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Author Topic: Want to focus more on panoramics - what would you do?  (Read 8718 times)
KMerv
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« Reply #20 on: February 15, 2012, 10:28:58 AM »
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Hi,

It just depends on what subjects you shoot and how large the output needs to be.

When a single row is adequate for your needs, and there is some close-up foreground detail or there are occlusions, then you only need a fixture for the Yaw (vertical) rotation axis to run through the no-parallax-point (NPP). All that's required is a bar that can be slid fore or aft to achieve that alignment between entrance pupil of the lens, and the axis of rotation. Such a setup is flexible in that it can be used with many different lenses and even cameras, and it can be expanded for multi-row stitching should the need arise.



Most of my prints these days are between 75 cm and 100 cm wide (39"). An increase in quality is of course always welcome which is why I've been eyeing the 5DmkII.

I can't test this so I have to ask: If I use shift to shoot a row of 3 images (max shift left, center and max shift right) do I get parallax problems?

Am I correct to assume that if I use NPP rotation and tilt to correct the perspective I'd not get parallax problems? How about any other problems?

Then thir scenario: Will there be parallax or other problems if I use a normal non-TS lens, NPP rotation and point the lens (around the NPP) slightly down to get more foreground and then shoot a row?

I'm sorry if I'm unclear about what I mean. English is not my primary language so I have to try to find my way around my limited vocabulary.  Undecided

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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #21 on: February 15, 2012, 02:39:47 PM »
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Hi,

See comments below...

I can't test this so I have to ask: If I use shift to shoot a row of 3 images (max shift left, center and max shift right) do I get parallax problems?

Yes, you will have parallax problems if lens is shifted. If yo have a tripod mount on the lens and shift the camera you may not get parallax.

Am I correct to assume that if I use NPP rotation and tilt to correct the perspective I'd not get parallax problems? How about any other problems?
Yes, no problems.

Then thir scenario: Will there be parallax or other problems if I use a normal non-TS lens, NPP rotation and point the lens (around the NPP) slightly down to get more foreground and then shoot a row?

You will not get parallax error but will have issues with hard to predict cropping and curved center line. A competent pano program may yield straight lines, however.

I'm sorry if I'm unclear about what I mean. English is not my primary language so I have to try to find my way around my limited vocabulary.  Undecided

That's OK. A problem many of us share!


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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #22 on: February 15, 2012, 03:16:07 PM »
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I can't test this so I have to ask: If I use shift to shoot a row of 3 images (max shift left, center and max shift right) do I get parallax problems?

Yes, when there is foreground detail then parallax will happen, unless you counter shift the camera by the same amount as you shifted the lens. The goal is to keep the entrance pupil (NPP) of the lens stationary. 

Quote
Am I correct to assume that if I use NPP rotation and tilt to correct the perspective I'd not get parallax problems? How about any other problems?

Assuming that also the tilt keeps the NPP stationary, then the stitch will remain without parallax. BTW tilt in a Tilt Shift lens is for scheimpflug focal plane adjustment, shift is for perspective. Perhaps you mean tilting the camera + attached lens. Then you probably will move the NPP, and get parallax.

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Then thir scenario: Will there be parallax or other problems if I use a normal non-TS lens, NPP rotation and point the lens (around the NPP) slightly down to get more foreground and then shoot a row?

As long as the rotation is around the axes going through the NPP, there will be no problem. You may need a stitching application where you can set the horizon manually, depending on how the stitcher works.

Cheers,
Bart
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rambler44
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« Reply #23 on: February 20, 2012, 09:35:35 AM »
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Before you print panoramas take a look at Dan Berg's website:

http://bergscanvasgallery.com/
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #24 on: February 21, 2012, 03:50:49 AM »
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Most of my prints these days are between 75 cm and 100 cm wide (39"). An increase in quality is of course always welcome which is why I've been eyeing the 5DmkII.
Then, the easiest would be to get a pano head and dive into multi-row panoramas, with a good stitching program (PS/Photomerge is convenient but has sometimes erratic results ; PTLens, or even Higin, are good ones).
Not more a hassle than fiddling with TS lenses, I'd say, and the IQ gain can be much higher, or at least easier to predict.

As said, so long you stay with a single row, hand holding works well.
My panos are all done this way (I didn't go into multi-row as I only got a 13" wide printer).
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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KMerv
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« Reply #25 on: February 21, 2012, 10:12:02 AM »
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Thanks for answers and comments guys. Looks like the TS-lenses are not really any sort of holy grail here.

Those are really nice pano's NikoJorj. Thanks for sharing. Smiley
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NancyP
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« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2012, 05:27:02 PM »
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Newbie here (message #2)
I want to learn more about panos, and got pointed to http://wiki.panotools.org/   There is a lot of good information. A freebie program that works on Macs (and Win, and Linux/Unix flavors) is Hugin (freebie ICE is written by Microsoft and thus only for Win users).
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #27 on: March 03, 2012, 01:39:13 PM »
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Newbie here (message #2)
I want to learn more about panos, and got pointed to http://wiki.panotools.org/   There is a lot of good information. A freebie program that works on Macs (and Win, and Linux/Unix flavors) is Hugin (freebie ICE is written by Microsoft and thus only for Win users).

Have you also looked at http://reallyrightstuff.com/WebsiteInfo.aspx?fc=108 ?It is a good basic set of tutorials that apply even if you do not use RRS gear.
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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
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