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Author Topic: i1Profiler Saturation slider  (Read 1228 times)
aaronchan
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« on: May 16, 2012, 03:49:28 PM »
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Dear all,

I've just made a profile with i1P with i1pro, but the result is a bit too saturated than the one I've made before. (I cannot use the old one due to the ink and paper seems like shifted from batch to batch). And now I want to modify the ICC rather than putting my hand into all of my files again. In i1P, i see there is a saturation slider, but my images are printed in Absolute Colormetric rendering intent, does the slider still going to effect even tho I'm not printing with perceptual?

Thanks
Aaron
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2012, 04:02:16 PM »
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No, the slider only effects results when using the Perceptual intent.
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aaronchan
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« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2012, 04:03:17 PM »
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No, the slider only effects results when using the Perceptual intent.

Thanks Scott,

So is there any 3rd Party software that I could decrease the saturation of my profile?

Thanks
Aaron
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aaronchan
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« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2012, 04:05:12 PM »
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Thanks Scott,

So is there any 3rd Party software that I could decrease the saturation of my profile?

Thanks
Aaron

Yes, I do have ProfileEditor from ProfileMaker suite
But seems like I have to do a night of test to get the right result for myself.....
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2012, 04:07:30 PM »
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So is there any 3rd Party software that I could decrease the saturation of my profile?

Profile editing is rarely the best solution for a problem. I think better questions might be "Why am I getting an abundance of saturation?" and "How else (besides profile editing) can I get the results I desire?"

Care to describe the problem you're having in more detail? Are you're sure it's the new profile that's incorrect - not the old one? Or is it that the simulation profile needs to be remade?
« Last Edit: May 16, 2012, 04:09:51 PM by Onsight » Logged

aaronchan
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« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2012, 04:23:44 PM »
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Profile editing is rarely the best solution for a problem. I think better questions might be "Why am I getting an abundance of saturation?" and "How else (besides profile editing) can I get the results I desire?"

Care to describe the problem you're having in more detail? Are you're sure it's the new profile that's incorrect - not the old one? Or is it that the simulation profile needs to be remade?

Dear Scott,

I'm currently working on a project for this photographer who shoots wet plate. We scanned his glass negs and reproduce the tonality in photoshop which is not a pure mono tone image. The color between highlights and the shadow are slightly shifted into either magenta or green. This is a very critical job. Because the differential of the color and the color appearance supposedly bare can see, so it is something you really have to pay a lot of attention to make them correct. After a year later, now I have to reprint them, I have the original print which I printed it as well sitting right next to me. The new profile wasn't that bad but the saturation just a bit higher than before. Since I don't want to touch the file, that's why I'm thinking of to tweak the new profile to match the old one to produce the same result that I used to get from the same printer, 8300. Of course I can re-print a target with more color and gray scale patches in it to see if my profile is bad or not, but with my own test image, I see nothing wrong from it.

Wet plate color is something, it is super headache job, those tiny bit of magenta light brown and tiny bit of green dark muddy color.

Aaron
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digitaldog
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« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2012, 04:42:42 PM »
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Tweaking the profile will be far more work and take far more media than just tweaking the file. Make a step wedge adjustment on one, find the sweat spot and make an adjustment layer. Or something along those lines.
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Andrew Rodney
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Scott Martin
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« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2012, 08:26:08 PM »
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I think it's important not to confuse the different roles of color management and color correction. I'd venture to guess that your new profile is doing an excellent job reproducing the "true colors" in your image file relative to the paper's white and DMax characteristics. [That's just one way of saying it that I hope is connecting with you - there are certainly different ways of saying that...]

For now I'd employ some good color correction techniques to get the pleasing color you desire. That's a better route to travel.
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