Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 ... 3 4 [5]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Artist Statement  (Read 24458 times)
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #80 on: April 25, 2012, 10:29:35 AM »
ReplyReply

Out of a sense of shame, inverted vanity, high anxiety and various mental spectres too numerous to enumerate, I've re-jigged mine:

http://youtu.be/EXSmAcJqsGI


Rob C

Logged

Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1875


WWW
« Reply #81 on: April 25, 2012, 11:16:44 AM »
ReplyReply

As long as weíre on the topic of, ahem, borrowed artist statements.....

Logged

Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2808


« Reply #82 on: April 25, 2012, 11:36:24 AM »
ReplyReply

My post was humor after the couple of posts just preceding it.  That's what the little emoticon was supposed to convey.
Don't give up the day job :-)
Logged
Colorado David
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 595



« Reply #83 on: April 25, 2012, 11:55:07 AM »
ReplyReply

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eV9YIpaTKQc
Logged

Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2808


« Reply #84 on: April 25, 2012, 12:31:31 PM »
ReplyReply

That's somewhat cryptic.
Logged
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2808


« Reply #85 on: April 25, 2012, 01:40:23 PM »
ReplyReply

fwiw Are "Artists' Statements" Really Necessary?
« Last Edit: April 25, 2012, 06:51:21 PM by Isaac » Logged
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2808


« Reply #86 on: April 25, 2012, 01:49:54 PM »
ReplyReply

I read someplace that the idea for an Artist Statement started in the early 1950s. ... if true, the original idea behind the Artist Statement was probably tied to McCarthyism.

There was also the rise of Conceptual Art - perhaps the concepts were not apparent without an accompanying text.

My guess is that the larger factor was an expansion in fine arts programs at universities, artists statements seem a convenient tool for judging students - Why do you need an artist statement?
« Last Edit: April 25, 2012, 07:23:01 PM by Isaac » Logged
Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1875


WWW
« Reply #87 on: April 26, 2012, 09:48:15 AM »
ReplyReply

^ This is as good of speculation as anything. According to the link you provided, the AS amounts to something that someone demanded of you. Why not? If someone wants to sell something on Craigslist, or anywhere else, they need to write a for sale ad, and I donít see the AS as being a whole lot different, except that itís typically much more of an indirect or even oblique way of writing: ďBuy my stuff so I donít have to get a real job!Ē

Perhaps more pertinently, the development of the university system of education through the early 20th century was a big deal in the US. While I donít remember when schools of art and architecture became part of the U system, I do recall several of my art history profs saying that the university system of education essentially replaced the artistís guild system, which was the previous standard for an art education.

In doing a little bone head research over a few days courtesy of Mr. Google, Iíve found a near absence of references to any formal study of the history of the AS. I poked through Google scholar and a bunch of other references. As far as this kind of dork research goes, there is no direct account i came across that even hints at a direct answer to the question of origins. If I were still a student it would be fun to take a Michel Foucault like approach to the development of the AS.

Perhaps the history of the AS is not all that important to the question of using one, but to pursue this, the next logical step would be to contact an art history prof at one of the local Uís to see if she/he has any knowledge on the topic. I donít plan to do this but someone with an interest might fire off an email. During my studies of art history we talked about a lot of stuff, but i don't recall the topic of an AS coming up. That was back in the 80s. As the article you linked clearly shows, itís now part of the curricula.
Logged

kencameron
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 669



WWW
« Reply #88 on: April 26, 2012, 06:23:49 PM »
ReplyReply


In doing a little bone head research over a few days courtesy of Mr. Google, Iíve found a near absence of references to any formal study of the history of the AS. I poked through Google scholar and a bunch of other references. As far as this kind of dork research goes, there is no direct account i came across that even hints at a direct answer to the question of origins. If I were still a student it would be fun to take a Michel Foucault like approach to the development of the AS.


Surely research would need to start by looking at the history of visual artists writing about their own work, for which there is abundant material going back at least to the Renaissance. Subsidiary and separate questions would be when some of this writing took a form similar to what are now called artist statements, and when the term itself was first used.
Logged

Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1875


WWW
« Reply #89 on: April 27, 2012, 09:16:36 AM »
ReplyReply

^To each his or her own approach, but to me your suggestion is the long way around and would lead to a lot of time spent reading. Of course if someone wanted to spend a lot of time reading, it would be great. Sadly I have little time for that kind of thing, and due to that was searching for someone thatís already written a history of the artist statement, or someone who has done some works in the area that made their way to Google scholarís research. There may be some as I havenít done a formal study, or even a made sincere effort. Were I to do that, Iíd start by contacting the dept. of A&A at a local U and ask one or two of the profs about it. At least thatís what I typically did in the time I attended a U. After all, what point is served by spending countless hours with a goal that is little other than re-creating a wheel, so to speak.

However, I do agree that if one wanted to truly learn the broader sense of what an artist or many artists had to write about themselves, then a much greater depth of study is advisable.

But heck, one doesnít need to read much of anything to put together 2-4 paragraphs of sycophantic fluff, which is typical of many AS. You can just look at a couple of your favorite artists, modify what they wrote a little, and call it your own.
Logged

kencameron
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 669



WWW
« Reply #90 on: April 27, 2012, 05:06:05 PM »
ReplyReply

^To each his or her own approach, but to me your suggestion is the long way around and would lead to a lot of time spent reading.
Fair point, although I would have to say that it is the approach I would follow even if I had only a short time (and assuming there was no prof to ask - certainly by far the best method) because it would allow an initial narrowing down of the scope of my search. "Artist statement" is a subset of "artist writing" and might be easier to find in that context than in the context of the whole of knowledge (so to speak). Having said that much, I really have no choice but to give it a go, do I? I will do so and report back.
Logged

kencameron
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 669



WWW
« Reply #91 on: April 27, 2012, 07:20:37 PM »
ReplyReply

Having said that much, I really have no choice but to give it a go, do I? I will do so and report back.

The unremarkable results of an hour or so on line, viewed through the filter of my own prejudices:

There is nothing much from before around 1970, although I found a reference from 1952, which I will chase up the next time I visit my local library.

Earlier comments about marketing are confirmed. Galleries require artist statements and sites aimed at aspiring professionals provide advice on how to write them.

That advice is not always good. "Show it to a fellow artist" is common, but surely "show it to a journalist or an advertising copywriter" would be better.

Often it is the artist, or their career choice, that is being marketed, rather than the work. Many artist statements are fragments of autobiography.

The artist statement is often a locus of intense anxiety for the artist, an occasion for uneasiness. On the other hand, some artists seem to find them all too easy.

Earlier comments about the link to conceptual art are confirmed. In such cases, the actual work may add little to the statement, or even detract from it. This is particularly the case in conceptual art with a political subject.

Texts that look like artist statements from earlier centuries tend to be by famous artists who have something interesting to say about their artistic philosophies. There may have been garbage back then, but time has buried it.

Contrary to my own earlier view, there does seem to be some correlation between the quality of the statement and the quality of the work. Cliches in the one are sometimes associated with cliches in the other, and quality with quality. But this is not always the case.

The earlier comment about the value of a "foucaultian" perspective is on the money. The artist statement is a central part of the "discourse" of the contemporary art world.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2012, 02:18:55 AM by kencameron » Logged

Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1875


WWW
« Reply #92 on: May 01, 2012, 09:11:02 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for taking the time to do some research!

> Texts that look like artist statements from earlier centuries tend to be by famous artists who have something interesting to say about their artistic philosophies.

Itís not limited to their artistic philosophies. For any semi serious art student, check out Vasariís ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giorgio_Vasari )  amazing body of works called ďLives of the Artists.Ē Hereís a partial translation: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/vasari/vasari-lives.html there are other translations to be found. It is an inspiring look into some highly influential artist, who date to the Italian Renaissance. Heavily political in its obvious favoritism for all things Florentine.

Just for the fun of it, contrast any of the writings by Vasari, with comments by Andreas Gursky, as example, found in the following brief review of Gurskyís works:
http://www.americansuburbx.com/2009/06/theory-andreas-gursky-big-picture-2001.html It shows a lot of how far society has come in several hundred years. Or not.

Logged

kencameron
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 669



WWW
« Reply #93 on: May 01, 2012, 05:21:39 PM »
ReplyReply


Thanks for that link - fascinating, and the web site as well - I will be back there soon.
Logged

Pages: « 1 ... 3 4 [5]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad