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Author Topic: Nik Software vs Onone Software  (Read 10503 times)
ozphoto
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« on: February 13, 2012, 12:24:49 PM »
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I am debating which app I should go with?

Onone lets you move from module to module without dropping back into Lightroom each time which is very good.

Nik does not allow you at this point to do the same, however they do have HDR which Onone does not. Nik does have the control point technology which I think is slick.

I like the workflow in onone and all the modules together as I can get HDR seperately from Nik or Photomatix

Any thoughts from you folks?
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digitaldog
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« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2012, 12:29:43 PM »
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These are not raw converters. What do you mean by module? If Lightroom (which I’m confused about due to where this is posted), keep in mind that if you already own Photoshop, there is really no advantage to either of these in LR since all they do is render out an image and apply their processing, just as if you had them in Photoshop.
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Andrew Rodney
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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2012, 07:34:18 PM »
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It really comes down to how effective is the software. The Onone resizer is an updated Perfect Fractals which was supposed to be pretty good. If their masking app is really good at selecting fine detail then it trumps round control points. The issue is always separating the spin from the reality. Don't they have a 30 day trial software? Try it! Post your experience.
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Steve Weldon
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2012, 11:26:00 PM »
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These are not raw converters. What do you mean by module? If Lightroom (which I’m confused about due to where this is posted), keep in mind that if you already own Photoshop, there is really no advantage to either of these in LR since all they do is render out an image and apply their processing, just as if you had them in Photoshop.
+1

Both of these open into a separate UI which prohibits the user from using the host program (LR or PS), until you exit.  If you don't have PS then the LR version is fine, but if you have PS I like to open the raw file into PS from LR, do any levels or whatever in PS, and lastly into the NIK or OnOne UI.  With the exception of Silver Efex the resulting file is.. well.. not something I'd want to keep processing in PS post NIK/OnOne.

I've reviewed OnOne in the past and am currently reviewing NIK (though I've used my own copy for a long time) for my site.. I've uninstalled OnOne and continue to use NIK products which fit my workflow and style better.  That should tell you everything.

Off-topic a bit:  I'm also currently reviewing Anthropics Portrait Professional and find it a capable piece of software.  But I'm having trouble finding application.  Either I'm shooting models who are hand picked for their symmetry and features whom I wouldn't want to "improve", or clients who for the most part don't appreciate being "improved upon." 
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plui
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« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2012, 01:32:41 PM »
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I use both. I spend more time using onOne for production runs... eg completing canvas wraps for customers using resize, and more of their portrait module lately,which is really handy for good, quick touchups.  Conversely, I spend more time with Nik for creative work -- though OnOne also has creative tools in its effects module. Nik Color Effects came bundled with the Wacom Cintiq.
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robgo2
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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2012, 08:28:07 AM »
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I have been a long time user of the Nik plug-ins, and a more recent user of the OnOne plug-ins, which I bought as a Suite, when they were offered at a sizable discount over buying the individual plug-ins.  I find that Nik is more useful for general photo editing, i.e, getting my photos to look great, and I have an established workflow for accomplishing that task.  OTOH, OnOne is more useful for specialized functions, such as resizing, retouching portraits and selective blurring.  It has some cool Photo Effects as well, but most are of little interest to me.  So, for me, it is not an either/or question, but rather one of choosing the right tool for a given task.  I suggest downloading trial versions of both as the best way to learn what works for you.

Rob
« Last Edit: February 21, 2012, 08:36:29 AM by robgo2 » Logged
pcg
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« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2012, 08:44:41 PM »
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+1  I have both suites and strongly favor NIK. Quite superior. But there are times when I'll switch back & forth. Different tools.
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