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Author Topic: Marshmallow harvest  (Read 1723 times)
Justan
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« on: May 29, 2012, 09:14:36 AM »
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The rare time of the year when they are at their peak, and before they go to the processing house...



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Thanks for havin' a look!
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luxborealis
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« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2012, 05:07:32 PM »
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What I find intriguing is the mountain/volcano way in the background - what mountain is it?
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Terry McDonald
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2012, 10:59:29 PM »
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I'm gonna make an idiot of myself and guess.   Cool

Either Mt. Adams or Mt. Hood.
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leuallen
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« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2012, 11:14:06 PM »
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Around here (Illinois) our hay bales run naked. Why do yours have clothes on?

Larry
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2012, 11:41:00 PM »
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Maybe it gets cold up there....

Regards

Tony Jay
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Justan
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« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2012, 01:53:45 PM »
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As I understand the practice, tightly covering the bales is done to help remove oxygen and to promote fermentation. This aids in the digestion process for most livestock. The process is called silage, and can be done by wrapping the material as shown, by putting it in a packed silo, or covering with a huge tarp.

It might be fun to do a little PP and elevate the Ďmallows a foot or so off the ground and make them appear to be floating. But, of course, doing that would be best served by a re-shoot during the golden hour...
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leuallen
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« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2012, 03:59:43 PM »
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Thanks Justan,

I am not a farmer nor do I play one on TV, but I been on plenty of farms and I know what silage is. It is stinky stuff. Most of the barns with silos around here are old, over 100 yrs. The silos are generally in decay and not used anymore. I'll check around and find out the status of silage. I remember it as a kid, 60 years ago.

Larry
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Justan
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« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2012, 08:26:32 AM »
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> I am not a farmer nor do I play one on TV, but I been on plenty of farms and I know what silage is. It is stinky stuff.

Iím not a famer either. This didnít have much of a scent, but was freshly cut and deposited. The harvesters were making bales behind where I set up. After a few weeks, I bet the bales will have a fairly mature bouquet.

I remember reading that the fermentation process causes a lot of liquid to be shed from the silage and that this tends to be high in nitric acid and other nutrients. Accordingly the liquid is both highly corrosive and, of course, can mess with the water supply in a big way.

> Most of the barns with silos around here are old, over 100 yrs. The silos are generally in decay and not used anymore. I'll check around and find out the status of silage. I remember it as a kid, 60 years ago.

Not too many silos in the Enumclaw area but there are a number of aged buildings, with one example above. It sounds like your area has a lot of lovely photo-ops to capture vintage bldgs and their surroundings. Itís great subject matter.
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leuallen
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« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2012, 10:56:24 AM »
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Justan, there are quite a few old barns around here, central Illinois. I photograph as many of them as I can. They are rapidly disappearing due to high maintenance cost and high taxes.

Here is an old dairy barn not to far from my home. I photograph it regularly in with different light, lenses, or whatever technique I can think of to try. I shot this yesterday in infrared. It was heavily overcast and rainy.

I love the way that it sets alone on the gentle rolling slopes. There is a house and road to the right.

Larry
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Justan
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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2012, 07:47:55 AM »
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Thatís very nice composition and treatment!

One of the things I do from time to time is to take an image of the same location at different times of the year, to capture the seasons. Sometimes I assemble these into one 4 part image and other times into separate images. With the farm scapes, Iíve been doing an on-going round the year collection, but of different sites. The one below is a favorite winter-scape.



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leuallen
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2012, 01:19:15 PM »
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Great panorama. The red barn pops. I do the seasonal thing also. I have some panos of a local winery taken in all four seasons from approximately the same position. Trouble with me, is, that I can't stand the cold. So winter is out. Below 40F my hands get cold regardless of gloves. It becomes very painful and takes hours to recover. So I stay in regardless of photo ops.

The thing that has got my attention now is the patterns that the rows of the newly planted crops create. This condition is short lived as the crops mature the rows disappear. I shot quite a few yesterday as we had a nice sky. Here is one example. The sky is not really that ominous, it is the infrared effect. The infrared really brings out the contrast in the rows and different plants react differently regarding tone. This is all new to me and is a relief as I was getting bored with what I was doing.

Larry
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2012, 06:22:34 PM »
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Justan, the temperatue in my living room dropped 20o just viewing this image of the red barn with the mountains as the back-drop.
Would you post the "summer" or "spring" view for comparison - I need to warm things up a bit!

Regards

Tony Jay
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Justan
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« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2012, 08:47:17 AM »
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>Great panorama. The red barn pops. I do the seasonal thing also. I have some panos of a local winery taken in all four seasons from approximately the same position. Trouble with me, is, that I can't stand the cold. So winter is out. Below 40F my hands get cold regardless of gloves. It becomes very painful and takes hours to recover. So I stay in regardless of photo ops.

Thank you for the complement!

Iím a fan of cold weather. Always have been but donít do so well when itís hot. Heck, around here, if it gets over 60 degrees, the webbing between our toes and fingers starts to chafe and dry out. Have you tried heated gloves? There are some which are battery operated, the heat lasts for hours, and they do a phenomenal job.

> The thing that has got my attention now is the patterns that the rows of the newly planted crops create. This condition is short lived as the crops mature the rows disappear. I shot quite a few yesterday as we had a nice sky. Here is one example. The sky is not really that ominous, it is the infrared effect. The infrared really brings out the contrast in the rows and different plants react differently regarding tone. This is all new to me and is a relief as I was getting bored with what I was doing.

This image shows temporal like change and the clouds are just fabulous! It is surreal. I only did IR a few times long ago at school, but when doing b&w I often used a red filter, and it produced skies similar to what you show, but never did have the softness of the foliage.

Another member here does a lot of work with similar tonality, but afaik he doesnít use IR. His name is Ben Rubenstein. He posts more on OPF photography than here. You might like his works.
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Justan
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« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2012, 08:51:26 AM »
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Justan, the temperatue in my living room dropped 20o just viewing this image of the red barn with the mountains as the back-drop.
Would you post the "summer" or "spring" view for comparison - I need to warm things up a bit!

Regards

Tony Jay

I don't have that but here's one with a spring theme. Sadly, the barn collapsed a few months ago. Who would have seen that coming??



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