Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Mundane Photos  (Read 21332 times)
BobDavid
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1079


« on: March 29, 2012, 09:58:04 PM »
ReplyReply

Sometimes mundane photos are all that is required to support a story that borders on the mundane. Any comments? http://goo.gl/FsxM0
Logged
Pete_G
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 234


WWW
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2012, 11:24:44 AM »
ReplyReply

Personally I preferred the shot of the barrel by the pool.
Logged

___________________
http://www.petergoddard.org
WalterEG
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1157


« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2012, 07:56:23 PM »
ReplyReply

Sometimes mundane photos are all that is required to support a story that borders on the mundane.

Sorry if I am upsetting anybody by rejuvenating such an old thread.

I have always worked on the understanding that much of what we do with photography is celebrate the wonder so often found in the mundane.

Treating the photograph as poetry rather than prose many of the iconic images produced have done just that whether it be mundane THINGS (including people) or mundane PLACES and SITUATIONS.

Logged
nemo295
Guest
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2012, 04:50:57 PM »
ReplyReply


I have always worked on the understanding that much of what we do with photography is celebrate the wonder so often found in the mundane.


I agree, but I don't see the wonder in these particular photographs. They're simply not very interesting.
Logged
WalterEG
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1157


« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2012, 04:58:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Yes Doug,

My bad.  I should have qualified my statement by saying that I was expressing a view about an ethos and not about the images presented in the OP.

Cheers,

Logged
james-greenland
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 36


WWW
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2012, 03:37:25 PM »
ReplyReply

Are we talking about the same photo? the one of the chameleon?

I don't think that photo is mundane at all. I thought it was striking and caught my attention immediately. In fact, I actually read the whole article because of it - whilst it wasn't the most beautifully written post in the world it certainly had me looking at the photo in a different light by the end of it.

Of course, if you were talking about the ones of the flowers at the bottom then I'd agree: they are dull and not necessary. In fact, I think the post would benefit from their removal - they detract from the story by not allowing the reader any room for imagination.
Logged

Justinr
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1027


WWW
« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2012, 03:15:32 AM »
ReplyReply

Are we talking mundane or simply cheap? The unwillingness to spend money on photography goes hand in hand with the belief by many in the meeja world that the advent of digital has made redundant the need for any knowledge of photography because all the worlds learning on the subject has been boiled down and encapsulated in the latest Canon/Nikon/Olympus etc. We may know different but it is just too good an opportunity for those managing the media to miss out on. Sending a reporter with a digi is a lot cheaper than sending a reporter and a photographer and to be honest how many viewers or readers are really going to notice the difference?
Logged

iluvmycam
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 352


WWW
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2013, 08:59:40 AM »
ReplyReply

Pix are ok. Not that mundane.

Egelston is king of mundane.
Logged
Alan Klein
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 782



WWW
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2013, 10:40:32 PM »
ReplyReply

Bob:  That was a very touching story about your family's chameleon.  Certainly not mundane.  It paralleled the death of our dog Buddy recently.  He was very sick for awhile and finally passed on.  We had a great loss and felt it deeply.  I think we all get attached to our pets.  It's something good inside us.  Thanks for sharing your story.  Alan.
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad