Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 ... 49 50 [51] 52 53 ... 74 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Epson 7900 from the inside - out  (Read 262748 times)
sfblue
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 63


WWW
« Reply #1000 on: December 12, 2012, 06:55:32 PM »
ReplyReply

ahh, got it.  No worries-- I did not drain the ink. I have some paranoia about putting in a new printhead and having the same issue, so part of me wants to start with new ink as by now the ink in the tubes has been sitting around for a while and I'm trying to eliminate reasons for instant re-clogging.  But . . . I won't drain the inks.

And the top cover came off.  It was just stuck for some reason and took a little shake in the right direction. 
Logged
Blue moon
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


« Reply #1001 on: December 13, 2012, 10:37:45 AM »
ReplyReply

There is a way to use Vivid Magenta in x800 machines. You can download the x880 driver and use the new driver for the x800. There is a few configurations that you need to make in the printer property in order to make it work. No color shift in this method.


Thanks
Will download a driver ...
I have two 220mls so you done me a lot of good  Grin
Logged
Denniswcr
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 28


« Reply #1002 on: December 13, 2012, 02:45:49 PM »
ReplyReply

I just bought my 2 year extended warrantee today!
Logged
Eric Gulbransen
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


never surrender


WWW
« Reply #1003 on: December 14, 2012, 04:48:40 PM »
ReplyReply

Whitedogphotos came through.  His terminally clogged 7900 head just arrived at my place, in it's casket. 

Thank you brother.

LET THE GAMES BEGIN!!!
Logged

JimGoshorn
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 169



« Reply #1004 on: December 14, 2012, 06:39:06 PM »
ReplyReply

I just bought my 2 year extended warrantee today!

I didn't buy an extended warranty (7600 and 7800 worked well) and boy do I regret it now with one of the now infamous head replacing clogs. I would now consider an extended warranty a given with the newer printers.

Jim
Logged
Eric Gulbransen
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


never surrender


WWW
« Reply #1005 on: December 14, 2012, 08:10:35 PM »
ReplyReply

We need to start compiling a deadheads list.  Who, where, how, and after how long.  I think that'd be useful.  I can name ten deadheads off the top of my head (sorry). 

For what it's worth our 7900 had abandoned it's typical "clog every other day" routine at just about the same time the rainy season started here.  I did buy a gauge, it's been hovering around 80% humidity and 58-67F around the machine for weeks now.  Not ONE clog.   ...until my genius came over and decided to print a bit on William Turner matte.  Soon as he swapped from PK to MK, and then back again only thirty minutes later, all things became different again.  Or, should I say "the same again".

 
Logged

Denniswcr
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 28


« Reply #1006 on: December 14, 2012, 10:06:23 PM »
ReplyReply


For what it's worth our 7900 had abandoned it's typical "clog every other day" routine at just about the same time the rainy season started here.  I did buy a gauge, it's been hovering around 80% humidity and 58-67F around the machine for weeks now.  

I was about to post the same thing.  Had many small clogs that would clean out okay.  Recently though, now that the temp has dropped and the humidity is up, there have been no clogs.  This 7900 is about 1 year old and still on the startup cartridges for most inks and they are sitting around 5-9% and shows how low the usage has been.
Logged
Chris233
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 58


« Reply #1007 on: December 19, 2012, 07:52:40 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi Eric,

Looks like you've been having some fun with the printhead.  Thanks for posting the pics!  I'm attaching a document that should help understanding the inner workings of what you're seeing.  Also, here is a link for you which should be a good read if you're curious.  http://doc.utwente.nl/58366/1/thesis_Wijshoff.pdf  Granted, they are a little dated...  Smiley

All the best,

Chris
« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 08:07:16 AM by Chris233 » Logged
Bill Ellzey
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #1008 on: December 19, 2012, 06:04:10 PM »
ReplyReply

I'm one of the clan (sorry to say), a 7900 cloghead.  Just discovered this thread, spent a few hours reading and still didn't reach the end.  What a stalwart band of brothers (and sister) you've become since January.  I'm a bit ecstatic to discover that there are actually possibilities of resurrecting my 7900.  Eric, you're amazing.  I'm plenty techy enough to tackle the viscera of the unit.  However I just Googled 7900sm.pdf as suggested, only to read, "This account has been suspended."  Makes one wonder if they're actually working against us.  Anyway, if anyone was able to download the pdf before it disappeared, I'd be mighty beholding if you'd send me a copy.  bill@billellzey.com
Sleeves rolled up, scrubbed and sterile, waiting for operating instructions.  Gracias.
Logged
enduser
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 258


« Reply #1009 on: December 19, 2012, 07:45:14 PM »
ReplyReply

A quick scan of the literature in the post above is interesting to me, because, given the large list of early research by many companies, it's surprising how few now produce professional wide format photographic machines.
Logged
JimGoshorn
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 169



« Reply #1010 on: December 20, 2012, 01:14:58 PM »
ReplyReply

We need to start compiling a deadheads list.  Who, where, how, and after how long.  I think that'd be useful.  I can name ten deadheads off the top of my head (sorry).

Have to wonder how many of the heads have already been replaced that should have been added to such a list.

Jim
Logged
Bill Ellzey
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #1011 on: December 20, 2012, 02:13:51 PM »
ReplyReply

Anybody have a copy of 7900sm.pdf that you could send me?  bill@billellzey.com
Someone has pulled if from the web.
Thanks much,
Bill
Logged
Lessbones
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #1012 on: December 20, 2012, 05:40:09 PM »
ReplyReply

Anybody have a copy of 7900sm.pdf that you could send me?  bill@billellzey.com
Someone has pulled if from the web.
Thanks much,
Bill

If it's the service manual you are looking for, it's quite easy to find by simply googling "epson 7900 service manual"
Logged
JeffW
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 49


« Reply #1013 on: December 20, 2012, 06:44:21 PM »
ReplyReply

So back to QTR, does it give you the ability to fire individual jets? If so, it would be great to concentrate on just firing those jets that are plugged and hopefully wasting less ink.
Logged
Chris233
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 58


« Reply #1014 on: December 20, 2012, 08:51:07 PM »
ReplyReply

Eilzey,

You can download the service manual here:
http://seiko.fishbone.gr.jp/~toshi/Epson/service%20manual/inkjet/stylus%20pro%207900%207910%209900%209910%20PX-H8000%2010000%20service%20manual.pdf

But I think the Field Repair Guide will provide what you need, here:  which is from 10/6/2010...
http://seiko.fishbone.gr.jp/~toshi/Epson/service%20manual/inkjet/stylus%20pro%207900%209900%20Field%20Repair%20Guide.pdf

Jeff,

There is no way to fire individual jets... not even with RIP.  You'll need the Printhead Diagnostic software for that.  Maybe emailing the author of the literature I posted above could help, or another scientist.  I cannot post what you are seeking.

You can always try the Paired Power Cleaning.  I have found, though... doing manual ink pull from the maintenance tank tubes (closing 1 tube with hemostat) while the machine is powered ON, does provide stronger pull and better results.  Be careful, though.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2012, 09:00:30 PM by Chris233 » Logged
cybis
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 131



WWW
« Reply #1015 on: December 20, 2012, 10:57:53 PM »
ReplyReply

So back to QTR, does it give you the ability to fire individual jets? If so, it would be great to concentrate on just firing those jets that are plugged and hopefully wasting less ink.
Qtr allows you to fire individual channels but not individual nozzles.
Logged

Eric Gulbransen
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


never surrender


WWW
« Reply #1016 on: December 21, 2012, 12:25:38 AM »
ReplyReply

I apologize for the silence.  Christmas has me bonkers.  Chris I love you for sending us this paper on print head technology.  I am up to my ears in it right now.  What a gem. 

Anyone need specific help email me directly.

Anyone looking into DIY X900 printhead soaking routines consider this textual dissection of your printhead:

1 - outer most element = cage protecting your printhead face from paper strikes
2 - next level = printhead face - thin foil-like sheet with holes for each nozzle
2 - next level = channel pair module - each module has two channels.  Each module draws ink from two chambers just below it, one for each color.  (each module has layers of micro mechanical intricacy going on inside it, which I will get into later)
3 - next level = ink path chambers/tunnels (how ink gets to channel pair modules)
4 - next level = ink intake ports (where ink enters chambers/tunnels)
5 - next level = ink line receiver plate (removable plastic nipple plate which connects ink lines to intake ports)
6 - next level = ink lines

I made all these names up, to protect the innocent.  They are appropriate. 

Everything about these X900 printheads is standard technology, barring the channel pair modules.  I have yet to dissect a terminally clogged printhead with Santa's Elves tugging at my cape.  But don't think I haven't been dreaming about it.  One key discovery happened at level 5.  The ink line receiver plates are removable.  The removal of these plates creates greater/easier access to the undersea world of your channel pair modules.  Before you remove these plates you can only get about 3/4 of an inch from the ink behind the modules, and that has to be through the nipple fittings of the receiver plate.  Once this plate is removed though, you are far closer.  Why does this matter?  Now you can soak the vital clog-prone parts without jeopardizing the liquid sensitive electronics portions of the head. 

The Piezoelectric elements of the head need current in order to fire (flex).  That's what the thin, wide, ribbon connectors carry to the head - current.  And lots of it.  Think of all the nozzles there are in there (math help please..).  All of these tiny lines of current come from the ribbon cable, connect to the head at what could be referred to as a junction box connector.  Bad name, I get it, but stay with me here.  All of this junction box connector is un-sealed, right out in the open so you can jam the ribbon cable into it, then it all dives into plastic land inside the top wall of the head framework.  Somewhere inside this wall, still at least an inch from level 3, the junction box now sends hundreds of tiny power lines to all the different channel pair modules.  Also somewhere inside this wall all these lines turn from being open to outside air, to being encased in a clear silicone-like substance.  I will upload images when I have more time but for now just understand that all electronics from the junction box all the way to the channel pair modules, is waterproof.  That is enough information for me to understand that you can safely soak more than just the very face of your printhead while attempting to clear a deadly clog.

Up until recently I had visions of adapting hoses to the level 5 ink line receiver plates, in order to massage fluid past dried clogs to loosen them up.  One concern here is an unknown pressure tolerance that the piezoelectrics can endure.  For sure some pressure, because the printer itself sucks ink through the printhead face during some cleanings, but I don't know how much - which is scary.  But now that I understand the level 5 ink line receiver plate comes off, and the electrics are waterproof (inkproof actually), I have abandoned my plan to force fluid anywhere.  Simple soaking is my intent.  At least the first go around.

Sorry if this is hard to follow, pet names and all.  You should try it under a microscope..

Logged

Blue moon
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 92


« Reply #1017 on: December 23, 2012, 05:50:43 AM »
ReplyReply

Hi Eric,

Looks like you've been having some fun with the printhead.  Thanks for posting the pics!  I'm attaching a document that should help understanding the inner workings of what you're seeing.  Also, here is a link for you which should be a good read if you're curious.  http://doc.utwente.nl/58366/1/thesis_Wijshoff.pdf  Granted, they are a little dated...  Smiley

All the best,

Chris
Hi Chris
Thanks for info on printer head.....huge research going on about making the head more efficient...
When the nozzles were doubled in the x900 series....it appears that the piezo unit itself had to be made much more flexible to deliver power for printing....this extra flexibility meant that the materials used became much thinner and i suppose more brittle and prone to damage faster...
Also what i found interesting in the thesis was the ability of the printhead to suck back air bubbles into the head when there is an accumulation of excess ink or stale ink "pooling " on the head surface at the nozzles...where is our wiper blade system and why does it not prevent "pooling" ?
I have removed air successfully by power cleaning....i have seen the air bubbles in the cleaning solution after the power clean...but not for individual nozzles..(that is if it is air in the individual nozzles )
What i was surprised at was there was no mention  in the thesis of the ink waste disposal method and how effective this method is in preventing stale ink or air bubbles getting back into the head itself..
It just seems that all the research is going into the head itself and very little thought is going into the problem of disposing of waste ink intelligently ..
Dirt was also mentioned as a reason for nozzle blocking ...possibly good hygiene habits is the only way to keep the dirt problem at bay and i guess check and replace dampers too..
Eric ..you mentioned pumping pressure worries...in another world i know that putting water into a house (i am involved in a rural water scheme project ) at greater that 3 bar pressure is looking for trouble....i seem to remember that the pressure used to flush out your piezo head was 5 bar which sounds strong..
Possibly a pressure somewhat similar to the pressure Epson use to move ink through the head would be the max to go for....is that information  out there ? Anyway you are going the " soak "route
Logged
kdphotography
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 688


WWW
« Reply #1018 on: December 23, 2012, 11:45:16 PM »
ReplyReply

I thought these articles from Jon Cone are helpful tips on printer maintenance:  http://www.inkjetmall.com/wordpress/category/maintenance/
...notably on humidity, infrequent printer use, and head strikes.

I haven't had any problems with my 9900, but I also use my 9900 very regularly and humidity levels are kept fairly constant in studio...

ken
Logged

Eric Gulbransen
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 298


never surrender


WWW
« Reply #1019 on: December 27, 2012, 12:32:28 PM »
ReplyReply

Here comes the New Year - here comes new X900 printhead discoveries..

HUMIDITY:  I mentioned a few weeks ago that since the rainy season began we have been seeing fewer clogs.  Much fewer clogs.  I hoped we were out of the woods, at least for winter.  I was wrong.  The clogs came back pretty regular again.  It got colder, I turned up the heat, the heat dried out the air, the clogs came back.  This is not my news.  My news (part of my news) is I recorded what changed, when, and why.  Epson suggests keeping your X900 in an environment with 40-60% relative humidity.  I bought a gauge and have monitored the regularity of clogging during the varying states of the environment around our 7900.  40-60% humidity does not work for me, it seems I need more humidity.  When my gauge reads 80% our 7900 is virtually clog-free.  A few of you have emailed me with details about your X900 clogging results in your own varying environments, the most successful stories also being in the neighborhood of 80%.  The problem one user had with keeping his studio (room in house) this humid was he got mold - then the humidifier got excommunicated to a dusty corner in the garage.  Once back to a more human-friendly environment, he was again back to clogging.  I've read about humidifiers but not tried one.  Apparently they take a lot of work to run - sometimes needing to be filled with water (one gallon) four times in one day.  For me this is not possible.  But all this new relative humidity data and how it specifically relates to our 7900 clogging, did get me to thinking (re-thinking actually) about an old idea I had months ago to enclose our 7900 in it's own micro-environment.  So I broke out my old high school graduation present, a Singer Sewing Machine (no comment), and fabricated a prototype cover out of some 6ml poly I had left over from a staining job.  I took two cookie sheets, filled them with water and set them on the floor inside the cover/under the printer.  I put two gauges on top of the machine - one inside the cover in the micro-climate, the other outside the cover.  The two gauges are only six inches apart.  So far (two days) I see @12% difference in humidity from inside the cover to outside the cover.  When the room is 65%, the machine is 80%.  So the idea has potential.  It's a pretty sloppy prototype too - doesn't reach the floor in the back in some areas.  I am confident this idea can produce better results.








« Last Edit: December 27, 2012, 12:33:59 PM by Eric Gulbransen » Logged

Pages: « 1 ... 49 50 [51] 52 53 ... 74 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad