Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 ... 72 73 [74]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Epson 7900 from the inside - out  (Read 355173 times)
Calvin Powell
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #1460 on: October 09, 2014, 12:18:19 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi, i didn't want to start a new thread because is my problem is also with the 7900, i hope i'm not breaking form rules here, however after spending some time researching this, and coming across this thread, this thread seems to have the most information clustered together i've seen.

So on our 7900 we developed a clog on the LLK head, and its not a very small clog, its almost 80-90% of the head, and its only getting worse, with less than 200-ish prints on the printer its self, and none of the others going bad.

So far we have been trying the different ranks of cleaning the printer has, including checking the wiper-blade assembly. and no SS cleaning,(after searching this form, thank you btw) and the LLk has only gotten worse. I fear is electronics, as it seems to be with a-lot of these print heads.

I know there are lots of other things we could try, damper assembly, different cleaning liquids you run instead of inks, but this block is huge and i haven't seen anyone with this massive of a clog on just one head.

What do you guys think.
Logged
davidh202
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 551


« Reply #1461 on: October 09, 2014, 09:52:22 PM »
ReplyReply

You don't have a clog you have ink starvation due to air in the line. It's also not the wiper. I'd be willing to bet it's a bad cart seal allowing air into the line.  Could be a bad cart seal or the needle itself in the LLK bay. LLK is the most used ink for all prints. If you have any carts running at a very low level this can also occur, as it can de pressurize the supply chain and affect the weakest link so to speak.  
You have nothing to loose before you call for service if out of warrantee...
 Get a new 150ml LLK cart before you do anything else, set the printer to auto check and nozzle clean,  and let the printer do it's thing. You may get the dreaded cleaned 3 times to no avail notice, let the printer rest between cleanings and turn it off and on to cycle the pressure pump and charge the lines. Do not just keep on doing cleanings without printing , but print some more  pages on plain paper till it works it's way out!
IF all that fails open in Maintenance mode and do a level 2 pair clean only, and then print print print on plain paper. If you see progress fine, if not you may have already done too much damage to the LLK nozzles . DO not use WINDEX!  
Good luck and by all means report back and let us know the outcome
  
« Last Edit: October 09, 2014, 10:10:30 PM by davidh202 » Logged
fetish
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


« Reply #1462 on: October 15, 2014, 07:48:38 PM »
ReplyReply

You don't have a clog you have ink starvation due to air in the line. It's also not the wiper. I'd be willing to bet it's a bad cart seal allowing air into the line.  Could be a bad cart seal or the needle itself in the LLK bay. LLK is the most used ink for all prints. If you have any carts running at a very low level this can also occur, as it can de pressurize the supply chain and affect the weakest link so to speak. 
You have nothing to loose before you call for service if out of warrantee...
 Get a new 150ml LLK cart before you do anything else, set the printer to auto check and nozzle clean,  and let the printer do it's thing. You may get the dreaded cleaned 3 times to no avail notice, let the printer rest between cleanings and turn it off and on to cycle the pressure pump and charge the lines. Do not just keep on doing cleanings without printing , but print some more  pages on plain paper till it works it's way out!
IF all that fails open in Maintenance mode and do a level 2 pair clean only, and then print print print on plain paper. If you see progress fine, if not you may have already done too much damage to the LLK nozzles . DO not use WINDEX! 
Good luck and by all means report back and let us know the outcome
   

Yup it's a bad cart seal. Just use some scotch tape and tape up the seams around the cart. It helps to hold it for a while. Also, do an eject cart and reload then clean once to get the pressure up before doing a nozzle check when doing a new print job after the printer sits idle for more than a day.
Logged
Some Guy
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 393


« Reply #1463 on: October 15, 2014, 08:24:11 PM »
ReplyReply

Just a thought, if it were an air leak, wouldn't the pump be running a lot more than normal?  Maybe continuously if bad enough?

I think Epson has some pressure sensor on the air line to keep the tanks and head pressurized and it should be triggering the pump if the line pressure is low, or the pressure sensor is bad.

Local shop had theirs go bad and it did clog the nozzles, but they also had to change out some controller board, pump, and print head to the tune of $2,200 with labor.  They scraped it instead and upscaled to the 9900, but it too had some issues as well and has been down 3 months.

Epson really needs to make these machines more service and user friendly with regards to head replacements like Canon, imho.

SG
Logged
fetish
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 153


« Reply #1464 on: October 16, 2014, 06:21:21 AM »
ReplyReply

How do you do this exactly? Are you saying to tape around near where the cart plugs in to the nozzle? How can you do this with the other carts in? Could you be a bit more clear...I want to try this....

You see the seam that runs down the middle of the cartridge that splits the cart in two? Tape up that seam. Just be more careful to avoid the chip, the ink port and the plastic identification keys.

Secondary action: release the head and move it to the middle of the printer, use a torch to inspect the ink lines around it to see if there are signs of ink leakages. Sometimes one of the ink line is not plugged in tight enough and the leak will cause air to build up in the head.
Logged
datro
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 55


« Reply #1465 on: October 16, 2014, 02:40:11 PM »
ReplyReply

...
What do you guys think.

It is hard to see in your photograph, but I think I see deflected nozzles (small curved vertical lines of ink in the missing color just to the right of the left and right sides of the empty pattern). You may need to look at the pattern under magnification to see this.

Based on my experience you have a failed head, not a clog.  You have 2 key indicators:  1) a continuous block of missing nozzles that gets larger with more attempts to clear it, 2) deflected nozzles with "delayed" firing.

I had pretty much the same thing happen on my 5 1/2 year old 7900 in the Green channel.  Up until that point, I had never had a missing nozzle which could not be easily cleared.  I installed a new Ink Selector (all five dampers) which did not fix it.  A 72 hour soak with PeizoFlush fluid in the Green channel did not clear it.  I installed a new head (did all the recommended adjustments) and now have a perfectly functioning system again.  Note:  If you do replace your head, and if you build your own profiles, I highly recommend re-profiling all your papers.  Replacing a head can actually change color characteristics in the same way that changing media settings might.

Dave
Logged
Pages: « 1 ... 72 73 [74]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad