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Author Topic: 32-bit editing in Lr4.1  (Read 8324 times)
Remo Nonaz
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« Reply #20 on: June 28, 2012, 05:02:47 PM »
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Well that certainly looks better. As noted, I am using CS4, not CS6, so that may be part of my problem. What I really need to understand is why the merged image looks good and has a good histogram, but the saved TIFF image becomes so dark and has a histogram that pushes all the data to the extremes of the exposure range.
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Hans Kruse
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« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2012, 05:49:35 PM »
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Download a CS6 trial and try with that. You should get exactly the same result as I did.
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Remo Nonaz
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« Reply #22 on: June 28, 2012, 07:25:32 PM »
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OK. I downloaded CS6 and went through the process, even watching Julianne's video again. What happens is that Lr says that it can't display an "unsupported bit depth" (32-bit). I don't think that is supposed to be happening. Is there something I need to do with Lr to enable this? The only other thing that may be a factor is that I did not upgrade the camera RAW plug in as it would only be usable with the CS6 trial. Any suggestions? Huh

I think I found an answer http://blogs.adobe.com/jnack/2012/06/creating-32-bit-hdr-images-in-lightroom-4-1.html. Change file to tif -momentary memory loss. I had to do that with CS4 as well.

The attached image is the file right out of CS6 without modification. No surprise - it looks like the one you did. What I still don't understand is why CS4 is making the image so dark when it does the conversion. Up until that point the process is the same and Lr4 has no difficulties with the merged CS4 file. 
« Last Edit: June 28, 2012, 07:39:38 PM by Remo Nonaz » Logged

I really enjoy using old primes on my m4/3 camera. There's something about having to choose your aperture and actually focusing your camera that makes it so much more like... like... PHOTOGRAPHY!
Tony Jay
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« Reply #23 on: June 28, 2012, 07:35:11 PM »
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Yes the HDR file needs to be saved as a 32-bit TIFF.
This TIFF is then reimported back into Lr4 and edited at one's leisure.

Regards

Tony Jay
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aduke
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« Reply #24 on: June 28, 2012, 08:24:07 PM »
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A relevant question might be, which program, LR or ACR, actually produces the 32bit files. I have a feeling that it is ACR and that LR cannot create a 32 bit file.

I sure wish that it could.

Alan
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Hans Kruse
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« Reply #25 on: June 29, 2012, 02:21:54 AM »
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OK. I downloaded CS6 and went through the process, even watching Julianne's video again. What happens is that Lr says that it can't display an "unsupported bit depth" (32-bit). I don't think that is supposed to be happening. Is there something I need to do with Lr to enable this? The only other thing that may be a factor is that I did not upgrade the camera RAW plug in as it would only be usable with the CS6 trial. Any suggestions? Huh

Do you have the Lightroom 4.1 final release? Also do you open CS6 from Lightroom via selecting the images? The if you do not have ACR7 it is important that you let Lightroom render the image. When you save in CS6 save as 32bit, of course and when back in Lightroom it will handle the 32bit file.
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Hans Kruse
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« Reply #26 on: June 29, 2012, 02:23:36 AM »
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A relevant question might be, which program, LR or ACR, actually produces the 32bit files. I have a feeling that it is ACR and that LR cannot create a 32 bit file.

I sure wish that it could.

Alan

It is CS6 that does the HDR Pro merge. ACR or Lightroom cannot do this and if you read about this, you will see clearly that it is CS6 that makes the 32bit HDR file and Lightroom supports it. So you do the tone mapping in Lightroom 4.1.
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Hans Kruse
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« Reply #27 on: June 29, 2012, 02:27:13 AM »
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The attached image is the file right out of CS6 without modification. No surprise - it looks like the one you did. What I still don't understand is why CS4 is making the image so dark when it does the conversion. Up until that point the process is the same and Lr4 has no difficulties with the merged CS4 file. 

Well that is a surprise! You have no adjustments in the basic panel, so where did you tone map it?

As I said earlier on and showed as well, the file will look very dark in Lightroom when you bring it in from Photoshop and then you need to do the tone mapping in LR where I showed you the adjustments.
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #28 on: June 29, 2012, 03:06:21 AM »
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A relevant question might be, which program, LR or ACR, actually produces the 32bit files. I have a feeling that it is ACR and that LR cannot create a 32 bit file.

Neither.
The 32-bit file is generated in PS.

Regards

Tony Jay
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Remo Nonaz
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« Reply #29 on: June 29, 2012, 09:07:11 AM »
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Hans:

I'm pretty sure that the issue is with CS4. The steps for creating the 32-bit image are exactly the same for CS4 and CS6. The only difference in Lr that I can see is that if you do a control-s in CS6 it automatically imports to LR. I think with CS4 you have to still do an import or folder synchronize to get Lr to find the image.

Once Lr has the image, from either version of CS, the tone mapping and corrections are the same. The problem is that CS4 creates very dark images. I tried some other series and rearranging the files so that the order of the exposed images was different, neither made any difference. The merged file in CS4 looks good until you complete the process and create the 32-bit TIFF file. Then it is too dark. If you create a 16-bit TIFF you can change the exposure and gamma and make the image better, but still not good.

I think the basic issue is with the HDR feature of CS4, though searching around the web, I was not able to find any commentaries about this issue. CS4 has been around for quite a while. One would suppose that if it had a serious flaw in the HDR function there would be some dialog about it.

Also, I've been doing my HDR conversions with .dng files. If I have time, I'll try coverting them to .psd files before running automate/HDR and see if that makes any difference.


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I really enjoy using old primes on my m4/3 camera. There's something about having to choose your aperture and actually focusing your camera that makes it so much more like... like... PHOTOGRAPHY!
Hans Kruse
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« Reply #30 on: June 30, 2012, 05:37:43 AM »
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I cannot really comment on HDR with CS4, only that with CS6 it works really well and despite some images where I had some problems earlier on (especially color shift in overexposed areas of those exposed for the shadows), they now see to have gone away almost. I still see color shift on HDR where the sun is included and all exposures are overexposed close to the sun, e.g. clouds. So instead of replacing these areas with pure white they are not.
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aduke
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« Reply #31 on: June 30, 2012, 10:49:23 AM »
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Neither.
The 32-bit file is generated in PS.

Regards

Tony Jay

I don't understand how PS can generate the 32-bit file. From what does it do the generation?

Thanks for your help on this.

Alan

Edit: I still don't understand how it works, but it certainly seems to work fine with LR4.1 and CS5.
« Last Edit: June 30, 2012, 12:18:05 PM by aduke » Logged
Hans Kruse
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« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2012, 11:02:02 AM »
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Two or more exposures are merged in Photoshop HDR Pro. The result is stored as a 32bit HDR file.
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algrove
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« Reply #33 on: June 30, 2012, 05:34:46 PM »
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I have since LR4 RC2 also played with Photoshop CS5 and CS6 HDR Pro and got mixed results. In some cases the result was absolutely very good and much better than any HDR program I have ever used (have about 4 different ones (not Photoshop)). The problem in some cases were that it seemed like clipped highlights were mixed with non-clipped highlight giving very odd colors in e.g. a sky. In other cases no problem. Since there are no parameters in Photoshop HDR Pro is this a bug in PS HDR Pro? Just to avoid misunderstandings I merged several exposures from shadows with good exposure up to one exposure with no clipped highlights.

In the cases where the above did not happen, the tone mapping in LR4 is really very good and it is possible to make completely natural looking images, so thanks for that, Adobe.

Funny you mention this as just last night I experienced similar problems. Then I tried the same images in HDR EFEX and they turned out much better.  I was trying to get just a blend of like 3, 1 stop brackets, nothing elaborate  and I did not want the "HDR look". EFEX worked and gave me what I was after.

There is probably a better way to accomplish this but I do not remember how to blend in PS5. Maybe I should try LR4.
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