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Author Topic: Carbofiber Tripod 3 or 4 sections ?  (Read 10711 times)
Jack Flesher
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« on: October 09, 2003, 10:03:39 AM »
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Hi JF,
Three-section tripods are faster to operate and a bit more rigid. Four-section generally pack smaller (not that much) and are sometimes longer. I'm using a Gitzo 1348 (4 section) and find the four sections not a problem.
In the VJ, Michael seems to like the four section Gitzo. He says it adds versatility over uneven terrains.
Opinions are ... opinions, you should try both to see which of the 3 or 4 section fits your needs and taste.


francois
Tripod legs are mostly made of tubing and two things affect rigidity in tubing and hence stability on tripod legsets; diameter and length.  While the 4th set of legs in a 4-section tripod is indeed narrower than the third leg, it AND all of the legsets above it are shorter.  these two factors almost always cancel each other out and hence rigidity and stability remain pretty constant.  This is why gitzo rates the similar 3 and 4 section tripods in the same series with the same load capacities.  From a practical standpoint, the differences are convenience of dealing with fewer legs in the 3-section versus a more compact rig with the 4-section pods.
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Willowroot
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« Reply #1 on: October 10, 2003, 08:37:40 AM »
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If someone made me get a Gitzo tripod, I'd get a three-section just in order to minimize the use of those twist-locks.  Much prefer flip-locks.  Just my opinion.

Jason
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Jason Elias
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2003, 11:05:42 AM »
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If someone made me get a Gitzo tripod, I'd get a three-section just in order to minimize the use of those twist-locks. Much prefer flip-locks. Just my opinion.

Jason
Here! here! - I've had the superb Gitzo CF's for some years but those twisty bits finally gave me more aggro than I could bear - I'm a happy bunny now that I have changed to the Manfrotto with their so easy to handle flip-locks - no more sore hands - my two pennorth!
Regards
Ken
PS: As Francois says - it is wiser to try both to see which of the 3 or 4 section fits your needs and taste - and further - which type of locking device you prefer.
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2003, 09:15:00 AM »
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Thanks for your add-on , Ken !
I tryed and bought the Manfrotto 444 (4 sections) yesterday, and as far I used it this morning, I'm happy with the feeling I have with it. Hope it will be confirmed in the future.
Greetings !

JF
One thing about lever-locks -- while they are certainly more convenient than Gitzo's twist locks, they are less dependable and can come loose!  DO NOT lose the wrench they gave you with the tripod that was so conveniently mounted on the leg in its own custom rack   In cold weather especially, the top portion of those lever locks have a tendency to come loose from the larger leg above and fall off.  This can be particularly disconcerting if your camera and lens is sitting on the pod at the time this happens   Take time to check the tension on all the lever clamps before every shoot -- that's why they give you the wrench and mount it so conspicuously on the tripod leg...

Cheers,
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JF
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« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2003, 04:54:33 PM »
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Hello !
I just finished to watch the Issue 8 from the Video Journal, and I really enjoyed it !
But sometime my english let me fall and in the chapter about balls heads, Michael speak about carbofiber tripods and I cant well understand witch he find better betwenn a 3 or a 4 section, he was so entousiastic that he was spoked to fast for a Swiss man like me :)
If you can help, thanks in advance !

JF
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JF
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« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2003, 04:22:17 PM »
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Thank you very much for your answer, Francois !

JF
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walkerr
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« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2003, 01:59:33 PM »
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I agree on the stability issue. I haven't seen a problem with the four-section tripods.

One other thing to consider is maximum height. If you get a 13 series Gitzo (which is what Michael uses in the DVD), the four-section tripod has a higher maximum height than the three-section equivalent, and his comment about flexibility on terrain is absolutely true. If you get an 11 or 12 series Gitzo, the reverse is true. For example, the three-section 1227 has a higher maximum height than the four-section 1228. You need to look carefully at the specs, and try to get something that minimizes the need to use the leg collars.

Finally, think about situations where you might want to travel with the tripod. For example, will you ever travel on an airplane with it? If so, you'll probably want to put it in checked luggage. Make sure you can fit your tripod in the luggage you plan to take. Tripods like the 1228 easily fit in a carry-on, but the 1227 can be a tougher fit.
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Rick
francois
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« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2003, 08:36:58 AM »
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One other thing to consider is maximum height. If you get a 13 series Gitzo (which is what Michael uses in the DVD), the four-section tripod has a higher maximum height than the three-section equivalent, and his comment about flexibility on terrain is absolutely true. If you get an 11 or 12 series Gitzo, the reverse is true. For example, the three-section 1227 has a higher maximum height than the four-section 1228.

So true! I am 6"4 (192cm) tall and the Gitzo 1348 puts the camera in the right place...

JF, where are you from?

francois
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Francois
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« Reply #8 on: October 10, 2003, 09:28:12 AM »
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If someone made me get a Gitzo tripod, I'd get a three-section just in order to minimize the use of those twist-locks. Much prefer flip-locks. Just my opinion.

I have both a Gitzo and a Manfrotto/Bogen tripods. Flip-locks are easier/faster [and almost foolproof] to use but I can live with twist-locks, they are not as bad.  

Users need to experiment to find what they need/like.

My 2ct.

Francois
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Francois
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« Reply #9 on: October 10, 2003, 09:36:35 AM »
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Users need to experiment to find what they need/like.
Right you are  :cool:

Jason
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Jason Elias
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francois
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« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2003, 06:14:45 AM »
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Francois, I live in Switzerland !

I'm also living in Switzerland [Lausanne area]!

Gitzo tripods can be found in some stores but it's true that Manfrotto are more popular.

francois
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Francois
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« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2003, 11:12:09 AM »
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The internet world is so little, Francois
I'm living in Vuadens but working in Prilly (west of Lausanne)

Meilleures salutations !

JF
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francois
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« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2003, 06:23:34 AM »
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The internet world is so little, Francois
I'm living in Vuadens but working in Prilly

So true!

I'm glad you found a tripod that seems to suit your photographic adventures.

francois    :cool:
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Francois
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« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2003, 09:29:55 AM »
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In cold weather especially, the top portion of those lever locks have a tendency to come loose from the larger leg above and fall off.

I also had that problem in very hot weather... I thought I was the only one.    


francois
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Francois
Jack Flesher
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« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2003, 10:31:08 AM »
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So I guess you have to decide which tradeoff you are willing to deal with; the continual hassel but bone-solid reliability of the Gitzo's twist leg-locks or the easy convenience but less reliable lever locks.  Probably six of one half-dozen of the other when you weigh them all out --
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francois
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« Reply #15 on: October 08, 2003, 04:30:40 AM »
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Hi JF,
Three-section tripods are faster to operate and a bit more rigid. Four-section generally pack smaller (not that much) and are sometimes longer. I'm using a Gitzo 1348 (4 section) and find the four sections not a problem.
In the VJ, Michael seems to like the four section Gitzo. He says it adds versatility over uneven terrains.
Opinions are ... opinions, you should try both to see which of the 3 or 4 section fits your needs and taste.


francois
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Francois
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« Reply #16 on: October 09, 2003, 05:34:07 PM »
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Thank you so much for your advices, Jack and Walkeer, I'm so glad to find in this forum so competent people that I registred !
I'll let you know what will be my choice, bur after what I read here, it probably will be a 4 sections

thanks again

JF
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Paradis
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« Reply #17 on: October 11, 2003, 12:27:34 PM »
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Francois, I live in Switzerland !
there is not realy easy to find Gitzo in my area, Manfrotto are a lot more usual, seems it looks good too, in 4 sections I foud the 440 and the 444, the 444 interest me more !

Greetings

JF
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Paradis
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« Reply #18 on: October 12, 2003, 11:26:00 AM »
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Thanks for your add-on , Ken !
I tryed and bought the Manfrotto 444 (4 sections) yesterday, and as far I used it this morning, I'm happy with the feeling I have with it. Hope it will be confirmed in the future.
Greetings !

JF
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Jack Flesher
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« Reply #19 on: October 13, 2003, 06:34:03 PM »
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I also had that problem in very hot weather... I thought I was the only one.  


francois
It makes sense...  the differences in thermal expansion between the material in the leg tubing and the material in the clamp is what causes this to happen -- hence the inclusion of the wrtench.  FWIW I know one guy who got so fed up with the problem he (carefully) epoxied the clamps to their respective legs
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