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Author Topic: Two from New Mexico  (Read 986 times)
rgs
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« on: February 16, 2012, 07:42:56 PM »
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In the hope I am not posting to often, here are two from New Mexico.
The first is from the top of the Capulin volcano and the second from Bob Cat Pass

Comment welcome.

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eleanorbrown
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« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2012, 10:03:35 AM »
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I particularly like the first one . Lovely.  I love New Mexico and just came from there...White Sands and Bosque del Apache. Eleanor
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francois
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2012, 10:38:07 AM »
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Wow... your first image is wonderful - a martian landscape. The second image is also very sweet but I prefer the more exotic image.
Well done!
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Francois
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« Reply #3 on: February 17, 2012, 10:57:29 AM »
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+1 on the first one
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2012, 02:14:41 AM »
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and another.

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
rambler44
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« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2012, 02:38:50 PM »
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Nice exposure and color in both and you have not tried to include too much in your photos. I think maybe the bare small bush in the lower left are a distraction.  Our eyes are pulled to them because they are light in color, yet not interesting to look at.
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stpf8
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« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2012, 08:19:05 PM »
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I think your first photo will have great appeal simply because the landscape is so different -- it's almost Martian in quality.  It appears to be quite hazy with relatively flat lighting, and as a result the range of tones is not very great.  For me personally, that kind of light works best when there is a foreground element that is sharply defined and relatively unaffected by the haze.  I like the contrast between the foreground and background in those situations, and it gives me a hint as to what everything in the background is really like if only I were closer.  The key, though, is a good foreground element, and those are often difficult to find.  It's the same as photographing in fog, and that's just my personal preference (offered only as food for thought).

I can understand your attraction to the second photo -- those aspens (I assume) are beautiful.  If only they could be shown more clearly and free of surrounding distractions (primarily the dead branches on the left, and the fact that we can't see where the trees connect to the earth).
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Stephen Penland
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rgs
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« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2012, 09:19:21 PM »
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Thanks for all of the comments.

The first one was made with a 300mm lens on a 30D so it's a pretty long lens for landscapes. It was also a pretty hazy day. That's why both the perspective and the light are so flat. I often like the flattening effect of a longer lens on a landscape. If you saw my recently posted shot of Polychrome Pass in Denali Park, you'll notice a similar treatment but that one has the braided river bed to lead you into it. That shot was also made with a long lens although not as long as the one in New Mexico.

As for the aspens, I looked for several days for a shot that wasn't just some "glowing aspens". This one was at first light and I rather like that the glowing trees are sort of peeking out from the foliage.



« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 05:46:17 AM by rgs » Logged

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