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Author Topic: No Canvas Print Allowed and Forced Limited Edition Rules?  (Read 10997 times)
Jim Coda
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« Reply #20 on: March 11, 2012, 02:25:22 PM »
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I am prepping for my first art fair shows this year.


I'm not sure if you're prepping for your first shows ever or the early shows for this year.  If you haven't done these before then I recommend you do some research on each show you're thinking of entering.  Contact the photographers from last year and ask them how they did and go to the shows this year that you're thinking of entering next year to find out how the photographers are doing.  It's hard to make money at most of the shows and they are a lot of work.   In my area (San Francisco Bay Area) the number of good photographers that are doing the typical city/town art show has fallen precipitously due, I assume, to the economy.  They've been replaced by those selling t-shirts and toe rings.   

Even the shows with big reputations in the S.F. Bay Area that charge high booth fees and an entrance fee seem to have been hard-hit.  I went to the Sausalito Art Show in September 2010 and the photographers I talked to were complaining about having made hardly any money. 

 
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Johnny_Boy
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« Reply #21 on: March 11, 2012, 04:17:43 PM »
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I'm not sure if you're prepping for your first shows ever or the early shows for this year.  

It would be my first show EVER! :-) I have done quite a bit of research so far and talked to a lot of experienced folks here in LuLa to get some tips. Folks have been very helpful here on LuLa.

I picked three shows that I research quite a lot about, but I was thinking ahead about other shows in the near region for the next year.

I thought about emailing previous photographers on the shows and asking them like you suggested, but I wasn't sure if they will be forth coming, as I will be their competitors. Thoughts? I purchased and read the Art Festival Guide book and it seems to indicate that most show folks are weary of sharing any info with the new comers for various reasons.
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Jim Coda
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« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2012, 05:50:51 PM »
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I thought about emailing previous photographers on the shows and asking them like you suggested, but I wasn't sure if they will be forth coming, as I will be their competitors. Thoughts? I purchased and read the Art Festival Guide book and it seems to indicate that most show folks are weary of sharing any info with the new comers for various reasons.


I wouldn't hesitate to ask them.  You've got nothing to lose.  A phone call might get you a better answer than an e-mail.  Try to go to Portland and/or Bend this year.  I'd wait until Sunday afternoon to talk to them.  Most people will talk if they aren't busy.   You'll get to see what others are selling and you'll learn how you stack up against the competition.  If there doesn't seem to be much serious competition it may mean you could do well there, but it could also mean the show doesn't attract people interested in buying art and the good artists figured that out long ago.  Needless to say, those shows are to be avoided.   
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framah
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« Reply #23 on: March 16, 2012, 12:36:25 PM »
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In regards to printing on canvas, I can not find words to express the deep remorse and self-loathing I feel at the end of the day as I run the credit card batch file.

Picture a Chris Matthews "HA!" here!!
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"It took a  lifetime of suffering and personal sacrifice to develop my keen aesthetic sense."
JohnBrew
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« Reply #24 on: March 16, 2012, 08:02:54 PM »
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I have never made a photographic print on “canvas”. Why not? Because doing so is tantamount to mimicking/borrowing from painting. I believe photography after all these years should be appreciated for its own strengths, not by aping another aesthetic process.

0.02.  Grin

Ditto. I could not have said it better.
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louoates
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« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2012, 10:16:05 AM »
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When I'm selling photographs at an art show, a gallery, or from my home studio or web site I have a business. If I were to ignore requests to make canvas prints for customers my business would suffer.  So I'm happy to provide what the market is demanding. And I make a larger profit margin per sale.
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leuallen
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« Reply #26 on: March 23, 2012, 01:14:37 PM »
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I make images - just so happens that photography is the only means I have any skill at achieving a result. If a canvas print enhances my image over other means, so be it. If a fine black and white on a good paper fits the image better, that is fine also.

Larry
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Jim Coda
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« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2012, 11:44:01 AM »
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I am prepping for my first art fair shows this year. While I am based in Washington, I am planning to hit some of the Oregon shows next year. I’ve noticed that a show in Portland says no photographic print on canvas allowed, and another show in Bend has a requirement saying the photographic prints must have limited edition of 250 or less.

Is this a large trend in general for these type of venue? Why would canvas print not allowed? And why enforce limited edition?


Here is a great forum for you:  http://artshowforums.com/forum/

One thread had a discussion on canvas bans. Sorry, I don't recall the title of the thread, but "canvas" was probably in the title.
 
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philbaum
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« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2012, 09:24:25 AM »
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Hey!  I make big prints on canvas because it's the only sane way to make really big prints!  No glass, just for starters!  That's exactly the reason oil painters use canvas, although many of them would actually prefer to be using board.  And the only way I could TRULY distinguish my photography as a unique art form is if I was making Daguerreotypes which is just too boring.   Smiley
.....
The majority of the public has no acceptance problems at all with photos on canvas versus oils on canvas, they just buy the image that moves them the most.  Or the art that best color coordinates with the sofa...

Bill - I agree.  The reasons i went to canvas were not to imitate painters, but:
a. weight, large canvas prints are much easier handled and transported than traditional framed prints.

b. Some show organizers don't allow glass over prints, especially if its going to be mailed in.  I had a 1' by 3' framed print that the customer dropped while taking it off the display wall.  shattered the glass and frame - whoops - don't want that now :-)

c. Reflections - its so nice to be able to view a print without all those reflections on the surface that come with glass and even plex to some degree. Museum glass is so expensive.

d. As far as "purity" goes, a lot of painters are scanning their paintings, and using that digital jpeg to make additional ink-jet printed "painted" canvases.  There's nothing wrong with that, IMO, but its certainly not "traditional" to use ink jet printers for paintings.

e. I just got back from an artist's reception at the Edmonds, WA, art and crafts fair.  I'd guess about 10% of the photography was in canvas, at least i can remember 5.

f. In April i had a show of 16 canvas prints in Port Townsend, WA, at a local shop.  I sold 4 prints, and 5 members of the adjacent co-op gallery came by during the art walk night to invite me to join their gallery.  Canvas is still not going to sell your prints if the content is not there, of course.  And it does raise costs.  I belong to the PT Photo Club, and members there have been very supportive of canvas, a few going that way themselves.

g.  Printing on metal sheets is the newest thing, but that really is expensive.

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louoates
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« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2012, 09:57:05 AM »
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Last weekend I walked a street art show in Chicago's Hyde Park and noticed some photography trends I've seen recently in many art shows in Arizona:
1. A much larger percent of photographers (vs. painters) 
2. More canvas prints
3. Larger canvas prints
4. Much cheaper paper prints with and without mats. $20-49 16x20 usual
5. More HDR on display, usually mixed with traditional digital prints
6. Some specializing in HDR only with jumbo canvas prints. A few WAY overdone HDR, much like cartoon art
7. The usual percentage boasting "traditional" non-digital processing as a selling point
8. More #7 photographers considering switching to digital because of cost factors
9. The usual array of quality from exceptionally good in both digital and film to beginning digital photographers with zero post processing ability.
10. Very few were happy with sales. #6 above seemed to be creating the most "buzz".  Some in #7 above very defensive about film vs. digital.
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