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Author Topic: repair canvas before coating?  (Read 1907 times)
mstevensphoto
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« on: March 01, 2012, 11:44:17 AM »
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Hi all,
   I've got a very large canvas from my ipf8300 that represents about $90 in ink and at least that much again in canvas - it looks like it caught a folded over edge or something and there's a scratch in the ink in a totally black area of the print. Given the cost of the materials I'm wondering if there is a way to salvage this before I spray it with varnish (or after for that matter). I've used oil paint pens to fix dinged corners, but it's always an approximation and it works only because it's on the corner so one doesn't really see it anyway.  the scratch does not go all the way through to the white of the canvas, it kind of looks like about a 4" blonde hair on it...I'd love any suggestions of materials/techniques for the fix.
Mark
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KenBabcock
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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2012, 11:48:32 AM »
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If you have any old ink cartridges you can use a very small paint brush and dab some ink on it then paint in the black area.  I've done this many times in the past on totally black areas.

You're lucky it happened on black and can easily touch it up!
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2012, 11:48:54 AM »
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Black is easy,Sharpie. I try and blend it in with a dab of the finger.
If you have a left over cart of mk or pk whichever ink you used.
Open it up and put a little of the matching ink on your scratch to blend in.
The Sharpie is just too easy.
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fetish
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« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2012, 11:49:50 AM »
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break out your 'empty' black ink cartridges and a 00 brush.  Grin

pure black areas are the easiest to repair.
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KenBabcock
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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2012, 11:51:41 AM »
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Black is easy,Sharpie. I try and blend it in with a dab of the finger.
If you have a left over cart of mk or pk whichever ink you used.
Open it up and put a little of the matching ink on your scratch to blend in.
The Sharpie is just too easy.
Sharpie can't be good for archival purposes.
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Randy Carone
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2012, 12:14:08 PM »
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Sharpie will fade in a matter of days. Not good.

(Sorry Dan) Smiley
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Randy Carone
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2012, 12:38:17 PM »
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These pigmented markers are supposed to be good at canvas touch-ups...

http://www.dickblick.com/products/faber-castell-pitt-big-brush-artist-pens/

ken
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2012, 12:40:38 PM »
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Done more then a few with a sharpie and never have seen any fading issues.
Most of these repairs are at corners where all it needs is a little bit of black color to cover a little nick.
Also a little dab of glamor II helps blend the the blacks.
I use the Faber markers as mentioned above,but they do not have a black.

Ken,
Archival,are you serious? We are talking dabbing a little black ink on a damaged corner of a family dog picture. Smiley
« Last Edit: March 01, 2012, 12:49:48 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

KenBabcock
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« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2012, 12:53:49 PM »
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Dan, we're not talking about dabbing a Sharpie on corners.  The OP clearly stated the scratch was on the surface of the print.  Big difference.

How do you know Sharpie's don't damage your prints over time?  How many of your prints have you seen that you printed years ago?  Once canvases leave your hand, chances are you are never going to see them again.

Plus, I have first hand experience with a sharpie on canvas.  Many years ago my son had a canvas autographed by Curtis Joseph (former NHL goalie).  He whipped out his Sharpie he was using to sign everything else and before I got the chance to pull out my marker with pigment ink the autograph was done.  Looked fine for a bit until it faded and faded out the ink immediately surrounding his signature.
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Randy Carone
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« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2012, 01:38:25 PM »
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Yo Dan, I'm really not trying to get on your case today  Grin, but I have a Faber-Castell PITT artist pen that has black ink, which I use to sign my prints. It is part number PP 4 005401 673996. The barrell says it is 'Indian ink - waterproof - maximum light-fastness'. Just sayin'...
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Randy Carone
LenR
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« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2012, 03:02:10 PM »
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These are pigment pens normally used to sign prints. 
The ink is really black, it's archival and they have a variety of nibs.
Might be worth a try
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Kirk Gittings
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« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2012, 03:08:14 PM »
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You don't need an old cartridge (though its not a bad idea I keep mine) you can just pull out your current cartridge use it and put it back in.
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Thanks,
Kirk

Kirk Gittings
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mstevensphoto
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« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2012, 05:10:50 PM »
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thanks for the suggestions. Sharpies are loaded with acid I wouldn't consider one. I've seen them create an ugly yellow/orange halo in a very short time. I'll see if I can get some black out of my cartridge, my main concern on the markers is sheen, everything I have seems to be too shiny compared to the rest of the image. wonder where my good paint brushes are.....

Mark
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2012, 05:40:23 PM »
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Randy,
My Faber 5 ink set did not have black.
Look for a call from me to order one for future surface repair. Smiley

Ken,
Sorry I read the scratch in the folded over edge to mean edge damage not the surface,my bad.
I was talking corner repair all along.
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KenBabcock
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« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2012, 06:10:25 PM »
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Gotcha, Dan.  I didn't think you would use a Sharpie on the surface of a print, but you had me worried there for a bit Wink
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Justan
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« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2012, 06:20:08 PM »
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These pigmented markers are supposed to be good at canvas touch-ups...

http://www.dickblick.com/products/faber-castell-pitt-big-brush-artist-pens/

ken


I have the 48 pen box set by this manufacturer and it has been AWESOME for touching up minor issues. It doesn't change once Glamour 2 is applied and appears stable. The box states that the inks are non-fading. I've lost count of the number of larger canvas prints I've saved with these.

I always use my 6x eye loupe when applying. These pens reward a very light touch.

…one of these days I have got to get the belt replaced on my Z3100 Roll Eyes
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KenBabcock
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« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2012, 08:03:23 PM »
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   Ken,
 It sounds like the canvas is huge and I guarantee that nobody but you who has been pixel peeping at it with a magnifying glass, would ever notice it Wink You already have most likely become overly concious of it and your eye keeps subliminally being drawn to the imperfection.

    I strive for perfection also in my framing business, and in all the years and all the imperfections I have noticed I have discovered that people DONT notice the things I do.!
 Use the ink touch up technique , coat the canvas as always , and force youself to believe you never saw it in the first place. it will  then magically vanish from view. Grin

David 

You mean Mark Wink

You're right though, I notice the imperfections that others would never, ever find.  Not sure about the OP, or anyone else, but because I am a perfectionist and I notice it, I will almost always just re-print now.  However, on a canvas the size the OP mentioned, I would use the advice I gave earlier and get a small brush and dab some ink on, then coat as usual.
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KenBabcock
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« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2012, 10:06:11 PM »
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Bah...  you can't be that old, David.  Grin
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Don Libby
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« Reply #18 on: March 02, 2012, 11:41:36 AM »
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I picked up the Faber-Castell Pitt pens (48) a week ago and used them for the first time this morning to cover/correct a small blemish on a corner.  The area was black and using the black pen I can hardly see or tell where I used it.  I think dark colors will hide/blend easier than say a sky so time will tell however so far I'm very pleased.

I dug into the colors a little more and found with a little research I can match the RGB values.  Going to make a chart soon then on a image that needs attention I'll bring the file up to check the RGB then hopefully choose the correct pen.  Yeah anal is my middle name... Cheesy

Don
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gphi
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« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2012, 04:57:45 PM »
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We use acrylic paints for retouching any color, mix the color on a palatte
spray first.
if you need a glossy retouch they make gloss enhancers for mixing w arylics.

dot dot dot , smaller dots are better
dont brush it on like an artist
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