Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: rugged body and weather sealed landscape lens  (Read 10555 times)
rcloud
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24


« on: April 10, 2012, 05:08:34 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi, I am looking to go on a several months long backpacking trip and I need suggestions for a camera and lens.  The best possible weather sealing is a must(but I can't afford e.g. the new D4, 1DX etc.). 

I am looking at the Nikon D7000 for this.  Is it a good choice?
Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be a good weather sealed lens for Nikon like for instance the canon 24-105.  I wouldn't really like to buy canon as they seem to gouge their customers as much as possible(re: the new 24-70)
On the other hand a 5D Mk II and a 24-105 would be pretty ideal if the Body has more weather resistance?

Should I look at used 1D bodies?  My price limit for a body would be about 2k.

Thanks
Logged

k bennett
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1417


WWW
« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2012, 07:39:41 PM »
ReplyReply

1. What sort of backpacking trip? There's a huge difference between thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail and doing the hostel thing through Europe. The former requires something as light as possible, while the latter allows a little more leeway in equipment.

2. Weather sealing is often overrated. Why is this a "must?" My 1D Mark IV will handle rain at a far higher rate than I am willing to shoot in (something like ten inches per hour - ouch!) My 5D2 will handle misty or light rain as long as I treat it with some reasonable care - like draping it with a small towel, or putting it back in the bag when the rain picks up. Plenty of people are using 5D2 bodies in some pretty hairy places without issues. Unless you're actually shooting in terrible conditions, the storage conditions are more important than the body sealing.

A 1Ds Mark II will run about $2K, but that technology is getting a little old at this point. Also, it weighs a ton and the batteries weigh even more.

Where are you headed?
Logged

Equipment: a camera and some lenses.
Fips
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 195



WWW
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2012, 03:44:46 AM »
ReplyReply

You seem to change your mind quite frequently: ti3, Nex 7, A77, and now  D7000?  Huh
Logged
rcloud
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 24


« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2012, 09:13:23 AM »
ReplyReply

Appalachian Trail indeed is where I'm heading.  My third time hiking through it.  I have thought about the new olympus OM-D but I know nothing about Olympus lenses. 

As for changing my mind. Every camera I've owned has lead up to the next one in some way.  Either in sophistication or functionality.  But you are quite right, I should settle on one and really learn it. 
Logged

JGU1956
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 8


« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2012, 09:37:53 AM »
ReplyReply

Like many things photographic, compromise may be necessary.  Environmental sealing (both lens(es) and body) is obviously a good thing if you can afford it, but it is most often found on premium bodies and lenses, not the more affordable models.  Reviews of particular products often comment on weather and dust sealing, so do a bit of internet research.  Others will know more about the D7000 than I.

But there are also some quick, cheap and light solutions for rain, like carrying a clear plastic shower cap to put over the top of the camera and lens (but not covering the end of the lens unless you are going for the vaseline look  Wink), or a ziploc bag.  Both of these allow you to manipulate controls reasonably well while keeping most of the rain off.  Not so good for heavy rain of course.  I always carry a small towel or at least a dry shirt in reserve in case I have to do a real drying off of some gear.  A small nylon tent fly draped over your tripod is another solution (llike those dark cloths used in 19th century photography) until the moment you press the shutter.

Actually I think extreme cold can be more of a problem than rain, because if you bring a cold object inside a warm humid environment, condensation will do damage internally as well as externally.  If you are bringing a camera in from the cold, wrap it (or your whole camera bag) tightly in a plastic bag before bringing it inside, and only take it out of the plastic once it has warmed up.

The payoff for all this trouble is that often the best landscape photographs are taken in difficult conditions.  Persevere.

John.
Logged
JonathanRimmel
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 197


WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2012, 09:54:55 AM »
ReplyReply

From what I've heard Nikon's generally have a better more rugged build than Canon (though I may be misinformed). I would look at a D300 or D300s. These are certainly better built than the D7000. Unfortunately I don't know much about the ruggedness of lenses. You will want a pro level lens however. Something with internal focusing etc. The fewer parts of the lens exposed to the elements the better.
Logged
ripgriffith
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 158


« Reply #6 on: April 14, 2012, 02:47:46 AM »
ReplyReply

It would seem to me that you are describing the Sony a77 with the new Sony 16-50 f2.8 lens; both are weatherproofed and rugged, and well priced at just under $2000 for the kit.  Also, cutting edge technology.
Logged
Lloyd Mayeda
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 103


« Reply #7 on: April 14, 2012, 09:33:56 AM »
ReplyReply

I shoot with a Pentax K5 and some of Pentax's WR (weather resistant) lenses and would highly recommend them.

Here is a Pentax Forum where the cameras and lenses are described and rated:  http://www.pentaxforums.com/
Logged
Etrsi_645
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 33



« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2012, 09:43:35 AM »
ReplyReply

I just got a Pentax K-5 when it was on sale.  My lenses are weather sealed too.  When it was on sale, it was probably the least expensive avenue to getting a WR body and lenses.  Nice camera and ergonomically laid out menu-wise.

Logged

Pentax K-5 with lenses: DA* 16-50 f/2.8, DA* 50-135 f/2.8 circa 04/2012
LightRoom 5.3, Photoshop CC, Windows 7 Home Premium
i1 Display Pro
Deprecated:
Olympus E-500 with 2 kit lenses circa 10/2005
Pulse Color Elite software and hardware thereto circa 12/2005
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2673


« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2012, 01:31:30 PM »
ReplyReply

But there are also some quick, cheap and light solutions for rain, like carrying a clear plastic shower cap to put over the top of the camera and lens (but not covering the end of the lens unless you are going for the vaseline look  Wink), or a ziploc bag.  Both of these allow you to manipulate controls reasonably well while keeping most of the rain off.  Not so good for heavy rain of course.

Diapers! ;-)
Logged
Randall Dee
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


WWW
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2012, 04:26:23 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi,

New member here, so excuse me if I'm breaking some newb protocol, but I live in the Pacific NW and shoot in some pretty wet conditions. I hesitate to use the term ultralight, but I am a light weight backpacker, so I understand the weight limitations you'll be considering for your thru hike. I shoot a Nikon D90 which is by no means a weather sealed camera. I carry it in one of these. It's totally submersible and not a drop of water gets in. It gives me great piece of mind knowing that during stream crossings and the like that if I take a wet fall my camera stays dry. While not the ideal situation, I have logged a few hundred miles with the bag. I put it on first around my waist and then spin it around to the front and cinch it tight before putting on my backpack. It rides in the front where my camera stays and is easily accessible for shooting. I can still get my pack waist belt on as well. I also wear it while wading when fishing and I can attest that it truly is submersible.

I've fantasized about a thru hike before, but honestly, I always thought I would get a point and shoot for that kind of trip. Good luck!

Logged
lfeagan
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 208



« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2012, 10:30:19 PM »
ReplyReply

Something like a Nikon D7000 + an 18-200mm would yield a huge amount of versatility. But honestly, even the kit 18-105 lens would still give you a reasonably light kit and quite a bit of versatility. I have done a fair bit of backpacking in the rain (often times non-stop throughout the day) and so long as you don't do anything too foolish with your camera you should be alright without needing to buy a pro-level weather sealing.

I wouldn't go with a D300S at this stage. The D7000 is a better value, lighter, and will be sufficient weather proof. If you are hiking with someone else and want to shoot, have them hold a poncho over you. When not on a trail, I typically had my partner hold an umbrella over me. I used one of those super-light compact travel umbrellas. They are certainly a lot less expensive than a D4.

Best luck.
Logged

Lance

Nikon: D700, D800E, PC-E 24mm f/3.5D ED, PC-E 45mm f/2.8D ED, PC-E 85mm f/2.8D, 50mm f/1.4G, 14-24 f/2.8G ED, 24-70 f/2.8G ED, 70-200 f/2.8G ED VR II, 400mm f/2.8G ED VR
Fuji: X-Pro 1, 14mm f/2.8, 18mm f/2.0, 35mm f/1.4
Justinr
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 958


WWW
« Reply #12 on: April 30, 2012, 06:10:10 AM »
ReplyReply

I just got a Pentax K-5 when it was on sale.  My lenses are weather sealed too.  When it was on sale, it was probably the least expensive avenue to getting a WR body and lenses.  Nice camera and ergonomically laid out menu-wise.



Same here. The Pentax is also compact, has good warm (but not over saturated), colours and best of all has excellent low light capability. One or two issues like low light A/F not being particularly wonderful and of course the dreaded mirror flop. Other than that I heartily recommend the K5 and having used it alongside Canon's 5D I know it leaves the big C for dead when the sun has set.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2012, 06:12:26 AM by Justinr » Logged

Ray Cox
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 26



« Reply #13 on: April 30, 2012, 06:35:00 AM »
ReplyReply

Another vote here for the Pentax K5. Have been using this camera for quite some time and really like it. I have used it in pouring rain and then just wiped it off. Image quality is really good. In fact I liked it so much that I purchased it's big brother the 645D. While photographing a landscape recently, I had the 75A lens for the 645D roll down a hill and into a stream. As it was being swept away by the current I jumped in and rescued it. Later a quick rinse in the home sink, a dry out in a low heat oven, and still using it with no perceivable problems. Just wish my shoes had held up as well as the lens did! 
Logged
macabee
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #14 on: December 05, 2012, 07:49:40 AM »
ReplyReply

I also use the Pentax K5, I am please with the results, whilst it has not been used in inclement weather I feel confident that it will not let me down. When you consider that the relevant Canon and Nikon weather sealed bodies, cost far more you also have to by expensive lenses, whereas the Pentax 18-55 kit lens with the K5 is weather sealed.

You also have to consider that for example the Canon 1Ds weighs 42.9 oz. / 1215g (body only) the Nikon D3 weighs in at 1,240 g (2.7 lb) but the Pentax K5 weighs with battery: 750 grams (1.7 lb) without battery: 670 grams (1.5 lb) [all weights approx.] If like myself you are a hiker weight is important
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad