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Author Topic: Kodak discontinues the last of its slide (sorry, "reversal") films  (Read 2128 times)
BJL
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« on: March 01, 2012, 11:44:25 AM »
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According to the BJP:
http://www.bjp-online.com/british-journal-of-photography/news/2156493/kodak-discontinues-colour-reversal-films
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Rob C
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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2012, 04:07:26 PM »
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Well, you can't beat the wheels of justice. Frankenstein has finally klilled his creator.

Close the lights and go home, would be a good idea.

Rob C
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Brian Hirschfeld
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2012, 06:18:34 PM »
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Sad day, guess we are stuck with negatives.
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www.brianhirschfeldphotography.com / www.flickr.com/brianhirschfeldphotography
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2012, 09:03:34 PM »
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Kodak sort of lost the game to Fuji with transparency film several years ago.  Scary part is it might take 9 months for inventory to dry up? Hope the rest of their product line is managed better than that ...
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theguywitha645d
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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2012, 09:18:01 PM »
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It is always a sad day when we lose a process. But this might keep Fuji in a stronger market position to support such a product.

It is hard to believe that kids growing up today will think a Kodak Brownie as some sort of comfort food. When I was in rochester NY in the 80s, Kodak was THE giant.
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Rob C
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« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2012, 02:52:26 AM »
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It is always a sad day when we lose a process. But this might keep Fuji in a stronger market position to support such a product.

It is hard to believe that kids growing up today will think a Kodak Brownie as some sort of comfort food. When I was in rochester NY in the 80s, Kodak was THE giant.



And Kodachrome 64 Pro still keeping my bills paid!

Rob C
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Chris_Brown
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« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2012, 10:28:04 AM »
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Kodak was so poorly managed in the 1980s and 1990s. They used the archaic territory method of product distribution to protect their sales reps and distribution chain. Cases of sheet film purchased in Detroit first had to be shipped to Chicago, then to Detroit -- drop shipments from Rochester were prohibited. In the mid 90's they required camera stores to purchase a minimum of 5 DCS460 cameras if the store wanted to sell any. Each camera sold on the street for $28,000 so most local stores could only watch as catalog studios who needed one body would buy from B&H or Calumet.

In Detroit during the 1980's there were color separation houses that would scan only Kodak films (no Fuji, no Agfa) in a show of solidarity, and with complete disregard for what the client or the market was doing. It was a weird time.

Photographing surfers around SoCal in the early 80's the film du jour was Kodachrome 64. When I and a few others began using Fuji 50D the photo editors at Surfer mag thought we were using a specialized filter because the colors were so different. The benefit of shooting Fuji 50D with E-6 processing and getting its wonderful colors meant we never looked back. Kodak's marketing would go on to say they had "realistic color", and eventually Fuji came out with Astia, which I thought was a wonderful film when people were the main subject matter.
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~ CB
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