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Author Topic: PS Layer Mode Question  (Read 708 times)
Remo Nonaz
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« on: May 09, 2012, 12:49:11 PM »
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I have a black and white image I worked up in Lr4. I needed about six adjustment brushes to get the clouds and sun beams in a sky scene close to where I wanted them. I'm still not 100% satisfied with the results and would like to try processing the same image in Photoshop using adjustment layers and masks to brighten, darken and change contrast in different areas.

I have an idea of how to do this and am planning to make three layers; one brightened, one darkened and one with strongly increased contrast. Each layer will have a layer mask that I can use to paint in or out the changes I need. But ultimately, I will need to see down through the full stack to see all the adjustments.

What would the correct blending mode to accomplish this be?
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I really enjoy using old primes on my m4/3 camera. There's something about having to choose your aperture and actually focusing your camera that makes it so much more like... like... PHOTOGRAPHY!
john beardsworth
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« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2012, 12:52:33 PM »
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It depends.

Assuming these are curves adjustment layers, choose Luminosity - this prevents the curve shifting the colours.

John
« Last Edit: May 09, 2012, 01:30:34 PM by johnbeardy » Logged

john beardsworth
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« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2012, 01:21:27 PM »
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BTW I answered on the assumption that you are taking a colour image into PS, doing the curves adjustments, then making it B&W. IF it's a B&W already, the mode wouldn't generally matter.
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Redcrown
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« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2012, 01:54:41 PM »
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Your question is a bit confusing, trying to guess what you mean by "see down through the full stack."

Doing that is so basic, I have to assume I don't understand what you mean. But the basics are simple and don't involve blending modes at all.

Just toggle an adjustment layer on and off to see the effect of that layer by clicking on the "eyeball" in the Layers panel. Clicking on one eyeball and dragging through other eyeballs will toggle multiple layers on and off. Or, put multiple adjustment layers in a Group and then toggle the Group on and off.

And shift-click on the mask icon in the Layers panel to turn the masks on and off, seeing the effect of the mask.
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Remo Nonaz
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2012, 12:03:35 PM »
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That's pretty much how it worked out. I did neet to put the layers into luminosity mode.

Initially I started over again from the DNG file, but I didn't think the results were any better than what I'd gotten out of Lr with six adjustment bushes. I then imported the finished Lr image and just worked on enhancing certain areas I wanted to add contrast to. That worked pretty well though I'm not sure the final image is much of an improvement.

A reasonable learning excercise, though. Thank you all for your commments.
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I really enjoy using old primes on my m4/3 camera. There's something about having to choose your aperture and actually focusing your camera that makes it so much more like... like... PHOTOGRAPHY!
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