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Author Topic: An Embarrassment of Riches  (Read 8046 times)
BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #80 on: May 04, 2012, 04:50:52 AM »
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Don't know whether it is a game changer, nor why it is important that it could be a game changer, but as someone having just spent 30+ hours over 3 days shooting panoramic landscape with one in the dark forests of World heritage site Yakushima, I can clearly state that:

- the D800 is a very good landscape camera, close to ideal in fact. I'll be posting some images soon,
- I have had zero issues with live view, even in pretty dark situations.

Cheers,
Bernard
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A few images online here!
Mark D Segal
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« Reply #81 on: May 04, 2012, 05:47:02 AM »
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.......... As far as I can see, digital capture has only created an entirely new camera industry at the expense of a hell of a lot of other established companies, jobs and the value of money invested in equipment itself. However, I am more than willing to admit that digital home printing has opened the door to a lot of more user-friendly opportunities for print making. Having written that, I have not seen any great number of prints that's been any more worth the making digitally than via the old ways. Do it with a brush, a trowel, a stick or a spoon or even through a lens - unless the image has something intrinsically worthwhile to state, it matters not at all that (or how) it is created.

And that's the basic, bottom lˇne that digitsl has never been able to disguise.

Rob C

Well, with all due respect for your right to your own opinions Rob, frankly I don't think you're seeing far enough. But what one sees partly depends upon what one wants to look for, and that may be the determinative issue here. I was actually just thinking about this yesterday. A couple of days back I was browsing Amazon.ca for a book on another topic, and you know how they bring up, based on your browsing history, other books you may be interested in. Normally I don't react well to this kind of thing because there is an underlying sense of being watched and tracked - well not only a sense, the reality - ANYHOW, setting that aside, one title really caught my fancy - "The Dawn of the Color Photograph: Albert Kahn's Archives of the Plant" by David Okuefuna. This book is a sequel to a BBC program on the subject. Looked interesting and had a string of highly positive reviews so I bought the book and am I ever pleased I did. It's a treasure. It's about Kahn's initiative to create a world-wide collection of colour photographs of the state of human existence on the planet nack in the early 1900s using the then new autochrome process (variants of which survived into the 1950s), invented by the Lumiere brothers in France and the first practical approach for making colour photographs on a commercial scale. You can look-up the details of the process - seen from today's perspective it's disarmingly simple - very tiny dyed grains of potato starch serving as colour filters affixed to glass plates of photographic emulsion, exposed and processed by reversal to yield a positive transparency. Considering what it is and when, the results are truly remarkable and the images have tremendous "character"; but when you look at these beside what comes out of a modern inkjet printer and compare the processes involved from capture to end-product, you can't help but be impressed with the enormous contribution that technological progress has made to image quality and the ease of making them in terms of every technical metric you can throw at it.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
Rob C
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« Reply #82 on: May 04, 2012, 07:50:36 AM »
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Mark –

You may be right – it’s only my own view tempered by what I’ve experienced, but also, you must remember that my response was to a post about CaNik’s supposed great ‘innovations’ during the slr era, and that doesn’t go as far back as Autochrome! So whilst I may be looking insufficiently far ahead, you’ve looked a bit far in the opposite direction, too.

I also admitted that digital printing, as distinct from digital capture, is a great step ahead in convenience and, in some ways but not all, print manipulation and control is now easier for the newer printer (the person).

Rob C







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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #83 on: May 04, 2012, 07:57:53 AM »
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Yes Rob, I was taking the grand overview, not only in time, but through the whole technical chain, because to get to the digital prints of the quality we're seeing today, you also want the digital captures. One can do great things with film scans, but they're still not what a Nikon D800 or many other DSLRs can deliver as the starting point for the prints. The prints are the end-result of an evolution of a technological continuum through each link in the chain from capture to end-product, with all the advances in materials technology, design technology, software and firmware development etc. that are brought to bear.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
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