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Author Topic: Abstract landscapes  (Read 59344 times)
texshooter
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« on: June 09, 2012, 11:47:02 PM »
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Would someone recommend a few names of photographers who do amazing abstract landscapes. I'd like to look at their work for inspiration.
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shutterpup
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« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2012, 09:06:39 AM »
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Not sure what you mean by abstract. Michael Orton immediately came to my mind.
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ckimmerle
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« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2012, 10:17:33 AM »
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Not sure exactly what you're looking for, either, but you can check out the work of Cole Thompson
http://www.colethompsonphotography.com/
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"The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes." Marcel Proust

Chuck Kimmerle
WWW.CHUCKKIMMERLE.COM
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« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2012, 10:29:05 AM »
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A member here that goes by the name of John R does exceptional work.
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RSL
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« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2012, 11:10:25 AM »
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Not sure exactly what you're looking for, either, but you can check out the work of Cole Thompson
http://www.colethompsonphotography.com/

Right, Chuck, and the OP might want to check your own "New non-D800 images" over on User Critiques (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=67357.0). Those five shots sure remind me of some of Cole's work.
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texshooter
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« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2012, 02:15:41 PM »
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Here are a couple more:

Frank Grisdale >    http://www.photographersgallery.com/by_artist.asp?id=199

Michael Levin  >    http://www.photographersgallery.com/by_artist.asp?id=175

Susan Burnstine  >   http://www.photographersgallery.com/by_artist.asp?id=252

Michael Massaia  >  http://www.photographersgallery.com/by_artist.asp?id=248

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LoisWakeman
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« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2012, 07:17:08 AM »
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How about William Neill and Leeming + Paterson?

Two fine proponents of ICM (intentional camera movements) - there are many others but these are my favourites so far.
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Pete_G
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« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2012, 11:10:34 AM »
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Edward Burtynsky comes to mind.
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brianrybolt
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« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2012, 04:07:00 AM »
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Check out Mario Giacamelli. 

Brian
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kmeyers
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« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2012, 04:47:15 AM »
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Brett Weston is the undisputed king of abstract. Old school as in film, but amazing vision.
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sailronin
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« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2012, 09:07:50 PM »
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Brett Weston without a doubt.
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Thank you for looking, comments and critiques are always welcome.
Dave

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LoisWakeman
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« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2012, 02:29:39 AM »
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Thanks for introducing me to Frank Grisdale's work, Tex.
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kmeyers
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« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2012, 02:59:03 AM »
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Check out Richard Garrod. Monterey photographer. He new and taught with most of the "masters" like Ansel, Brett Weston, Wynn Bullock and others.  He is still alive in his 80's and still extremely active in photography. 

http://richardgarrodphoto.com/
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bill t.
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« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2012, 11:46:25 PM »
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Marc Adamus slumps towards a kind of Technicolor Abstraction.  The kind of stuff I deplored in my stuck-up youth, but now have to grudgingly admire in my stuck-up old age.
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texshooter
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« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2012, 11:39:56 PM »
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chip phillips pushes the color too.

http://www.chipphillipsphotography.com/galleries
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Rob C
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« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2012, 05:35:31 AM »
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Marc Adamus slumps towards a kind of Technicolor Abstraction.  The kind of stuff I deplored in my stuck-up youth, but now have to grudgingly admire in my stuck-up old age.


That, Bill, is because he does it very well. A brief study of 80s stock-shot catalogues would show how popular this style was.

Rob C
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Mjollnir
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« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2012, 12:06:20 PM »
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Marc Adamus slumps towards a kind of Technicolor Abstraction.  The kind of stuff I deplored in my stuck-up youth, but now have to grudgingly admire in my stuck-up old age.

Adamus freely admits he leans heavily on Photoshop, but his compositions trump any over-doing in post.

That, and he's got sort of this Eyvind Earle vibe to his stuff that I really like.
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John R
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« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2012, 09:32:36 PM »
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Here is one that I would like to introduce people to: http://www.stephenpatterson.com/index.html

While not strictly landscape, it is an example of what good abstract images are all about. And bear in mind, most of the images were taken with slide film, where what you see is what you get.

JMR
« Last Edit: July 12, 2012, 09:34:31 PM by John R » Logged
Rob C
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« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2012, 05:32:55 AM »
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Here is one that I would like to introduce people to: http://www.stephenpatterson.com/index.html

While not strictly landscape, it is an example of what good abstract images are all about. And bear in mind, most of the images were taken with slide film, where what you see is what you get.JMR




Now that's a bit of a far-fetched one! It's no more set in stone with film than it is with digital: scanning and computers have bent the rules. Even before digital came humping its way down the lane we could manipulate film in all sorts of ways - not as easily, I grant you - but the literal representation was left far behind when one chose so to leave it. Hell, your photographer should know, having been around Hass for a couple of years!

Regarding the site: I think he has a great eye for shape but, in my view, he destroys much of what he has by doing fanciful treatments that, in the end, I feel take away from the basic honesty and worth of what he has going for him underneath the visual schmaltz. I am no lover of candy-coloured sandmen.

Rob C
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John R
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« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2012, 05:37:22 PM »
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OK Rob, your point is taken, photographs are not reality and can and are often manipulated. However, I don't think there is any comparison between today's manipulations with PS and digital files and the manipulations done with film. Mr Patterson and others went all over the continent doing shows with slides right out of the camera long before digital. Except for Orton's that were done by sandwiching two slides, and other sandwiching techniques, the images were done in-camera using multiple exposure and -camera or subject movement- techniques. In the days before digital he discovered that the camera can still be used to create incredible imagery.  I understand, today even he does Orton work digitally. I don't think he was trying to be pure. And my whole point is to emphasize how good the work is considering it was done with slides. I think the compositions, regardless of some manipulations, and the large body of work, is the best I have seen on the net in terms of abstract-like work.

JMR
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