heavy, I could never get the auto-film loading to work, causing huge embarrassment in front of clients/models. I discovered that the F3 was then still in production! despite Nikon keeping it very quiet. That led to my step backwards and I got rid of the F4s immediately. I still have that F3, almost unused, since it coincided with the tail-off of my work.

My first digital was the D200 and then I added a D700, simply because I couldn’t get a reasonable offer for the D200. I love everything about the D700 except for one thing: it’s too bloody heavy!

So guess what? All I am currently playing with is my cellphone. (Cellpix sub-gallery in The Biscuit Tin on my website, for anyone interested.)

There’s something wrong with that equation: all the money goes on expensive gear yet the cheapest option takes pride of well, not place, but certainly of choice when confronted with the reality of need vs. comfort.

Rob C

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fredjeang
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« Reply #42 on: January 14, 2012, 07:12:24 AM »
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Fred –

I worked with the F, which I loved; bought the F2 as an alternative (and a security device allowing me two boss cameras for constantly alternating cameras just-in-case); I had an FM for the faster sun-synch. and then the FM2n(?) replaced that. Having had both the F and F2 repaired a couple of times because of the problems of salt and mildew from working and later living near the sea, I finally bought into the F4 system with an F4s. I hated it. It was very heavy, I could never get the auto-film loading to work, causing huge embarrassment in front of clients/models. I discovered that the F3 was then still in production! despite Nikon keeping it very quiet. That led to my step backwards and I got rid of the F4s immediately. I still have that F3, almost unused, since it coincided with the tail-off of my work.

My first digital was the D200 and then I added a D700, simply because I couldn’t get a reasonable offer for the D200. I love everything about the D700 except for one thing: it’s too bloody heavy!

So guess what? All I am currently playing with is my cellphone. (Cellpix sub-gallery in The Biscuit Tin on my website, for anyone interested.)

There’s something wrong with that equation: all the money goes on expensive gear yet the cheapest option takes pride of well, not place, but certainly of choice when confronted with the reality of need vs. comfort.

Rob C



I agree Rob. You came to the same conclusion as mine about the F4. I hated it too. Really really too big and heavy. I remember walking in Paris at night with it and it was Hell and I was really young. The F3 was a much more friendly device and we could get rid-of the battery grip. In the end, the FM2 (my version was exactly a FE2 wich is electronic) did the same job, lighter, faster, and cooler. (but didn't look so pro and the "whao" factor you know...)
And look, Nikon still produces the FM2 today ! That's for a reason.

The D2,3,4... line has the same design as the F4. Even without touching the D4, I know already from the F4 experience that I will hate it too. Those camera are made for giants with big hands.

I can't help thinking of this D4 inside a metal cage with all the viewfinders, lcd screen, cablery mess, batteries and matte-box etc... and it will be as agile as an Arriflex.

I think that the Nikon V1 is much more exciting camera.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2012, 07:24:55 AM by fredjeang » Logged
KevinA
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« Reply #43 on: January 16, 2012, 07:38:02 AM »
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It will all come down to the rolling shutter for me. Yes I am in the market for a video solution, wether that is a DSLR or a video cam will be decided by the amount of wobble I can expect.
Although I am  Canon shooter the D4 looks a better option. Canon need to take the breaks off and just build the best they can now and stop this drip feed of essential features, it will cost them future sales rather than protect them.

Kevin.
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Kevin.
Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #44 on: January 18, 2012, 08:01:21 AM »
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Just got a birthday present from my mates kids.. better than the real thing!

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Sam Morgan Moore Cornwall
www.sammorganmoore.com -photography
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #45 on: January 24, 2012, 04:58:46 PM »
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New D4 video sample + explanations:

http://www.joemcnally.com/blog/2012/01/23/nikon-d4-video-the-blues-in-his-shoes/

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
fredjeang
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« Reply #46 on: February 07, 2012, 01:39:48 AM »
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Have you seen the D800 E at 3000 euros?

Specs are quite high.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 01:41:27 AM by fredjeang » Logged
Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #47 on: February 07, 2012, 11:11:42 AM »
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Yes it looks interesting

Rolling back in time (I can't remember when) there was a time when I used to shoot 2 nikon D100 cameras - I really could not see the point of the , was it, D1x, at twice the price

I think the same could be true of this combo

--

So far I am not that interested in the D4 - I don't think the video will match my FS100 and also the connections do not have the robustness for me to feel like it could be professional use (for video)

I'll probably stick with the FS100 and a stills camera for a while - having motion and video in one device is really only a big deal to those who shoot in the mountains and must minimise weight to the gram

The step up from the FS100 would be Scalet - Im not ready for that

Much more important is to continue developing the skill of telling stories with the camera..

My latest story ..
http://vimeo.com/36244144

if my D3 falls apart I don't know what I would buy

The 1:1 on the D4 is IMO a big deal that is missing from the 800

If you have ever tried shooting motion with a 400 2.8 you would appreciate shooting 1:1 with a 70-200 or suchlike

Best

SMM







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Sam Morgan Moore Cornwall
www.sammorganmoore.com -photography
fredjeang
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« Reply #48 on: February 07, 2012, 11:35:22 AM »
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...

My latest story ..
http://vimeo.com/36244144

...

Yes!

Well done Morgan. Serious and continuous work is paying.

Congrats.
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Morgan_Moore
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« Reply #49 on: February 07, 2012, 12:16:21 PM »
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Yes!

Thanks. You understand this is no director, crew, etc - a TV news report could look like this

The shooting is not so special but I worked on.. a beginning - slowly revealing

1) she is good - GB top
2) she is very good - trying for the olympics
3) her sport

Also I managed an end - a hope for the future

It is the structure that I feel is the biggest challenge to the stills photographer - most of know which way to point the lens!

(and audio!)

S
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Sam Morgan Moore Cornwall
www.sammorganmoore.com -photography
fredjeang
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« Reply #50 on: February 07, 2012, 01:44:09 PM »
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Thanks. You understand this is no director, crew, etc - a TV news report could look like this

The shooting is not so special but I worked on.. a beginning - slowly revealing

1) she is good - GB top
2) she is very good - trying for the olympics
3) her sport

Also I managed an end - a hope for the future

It is the structure that I feel is the biggest challenge to the stills photographer - most of know which way to point the lens!

(and audio!)

S

Yeah, I didn't say it just like the facebook's congrats. I think it is indeed a very consistent work, the structure as you described and so importantly, it connects emotionally and visually.

What's also very nice is to see your evolution from the beginning and it's each time better.

I like that.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2012, 01:45:58 PM by fredjeang » Logged
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