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Author Topic: Scanning prints with VueScan pro 9.0.75 (Mac)  (Read 1761 times)
Dajm
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« on: May 20, 2012, 02:08:13 AM »
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Hi all, new here and I'm hoping to get some answers before my head implodes.

I'm new to scanning (and also LR4 and PS CS6) and I'm trying to figure out settings that will be optimal and future proof (using LR and PS now but that can change). I have a very average/cheap scanner, a canon MP495 and I know this is not ideal but I'm not in a position to upgrade atm. Tons of old prints from my earlier travel that often are not great but it's what I got and I want to get the best result with the tools I've got.

My goal is to digitise for convenience, edit in LR and PS but also for back ups/archive. I will rarely make prints or enlargements but it could happen. I would prefer to keep the files below ~50mb (.tif) but I want some wriggle room for later edits without any degradation.

I have figured out many of the settings but some still confuses me (

INPUT
Bits per pixel: should I use 16, 24 or 48 bit RGB?
Scan resolution: I set it to 1200 (max). Appropriate?

CROP
Leave as default.

FILTER
Leave as default (nothing is ticked).

COLOR
White point (%): 0.1. I read somewhere that this would be a better than default (1.0). Opinions?
Scanner color space: Built in. I don't know how to make a profile and not sure if I need to...?
Printer color space: ProPhoto color space
Output color space: ProPhoto color space
       This is confusing to me. Not sure what the difference is between those two. I've read that ProPhoto is better than sRGB and Adobe RGB but not sure if it applies to me here...?

OUTPUT
TIFF size reduction: 2
TIFF file type: Again, 24 or 48?
TIFF compression: Auto
      What's the difference between reduction and compression. Do I reduce quality if I reduce with 2 and have auto compression. The files becomes much smaller but I suspect some info is lost despite it being "lossless"...? Some combinations here produces very large files so I need to compromise here. Please advise


I appreciate any suggestions and advice Smiley
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Mark D Segal
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« Reply #1 on: May 20, 2012, 09:09:02 AM »
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My advice is that you buy Sascha Steinhoff's book called the "Vuescan Bible" http://www.amazon.com/The-VueScan-Bible-Everything-Scanning/dp/1933952695/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337522856&sr=1-1. It's inexpensive and will answer all your questions - and more. If you plan to use that application it's a good resource to have on hand.
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Mark D Segal (formerly MarkDS)
Author: "Scanning Workflows with SilverFast 8....." http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/film/scanning_workflows_with_silverfast_8.shtml
BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #2 on: May 20, 2012, 10:52:29 AM »
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I have figured out many of the settings but some still confuses me (

INPUT
Bits per pixel: should I use 16, 24 or 48 bit RGB?
Scan resolution: I set it to 1200 (max). Appropriate?

Hi,

You should scan at 16-bits/channel, so 16-bit gray for Grayscale images, and 48-bits for 3 channel RGB images. Whether you want to also output in 16-b/ch after gamma adjustment depends on how much postprocessing you intend to do. If you want to do a lot then stay in 16-b/ch, otherwise you can create smaller output file sizes by then dropping to 8-b/ch (8-bit Gray or 24-bit RGB color).

Depending on your original images, there may be little resolution in your prints beyond 600 PPI. Only you can tell. You could scan at 1200PPI (I presume the scanner's native sensor resolution), and downsample when producing the output.

Quote
COLOR
White point (%): 0.1. I read somewhere that this would be a better than default (1.0). Opinions?

Just look at the white areas of your images, if you want to retain a little paper structure there, 0.1 is probably better. You can see in the status bar at the bottom what RGB values the white areas have, when they are a tiny bit below 255,255,255 then you have retained some tonality there instead of clipped white.

Quote
Scanner color space: Built in. I don't know how to make a profile and not sure if I need to...?

If you don't have a dedicated profile for your scanner, just leave it set to "built-in".

Quote
Printer color space: ProPhoto color space

No, this should reflect the profile your printer requires to make good output. So it is either a specific profile for a specific paper type on your specific printer, or just use sRGB. This choice is only used when you print directly from VueScan, e.g. when using your scanner as a copier.

Quote
Output color space: ProPhoto color space

This should be set to the working space of your photoeditor application. Programs like Photoshop can use a colormanaged workflow, with conversions between colorspaces. When the original contains hugely saturated colors, then "ProPhoto RGB" can be beneficial, but when your originals are prints, then "AdobeRGB" is probably more than enough. If you don't have a colormanaged photoediting workflow, the set the output color space to "sRGB".
 
Quote
OUTPUT
TIFF size reduction: 2

This downsamples the output image by combining/binning pixels. You could use that if you initially scanned at 1200 PPI but want to reduce the file size to 1/4th (half horizontal and half the vertical number of piixels).

Quote
TIFF file type: Again, 24 or 48?

If you want to do more postprocessing on the files, keep it in 48-bit mode (3x16-bit channels) till you're done, and if not then you can reduce the file size to half by using 24-bit (3x8-bit channels).

Quote
TIFF compression: Auto
      What's the difference between reduction and compression. Do I reduce quality if I reduce with 2 and have auto compression.

See above, reduction removes pixels by averaging blocks of pixels before reducing the file size to single averaged pixels. Compression is chosen to make the files smaller but without losing any pixels. Leave this to automatic, it will make the best choice for you.

Cheers,
Bart
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Dajm
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« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2012, 03:42:01 AM »
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Thanks you so much Bart! That was exactly the kind of reply I was hoping for. Much appreciated.

I have adjusted the settings according to your suggestions, using 16b/ch and also 2x size reduction and auto compression which spits out tif files at ~50 mb. Great stuff  Grin

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KolinP
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« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2012, 03:37:12 PM »
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Thank you Dajm for asking a 'bigger' question on this than I had considered asking, and thank you Bart for your full reply!  You've accelerated my early getting-to-know steps too with VueScan, especially on the White balance setting.

Thanks too Mark for your reminder about Sascha Steinhoff's VueScan Bible.  I'd heard that it wasn't 'strong' on its cover of ICC profiling issues (which is where I'm now concentrating), but I've taken the leap and ordered a copy at last through my local (real-life bricks 'n mortar) bookshop - to find out for myself  Smiley

Colin P.
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