Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: I really don't know whether to give up  (Read 2943 times)
Roskav
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 245



WWW
« on: January 13, 2012, 01:31:22 PM »
ReplyReply

Or do a clean wipe of the computer... I've adopted C1 and more recently Media Pro.  Reason being ... nice nice raw conversion with adjustment layers and nice selective colour editing etc.  Media Pro ... straight out of the last century but potentially nice client workflow with Media Pro Reader.  The bad bits?  Lots of crashes where the computer doesn't even know it's crashed... a learning curve .. and realising how user friendly Aperture is.  Bad Bad relationship with the server RAIDs 
One weird one... I processed some leaf files into the output folder.. then cloned a bit in Photoshop... (opening from Bridge) .. Then back to C1 to make one of their nice web contact sheets.  The images still look unworked ... hmm click on one ... ah now the preview shows what I did in PS ... click on another one... hey the first file has now reverted to what it was before!  Make the web contact sheet ... C1 takes the trouble to do a bit of processing and preview generation .... of the original files!  I can't seem to find a "clear cache" or regenerate function that works... any clues?  .. because I really am thinking of just using bridge ACR and PS for everything again. 
Thanks for reading!
R
Logged

Roskav
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 245



WWW
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2012, 01:37:42 PM »
ReplyReply

.. ok deleted everything to do with C1 on the folder and that seems to have worked.
R
Logged

craigwashburn
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 118


« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2012, 02:15:25 PM »
ReplyReply

.. ok deleted everything to do with C1 on the folder and that seems to have worked.
R


I find C1's web contact sheets to be frustrating and buggy, especially with files you've processed outside of C1.
Logged
mistybreeze
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 177


« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2012, 06:12:07 AM »
ReplyReply

Capture One is a buggy program. It has always been a buggy program. I hate buggy programs, and I hate being interrupted in a shoot because the tech says we have to wait on or reboot C1. For my tastes, it happens way too much to tolerate. But every leading advertising photographer in NYC and L.A. tolerates it, and they've been tolerating it since 1998, when it was called Portrait One. Toleration probably has something to do with Capture One's relationship with the medium format camera community, the software's pioneer tether capability, and the critical acclaim of their RAW processor.

On the other hand, if you even suggest shooting tethered to Lightroom, your $1500-a-day tech guy will look at you with crossed eyes, and you'll notice steam coming out of his ears as he shakes his head screaming, "NO WAY." Either he doesn't have a clue how to run Lightroom (yet, he uses it at home), or he can't believe you even suggested using Lightroom on a "professional" shoot.

It's a bizarre phenomenon. Every million dollar photographer I know is a tool snob yet they tolerate an utterly buggy tool for their million dollar photography campaigns.

Many leading professionals, the serious money makers, swear that the C1 RAW processor is the best. For some, this is the only reason to stay loyal to the program. Pros say they tolerate the bugs because their medium format images jump off the screen and strangle onlookers into viewing ecstasy. And some of C1's tools, like: controlling the camera and lights from the software, Pick Color Correction, Keystone Correction, etc., have grown into truly useful gems, unique enough to keep loyalists devoted.

Some leading tech assistants will admit privately that Lightroom has improved since its debut in 2006. But in the same breath they will complain that Adobe did not include tether capability from day one, and accuse Adobe of abandoning the pro community by turning to the mass market, the i-Phone/Flickr/Facebook photo takers, to sustain and finance their future. Nobody wants to see Adobe die but pros have touchy egos.

Pros in advertising want their own tools. This is no secret and it's always been this way. They don't want to be seen in important settings using something that every other Tom, Dick, and Sally are using, no matter how great it is. Some say Adobe made a big mistake by not creating two Lightroom programs, one for professional tethered users and one for everyone else.

What does the future hold? If the economy improves and the medium format camera industry grows, Capture One could find funding for better engineers. There isn't much money in serving the software needs of the professional community but at least Capture One continues to try.
Logged
Keith Reeder
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 253


WWW
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2012, 09:25:44 AM »
ReplyReply

Capture One is a buggy program. It has always been a buggy program.

I've used Capture One since v. 3 and it has never, ever been anything other than completely rock solid on every machine I've ever loaded it onto.
Logged

Keith Reeder
Blyth, NE England
robgo2
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 348


WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2012, 02:10:36 PM »
ReplyReply

Capture One is a buggy program. It has always been a buggy program. I hate buggy programs, and I hate being interrupted in a shoot because the tech says we have to wait on or reboot C1. For my tastes, it happens way too much to tolerate. But every leading advertising photographer in NYC and L.A. tolerates it, and they've been tolerating it since 1998, when it was called Portrait One. Toleration probably has something to do with Capture One's relationship with the medium format camera community, the software's pioneer tether capability, and the critical acclaim of their RAW processor.

On the other hand, if you even suggest shooting tethered to Lightroom, your $1500-a-day tech guy will look at you with crossed eyes, and you'll notice steam coming out of his ears as he shakes his head screaming, "NO WAY." Either he doesn't have a clue how to run Lightroom (yet, he uses it at home), or he can't believe you even suggested using Lightroom on a "professional" shoot.

It's a bizarre phenomenon. Every million dollar photographer I know is a tool snob yet they tolerate an utterly buggy tool for their million dollar photography campaigns.

Many leading professionals, the serious money makers, swear that the C1 RAW processor is the best. For some, this is the only reason to stay loyal to the program. Pros say they tolerate the bugs because their medium format images jump off the screen and strangle onlookers into viewing ecstasy. And some of C1's tools, like: controlling the camera and lights from the software, Pick Color Correction, Keystone Correction, etc., have grown into truly useful gems, unique enough to keep loyalists devoted.

Some leading tech assistants will admit privately that Lightroom has improved since its debut in 2006. But in the same breath they will complain that Adobe did not include tether capability from day one, and accuse Adobe of abandoning the pro community by turning to the mass market, the i-Phone/Flickr/Facebook photo takers, to sustain and finance their future. Nobody wants to see Adobe die but pros have touchy egos.

Pros in advertising want their own tools. This is no secret and it's always been this way. They don't want to be seen in important settings using something that every other Tom, Dick, and Sally are using, no matter how great it is. Some say Adobe made a big mistake by not creating two Lightroom programs, one for professional tethered users and one for everyone else.

What does the future hold? If the economy improves and the medium format camera industry grows, Capture One could find funding for better engineers. There isn't much money in serving the software needs of the professional community but at least Capture One continues to try.

I'm an amateur, but last year I ran into a big-time commercial photographer at Samy's Camera in Los Angeles.  He told me that he personally prefers Lightroom, because it is familiar to him, but that all of the top professional photo retouchers that he knows use Capture One.  Why?  Better output.

In my own experience, I have found Capture One and Media Pro to be somewhat buggy, but at the present moment, both are running smoothly on my system.  I am a bit anxious about upcoming major updates, but I will cross that bridge when I come to it.

Rob
Logged
ComputerDork
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 37

Nikon D7000, C1, LR, PS, Film, Dorkery


« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2012, 07:45:58 PM »
ReplyReply

I just started using C1 on my macbook for tethered capture. I've had problems with my camera (Nikon D7000) disconnecting at random while tethered. (And when this happened I did check to make sure other software could "see" the camera plugged in, and the camera was in fact still connected to USB according to the OS.) No apparent cause at all, unless maybe other apps running in the background stole the CPU for too long or something. Based on that theory I started quitting all apps while using C1 for tethered capture, and I havent shot much since then but so far no disconnections or failures to connect when first plugged in.

I've also had the thing lock up a couple of times, and had the camera disconnect when switching workspaces, all of which required quitting/killing it and rerunning it, but luckily I haven't seen that since rebooting and closing all other apps while tethering. All of the lockups seemed to involve tethering.

I ran into some situation where the Process button didn't seem to do anything. (Processing output never started even though the recipe, etc, was obviously configured.) Switching sessions or workspaces back and forth or quitting/restarting seemed to fix that.

My guess is that camera problems are all specific to their camera drivers. Is the windows version less or more buggy than the OS X version?
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad