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Author Topic: The Most Dangerous National Park?  (Read 17063 times)
dreed
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« Reply #40 on: March 29, 2012, 12:16:23 AM »
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+1

Also good to know when to turn around in Detroit or Chicago or San Francisco.

Isn't Detroit a ghost town by now? Wink
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Lonnie Utah
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« Reply #41 on: April 02, 2012, 02:40:57 PM »
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http://www.ksl.com/?nid=757&sid=19822913&title=bill-would-give-border-patrol-more-leeway-on-federal-lands&s_cid=queue-8
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Rand47
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« Reply #42 on: May 01, 2012, 12:58:03 PM »
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Apparently, Arizona's Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, as per this article.

Perhaps, but it is such a great place to explore and photograph . . .
I call this one, "Tears of the Oracle"


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Lightsmith
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« Reply #43 on: June 22, 2012, 05:29:22 PM »
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It's dangerous if you are an overly zealous park ranger playing Rambo and chasing after possible drug traffickers with a rifle. This park ranger recklessly endangered not only his life but that of all future visitors to the area. Too bad that the park service has hyped this up to such a large degree though it is very good for the desert which will have a chance to recover from human activity including cacti poaching.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #44 on: August 31, 2012, 07:26:56 PM »
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Move over, Arizona, here comes Yosemite:

Up to 10,000 Yosemite visitors at risk of mouse-borne virus
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Slobodan

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sierraman
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« Reply #45 on: August 31, 2012, 11:18:07 PM »
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Move over, Arizona, here comes Yosemite:

Up to 10,000 Yosemite visitors at risk of mouse-borne virus
I think I will be avoiding Curry Village until next year.  Sad
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francois
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« Reply #46 on: September 01, 2012, 05:27:13 AM »
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I think I will be avoiding Curry Village until next year.  Sad

You might want to try Organ Pipe Cactus NM first and then YosemiteÖ A good read is the third chapter of Tony Hillerman's The Great Taos Bank Robbery (that chapter [We All Fall Down] is about plague in New Mexico).
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Francois
HSakols
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« Reply #47 on: September 09, 2012, 08:52:44 AM »
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Quote
I think I will be avoiding Curry Village until next year.  Sad

Great! That means the Valley will be less crowded. 

The Huntavirus deaths have been tragic, however, once again most are scarred to death because the media thrives of this type of thing.  Why haven't there been more deaths if we have about 4 million visitors a year?  No employees have died and they are around mice all the time?  Here in the park we have known about Huntavirus for years.  I just make sure to spray bleach on any mouse droppings before cleaning.  People are now cancelling their reservations left and right because once again it is just too dangerous.  I know of some people who immediately came to Curry Village after the media and event and they were pleased that they had a "safe" and quiet experience.  Furthermore, happy isles has been essentially empty.  Staying in Yosemite is still safer than driving to work - just do your homework and don't watch CNN.  Oh and by the way I'm leaving in an hour to take some photos in Yosemite Valley.  I'm more worried about slipping on some rocks than contracting Hunta.

Hugh Sakols


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jeremypayne
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« Reply #48 on: September 09, 2012, 11:41:21 AM »
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I'm more worried about slipping on some rocks than contracting Hunta.[sic]

do you die 36% of the time you slip?


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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #49 on: September 09, 2012, 03:17:36 PM »
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Great! That means the Valley will be less crowded....

This is an incredibly, incredibly ignorant post.  Angry
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Slobodan

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HSakols
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« Reply #50 on: September 10, 2012, 08:29:33 AM »
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OK saying that the Valley will be less crowded in mean spirited and harsh.  My point is that the public now thinks they have a very good chance of getting the virus just by entering the park. The people who contracted symptoms stayed in winterized tent cabins that had dry wall inside.  That allows lost of space for mouse droppings.  And yes while I was hiking around the Sunny Side Bench I did slip but didn't drop my camera. 
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HSakols
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« Reply #51 on: September 11, 2012, 08:16:02 PM »
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Up to 10,000 Yosemite visitors at risk of mouse borne virus.  

Now that is ignorant.

Yesterday somebody called our hotline and was concerned that if they went to the Casino in Oakhurst that they might contract the VIRUS.  

I'm worried that ignorant people will close all of our national parks because they are too DANGEROUS.  too bad I have to post this on a site like the Luminous-Landscape.  

STAY IN THE STUDIO

The landscape is too dangerous
 
I understand on the internet we come from vastly different perspectives. My frustration comes from people who want to take landscape photographs, but are not willing to learn about the natural world that they live in and believe that the government is to blame. 
« Last Edit: September 11, 2012, 08:23:33 PM by HSakols » Logged
Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #52 on: September 11, 2012, 09:05:33 PM »
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Yosemite doubles scope of hantavirus warning to 22,000; third death confirmed

Facts (what you make of them is up to you, of course):

- "18% of mice trapped for testing at various locations around the park were positive for hantavirus."

- "In 2011, half of the 24 U.S. hantavirus cases ended in death. But since 1993, when the virus first was identified, the average death rate is 36%, according to the CDC."

The problem is, in my humble and quite possible totally ignorant view, there doesn't seem to be a reasonable protection from it. You are playing lottery by entering the park during the outbreak.

Yes, nature and national parks can be dangerous places, but a reasonable person should be relatively safe by observing a limited number of common-sense rules. For instance, if there is a guard rail and a sign that states "DO NOT CROSS OR YOU WILL DIE,"  a reasonable person will observe it. It is pretty simple and straightforward, an definitely not difficult to notice and observe.

Contrast that with the following instructions: "...open windows to air out the areas for at least two hours before entering. Take care not to stir up dust. Wear plastic gloves and spray areas contaminated with rodent droppings and urine with a 10% bleach solution..."

Now, I do not know about others, but I've traveled the world over (including dozen U.S. national parks), and it never occurred to me to pack a bottle of bleach with me. Let alone a manual titled: "How to Recognize Mouse Droppings And Urine." How do I open windows before entering!? Do not stir up dust!?
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Slobodan

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HSakols
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« Reply #53 on: September 11, 2012, 11:44:13 PM »
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Iím no expert but I have a basic knowledge of microbiology and the nature of science.



You reference http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/09/07/13719926-yosemite-doubles-scope-of-hantavirus-warning-to-22000-third-death-confirmed?lite which comes from NBC news. 

I would like to redirect you and the rest of our readers to http://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/hps/prevention.html which I think puts the issue in better perspective rather than pure hysteria.

Furthermore the CDC states: What are hantaviruses?
Hantaviruses are a group of viruses that may be carried by some rodents. Some hantaviruses can cause a rare but deadly disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. The disease is called HPS for short.

You state that - "In 2011, half of the 24 U.S. hantavirus cases ended in death. But since 1993, when the virus first was identified, the average death rate is 36%, according to the CDC."
Sounds like the Virus quite common and found everywhere?

The problem is, in my humble and quite possible totally ignorant view, there doesn't seem to be a reasonable protection from it. You are playing lottery by entering the park during the outbreak.

Iíll add from http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=160615768 that states Yet the risk of getting these scary-sounding diseases is small. With the right precautions, you can still enjoy spending time outdoors. And that helps fight much more common threats to your health ó obesity and too little exercise.

http://www.healthmap.org/news/rare-hantavirus-discovered-two-yosemite-vacationers-82312
This article further scares visitors by stating that the problem started in a campsite.  This is not the case at all.  In fact no one camping has contracted the virus.

Now, I do not know about others, but I've traveled the world over (including dozen U.S. national parks), and it never occurred to me to pack a bottle of bleach with me. Let alone a manual titled: "How to Recognize Mouse Droppings And Urine."

Donít worry those specific cabins are now closed.  You will not get it in you 54 foot motor home-unless you let lots of mice in and they have time to poop.  I didnít know it was dangerous to swim under the waterfall.  On TV people do it all the time so it must be safe.  Besides this is a Park just like Disneyland except there are no theme characters.   If anything goes wrong I can always sue the government and get my money back.




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