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Author Topic: Yorkshire Dales  (Read 2239 times)
shaunw
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« on: February 14, 2012, 03:37:02 PM »
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The Yorkshire Dales...the last of the fog its burnt away.


Yorkshire Dales by Shaunwalby Photography, on Flickr
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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2012, 12:19:57 PM »
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Hey Shaun,
I like the airy feel of this: the clear sky, big view and snow cover work together to convey a restful sense of space. The angles in the stone also pick up the fencelines, keeping my eye happily wandering around.
Grouse or raven tracks beside the stone?
Scott
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shaunw
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« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2012, 02:55:06 PM »
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Thanks Scott....re the tracks, grouse running around everywhere in the warm afternoon sun.
Cheers shaun
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stamper
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« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2012, 03:29:04 AM »
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"Now what can I find to criticise in this image?" I am sure that is the thought of a lot of members when they first view an image?
I can't find anything however. I like the toning very much. Contrasty without blocked shadows. A very nice image.
BTW have you thought about cloning some wind turbines onto the hills? Smiley
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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2012, 07:36:48 AM »
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"Now what can I find to criticise in this image?" I am sure that is the thought of a lot of members when they first view an image?
I can't find anything however. I like the toning very much. Contrasty without blocked shadows. A very nice image.

Criticism can be positive as well as negative. Stating what we like is just as helpful as saying what we don't like.
Scott
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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There is no rule! No - wait ...


« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2012, 08:09:46 AM »
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I'd like to see this as a large print 100x100 cm.
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Isaac
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« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2012, 11:22:53 AM »
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Criticism can be positive as well as negative. Stating what we like is just as helpful as saying what we don't like.
Stating that we like isn't criticism at all - it's simply praise.

"Now what can I find to criticise in this image?" I am sure that is the thought of a lot of members when they first view an image?
My impression is that you're talking about the first meaning of criticise - find fault with - rather than - analyse and evaluate.
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Isaac
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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2012, 11:42:16 AM »
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I wish the blank distant moor wasn't in the picture. I wish there was something with more detail and contrast along the right-hand horizon. I wish we could just swap the left-hand horizon with the right-hand horizon so that all those leading lines led to something less blank. Oh well.

I didn't notice the fog patches, I went back and looked for the fog because you'd mentioned it.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2012, 12:42:10 PM by Isaac » Logged
jalcocer
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« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2012, 03:29:21 PM »
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I liked it a lot, great shot
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shaunw
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« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2012, 12:34:22 PM »
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"Now what can I find to criticise in this image?" I am sure that is the thought of a lot of members when they first view an image?
I can't find anything however. I like the toning very much. Contrasty without blocked shadows. A very nice image.
BTW have you thought about cloning some wind turbines onto the hills? Smiley


 Stamper Thanks you for highlighting and pointing out those aspects of the image you enjoy and consider work well. Unfortunately your right about the doom brigade.....have you noticed how those the criticise consistently tend to post their own work infrequently.......strange that dont you think...lol

Shaun
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shaunw
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« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2012, 01:11:14 PM »
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Criticism can be positive as well as negative. Stating what we like is just as helpful as saying what we don't like.
Scott


Sorry Scott but your wrong here mate although as you'lll see i know what you mean.... and iam with you.

criticism is essentially the highlighting and pointing out of the negative aspects and here's the rub......of a ''critical analysis and evaluation'' of a piece of work.........the doom brigade (whom we know so well) are half cocked, they think critique actually means criticism....no it most certainly does not.

What it means is in your ''personal'' critical review of an image.  You review ALL aspects of the image...the good, the bad and the ugly you ....praise/celebrate (what ever word you want) those aspects of the image you enjoy and consider beautiful correct, appropriate, (whatever words you like but you get the idea) and you also highlight and draw to the posters attentions those aspects of the image you feel didnt work, are technically flawed (whatever words you like but you get the idea).

Critique should celebrate the quality aspects of your work and highlight those aspects which are flawed.......this is called ''balanced critique'' and as far as ''iam'' concerned offers the best chance for the poster to improve...it is a well know fact the humans learn from both success and failure.

On the net we have one hugh problem......just who the are the people doing the talking?Huh??

Personally regarding the doom brigade ...if your not on here posting your ''own images regularly'' (Your images wont lie about who you are there is a life tag running through all our images)...i dont even read their comments as i have not a single clue as to its merit.....after all it could be some sad old interlingual who's more interested in the correctness of the English language and arguing than actually taking photographs.

Personally iam still very much in love with photography and i see its joy in most work posted on here and iam likely to comment on those aspects as well as the aspects i consider are flawed.


Shaun
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shaunw
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« Reply #11 on: February 17, 2012, 01:13:39 PM »
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I'd like to see this as a large print 100x100 cm.

Cheers Chris

Iam planning on a large FAP matte print....yer those dimensions sound about right mate.

shaun
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shaunw
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« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2012, 01:17:30 PM »
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I liked it a lot, great shot

thanks Jalcocer....yer it works for me to, glad you enjoy it, look much better in full size high res of course.
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''Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop''. – Ansel Adams
http://www.shaunwalbyphotography.com
Isaac
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« Reply #13 on: February 17, 2012, 08:40:03 PM »
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Critique should celebrate the quality aspects of your work and highlight those aspects which are flawed.......this is called ''balanced critique''
What would balance unbalanced praise?


Unfortunately your right about the doom brigade.....have you noticed how those the criticise consistently tend to post their own work infrequently.......strange that dont you think...lol
You're probably right to hide who you're talking about behind the name-calling "the doom brigade" - if you said their names they might reply to what you write about them! LOL!
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ivan muller
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« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2012, 11:03:20 AM »
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On my small screen the image looks good, but I keep on wondering what it would have looked like before the mist cleared....... I live in a country where we don't get snow, so I do appreciate that perhaps a perfect sunny day like this is a rare thing.....?
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rambler44
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« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2012, 02:30:00 PM »
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I assume what people are looking for is constructive criticism.  If someone says, "I don't like it", I want to know why.  If someone says, "I really like it", I want to know why.

Okay, so why did Shauwn choose this image to post?  Was his goal to share a beautiful view?
Was his goal to gauge our assessment of whether he had included successful elements of a landscape taken with a wide angle lens? Did he want input on whether this is a successful choice for a black and white rendition?  Did he want to know our emotional reactions? Did he have a vertical of the same view or a different angle that he did not choose to share?

For me, it would be very helpful if the poster of an image would explain how our responses could be most helpful to him/her.  It would be helpful to know the metadata , ISO, aperture, shutter speed, any exposure compensation, focal length, what type of film, if not digital. Shauwn did nicely getting the foreground rock in focus and the distant subjects, too.  What did his lens focus on when he took the shot?

The poster might tell us, what exactly was the subject?  Why was the photograph taken? Why the title was chosen?  What emotion was he /she wanting us to share?  Was it an example of a specific technique? eg. panning to create blur. What elements of composition was he looking at, texture, tone, lines, exposure, contrasts, patterns, color, etc. 

On another website a poster said he was trying out a new lens and wondered if viewers thought his image was sharp enough?  Appropriately, no one criticized or even commented on the composition.  He was not looking for input about that.

So, what about Shauwn's image here?  I believe Shauwn had a lot of positive emotion invested here.  Notice the title.  Was he hiking along on a foggy, misty day, when suddenly it all disappeared and there was this wonderful long distant view in front of him, just what he had been hoping for.  Suddenly a break in the weather, clear blue sky with a few clouds... Wow, a great photo opportunity.   Notice a bit later he starts to get a little defensive about criticism.  Can't we tell what a beautiful view we have before us?  This is wow scenery we are looking at.  Someone else even noticed bird tracks and not just any bird tracks, but grouse!  They must have been there, too, or at least they know the territory and its unique beauty.  But, do we?

How do we know that there was mist or fog or any sort of object obstructing the view?  How do we know those are grouse prints or even any animal print at all?  I thought maybe some snow had melted off that rock and caused a hole or two as it fell. 

I am pointing out that we cannot have the same emotion as the photographer.  I am probably 3000 miles away from Yorkshire.  I am inside bemoaning the fact I injured my leg skiing this morning, and I am stuck inside, maybe out for the season.

So, I look at a photograph.  What do I see?  Composition.

I have recently learned that an effective method for adding depth and perspective to long distant landscape views taken with a wide angle lens is to include large, in focus subjects in the immediate foreground.  (Look at Asnel Adams' foregrounds).  Look at Shauwn's foreground...a large in focus rock.  It belongs. It is related to the landscape.  In the negative space between foreground and background, he has included natural lines. They lead us both left and right and down into a small valley that in turn leads our eyes to back to the distant mountains.  But wait, there is a large white cloud that catches our eye for a moment.  It draws us to the sky which is pleasing to look at here. It has a bit of contrast.  It is not washed out.  There is other contrast, too, which is important for black and white images.  Again, look at the blacks that show up with Ansel Adams, now black is contrast in the extreme to balance out his whites of snow.  Would Shauwn agree with Isaac's comments about lines?

My laptop screen is small, I cannot see all of the photo without scrolling downwards.  What I did notice was when there was just a small amount of sky above the large cloud and just a top section of the rock showing, the composition was still successful.  Maybe not all of that large rock is needed.  Of course, the all-important bird tracks would be gone.

Now, does it really make any difference to know whether I like or dislike Shauwn's image?

I often do not see things that others comment on in a photo, and sometimes I find there comments and reactions the opposite of mine.  To me that is how we learn. 

As my Mom used to say, "if there are three people in the room who all agree, someone isn't
thinking."







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stpf8
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« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2012, 08:31:09 PM »
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It's an interesting landscape to me primarily because it's one with which I'm not very familiar.  When I scroll the image up on my screen and put the top just above the cloud on the left (now the aspect ratio is about 1:1), I like the result because the focus or emphasis is even more strongly on the landscape, as if I'm looking at that portion of the photograph more intently.  The most the blank sky can do is to provide perspective or context, and that's not needed for this photograph.  If it's not needed, I'd suggest eliminating it.
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Stephen Penland
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shaunw
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« Reply #17 on: February 21, 2012, 02:26:41 PM »
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On my small screen the image looks good, but I keep on wondering what it would have looked like before the mist cleared....... I live in a country where we don't get snow, so I do appreciate that perhaps a perfect sunny day like this is a rare thing.....?

Thanks Ivan

yer i think if got there about an hour earlier the fog would have had more impact, having said that with fog you can get great atmosphere or an image which starts to look like the fog is covering the landscape from view...i guess its a fine balance. I perfect sunny day with snow on the ground in England is fairly rare.
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shaunw
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« Reply #18 on: February 21, 2012, 02:28:54 PM »
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I liked it a lot, great shot

Cheers yer i like this one
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shaunw
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« Reply #19 on: February 21, 2012, 02:39:37 PM »
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Rambler 44

3000 miles away eh, listen mate i hope your ski injury isnt so bad cruciate, ligament by any chance?

Youve got a lot correct about how i came across the scene (no plans for this one it was a walk about day)

i hope you like the image
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Canon 5D mk II Sigma 10-20, Canon 17-40mm L, Canon 24-105mm L, Canon 70-200 L, Lee Filters, Manfrotto geared head/tripod.

''Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop''. – Ansel Adams
http://www.shaunwalbyphotography.com
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