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Author Topic: Made in USA  (Read 1397 times)
Robert Brummitt
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« on: March 03, 2012, 05:13:20 PM »
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I photographed a neighborhood shoe repair shop. This is the first image I have so far.
It's an HDR photo with sight contrast enhancement.
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langier
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« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2012, 09:10:03 PM »
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Nicely done!
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Larry Angier
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kikashi
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2012, 03:39:23 AM »
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It is an attractive shot. I'm puzzled as to why HDR was necessary, though. The dynamic range looks well within that of a single shot.

Jeremy
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stamper
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« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2012, 04:06:56 AM »
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I would agree in principle with the above statement but we don't know what the original looked like?
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« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2012, 05:54:14 AM »
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Using HDR for something like this produces an interesting effect. It looks less like a photograph and more like a photorealistic illustration. I can see how that might be a desirable style for something like a magazine ad. But I am curious how it looked without HDR.
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deejjjaaaa
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« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2012, 11:30:42 AM »
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I photographed a neighborhood shoe repair shop. This is the first image I have so far.
It's an HDR photo with sight contrast enhancement.


if it is a HDR from many exposures why shadows are blocked ?
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Robert Brummitt
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2012, 11:45:07 AM »
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I'm Very very novice with HDR. From what I've seen before from others, HDR gives an interesting graphic look to images. I wanted to explore that. How I'm doing it is probably wrong but I like it. I think it has it's pluses and will probably keep it on my pallet.
I really enjoy that many of you are looking at this image and responding to it. I enjoy the thoughts and comments you are giving me. Thank you.
I will try to do a straight image and do a comparisons in home. I have another HDR image that I like as well. It's a little more colorful.
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popnfresh
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« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2012, 12:22:56 PM »
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I'm Very very novice with HDR. From what I've seen before from others, HDR gives an interesting graphic look to images. I wanted to explore that. How I'm doing it is probably wrong but I like it. I think it has it's pluses and will probably keep it on my pallet.

It's not wrong if you're getting results you like.
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Dave (Isle of Skye)
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« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2012, 04:08:36 PM »
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It is an attractive shot. I'm puzzled as to why HDR was necessary, though. The dynamic range looks well within that of a single shot.

Jeremy

Yes I like it too and even though I normally run a mile from HDR images, this one I really like.  Smiley

Dave
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Rob C
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« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2012, 03:11:03 AM »
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I think the truth about this shot is that it's an attractive subject, and that reducing things to their simple basics is ever a route to strong imagery... in fact, two factors make it tick: the simple label that's striking (to non-Americans) because of the odd obsession that some of us see with the perma-display of flags in America; secondly, the very notion of such boots shouts the Americas.

I wouldn't have imagined anything special would have been needed to get a good exposure from this shot. Except maybe a tripod!

Exactly the kind of thing that I'd have picked up on in my work many moons ago when attempting to shoot location indicators to accompany model shots on my calendars or even for travel brochure stock - I've stuck an example below.

I like it when foks do that kind of work.  It seems to me to be more rewarding than shots of vast national monuments, parks, cities etc. which have all been shot to death; I believe that national identity does, indeed, exist in small doses. Harder to spot, and probably even more difficult for nationals of those 'foreign' countries to grasp, because after a while you stop seeing what's under your nose. Again, that's one of the huge advantages of location shooting abroad: it usually inspires by its difference.

Rob C
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Robert Brummitt
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« Reply #10 on: March 07, 2012, 08:34:52 AM »
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Thanks for your comments, Rob C. I usually point my camera downwards for the details and not upwards for the larger seen. Once I read that Ansel photographed the big scene and EW looked at the finer details. So, I guess I'm in that camp.
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