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Author Topic: "Float" Framing  (Read 2049 times)
douvidl
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« on: February 16, 2012, 11:40:45 AM »
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Does anyone have any recommendations for instructions on how to "float" frame an image?  I would appreciate the information.  The google search was not helpful on "how to" .  Thanks in advance.
David
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Johnny_Boy
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« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2012, 01:03:31 PM »
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What are you printing on? Canvas stretched? Paper mounted on 1" gator?
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Michael H. Cothran
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« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2012, 01:53:18 PM »
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Selling at art & craft shows, I "float" all of my wall hangings. The simplest way I've found is to mount the print onto a warp-free board, then use a spacer behind the board. I've used Gatorfoam & Styrene, from Coda. Here's a link -

http://www.codamount.com/

Look under Mountboards.
The print needs to be laminated, since no glass is used. For the spacer in back, I use a (cheap) 3/4" square wood frame from my local framer. I buy the frames a few inches smaller than the mounting board, and use a strong adhesive to glue it to the back of the mounting board (note - back of frame to back of mounting board). The rabbet cut on the front of the frame acts as a perfect hanger. On a 24x36 board, I use a 16x24 frame in back.

On the wall, the spacer frame "floats" the board 3/4" away from the wall.

You can go an additional step by placing your mounting board and spacer within a larger outside frame. This gives the impression that the print is floating inside the frame.

It has also become popular to have museum grade acrylic adhered to the front of the image rather than a standard laminate.

Bottom line whatever creative way you choose - apply a protective coating to the front, use a warp-free board, and a spacer behind.
 
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milt
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« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2012, 09:20:57 AM »
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"You can go an additional step by placing your mounting board and spacer within a larger outside frame. This gives the impression that the print is floating inside the frame."

For this alternative of floating an image inside of a conventional frame, there was an interesting recent thread:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=60870.0

For floating the image with a really upscale/professional look, the aluminum composite dibond is sometimes used.

For floating the image on a good looking piece of wood, you should look at the Plywerks products.

--Milt--
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Los Gatos, California | http://miltonbarber.com
Randy Carone
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« Reply #4 on: February 17, 2012, 10:34:26 AM »
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Here is an example of a pano that is 'floated' a half an inch away from the back board with strips of Gatorfoam, which is also what the image is mounted on, and the image is about a half inch behind the glass. Very nice effect and well received by the local gallery. Sorry the pic doesn't show the 'float' very well but it's all I have.
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Randy Carone
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