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Author Topic: Video - Wet Mounting Film for Drum Scanning  (Read 1407 times)
Mr.Gale
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« on: January 26, 2012, 08:13:08 PM »
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Over the years I have been asked several times to describe how I mount film so I decided to make a video. I just posted it to YouTube (http://youtu.be/aCHS5yiF4Mc ).
Questions and comment are welcome. Just remember, this is how I DO IT, I'm not saying it is the best way, the only way or the fastest way.
One comment I have received states that my method is "painful for me to watch as it was much too laborious than necessary". My intentions were never to cause anyone pain :-). In real time it takes me ~10 minutes too load a drum.
Thanks,

Gale

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Brian Hirschfeld
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« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2012, 09:07:28 PM »
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Some thoughts I am writing these as I watch it (also I have never drum scanned anything myself for the sake of full disclosure):

- maybe links to the products you talk about would be nice,
- editing to get rid of the parts where you get up to change things (not a major issue, just would make it flow better if you ask me)
- an online link to the gird you made for use on your Lightbox when mounting might be a nice touch to help people
- you name the anti-static fluid you use for wiping your plastic grid, but you don't mention the cloth
- maybe show tacking down the corners once for a full image then cut to the end when they are all mounted, but again not a big deal, more information never killed (I know you only showed doing it to 2 but just a thought)
- yes when your making a video, everything goes wrong, trust me, its why I only have one video on my youtube channel.
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I thought it was very detailed and well explained, the only pain I felt was from the costochondritis I am suffering through....after watching this, I totally appreciate the pricing structure of people who offering drum scanning services....very very good video, I have watched all of it, this is the sort of quality information on high-end photographic processes which is truly lacking in the world. I would also consider uploading it to Vimeo to A) increase exposure to is and B) its a generally more respected site for higher-quality videos.

very thorough yet honest... i.e. you show everything in great depth showing knowledge and precision but still say things like "loose a bit of film, no big deal....showing your realistic and not insanely perfectionist to the point that it gets in the way of demonstrating and explaining

really liked it
« Last Edit: January 26, 2012, 09:10:06 PM by Brian Hirchfeld » Logged

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Alan Klein
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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2012, 10:02:16 PM »
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Bob:  Great video and service.  I don't drum scan but it is a complicated process, I see.  I thought my Epson V600 flat bed was a pain in the neck, but the drum sure is a lot more complicated.  Thanks for taking the time to do the video which by the way was very clear (what did you video it with?)  I'd really love to seen some of the results of your scans.  Do you have a link to any of your photos?  Thanks. Alan.
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Mr.Gale
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« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2012, 11:51:59 AM »
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Thanks Brian and Alan for your comments. If I ever make another video I would do a lot of things differently. Most important,  make it into chapters. With chapters if one has some problems it would be easier to re-tape it and replace the other.
Brian:
For supplies, http://www.aztek.com/, http://scanscience.com/index.html. The tape I like is 3M 850 - 3/4" . I'm not sure what Prazio still sells, I should email them and find out. http://www.prazio.com/
I know the video could use a lot of editing but I don't know how. I put it together using Windows Live Movie Maker which does have editing tools but I was having a hard time figuring them out so I gave up.
The grid I used I made in Photoshop and then printed it on Mylar using my HP Lazar printer.

Alan:
Darn, the video was suppose to show how easy it is to wet mounting. :-)
I used my Canon 7D with a 16-35mm lens.

Thanks again,
Gale
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pfigen
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2012, 12:03:36 AM »
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Having mounted thousands of pieces of film on several different drum scanners, this was interesting. Personally I think mounting to the overlay first and then to the drum, the way you did, which is a method I used to see in old prepress shops, is extremely slow and tedious. I tried it a few times and found it not very efficient. I think I would have had my scans completely done by the time your film was finally on the drum.

I like to tape the film to the drum itself first, then tape a piece of overlay material over, starting at the top. Then apply Kami on both sides of the film and tape the trailing center first, then the pull the corner out and down with tape, finally taping the sides and bottom fully. It's actually been many years since I've even used the roller on my mounting station, which I'm sure some people find odd.

I think I would be very very careful about putting any polishing compound on the drum itself. Repeated applications could affect the annealed surface of the drum, inviting problems with faster evaporating drum fluids and cleaners.

Congratulations on documenting your mounting process. I see only one other video on the subject and his techniques are different from yours or mine.
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