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Author Topic: Photojournalist David Burnett on the two that got away  (Read 3824 times)
Ellis Vener
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« on: June 18, 2012, 12:43:41 PM »
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http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/forty-years-after-napalm-girl-picture-a-photographer-reflects-on-the-moment-that-might-have-been-his/2012/06/13/gJQAfoToeV_story_1.html

In the new digital age of 1,000-plus pictures on a memory card, running out of “film” is less likely. But being aware is still what photography is about. Being able to see that bigger world and your place in it. And knowing that, at any time, a picture could take place.(emphasis mine). So, today, I try to always have a few frames of film left, and plenty of space on my memory card. Always.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
stamper
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2012, 02:54:50 AM »
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You could try taking a second, or a third, card with you. Wink
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Rob C
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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2012, 03:54:51 AM »
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You could try taking a second, or a third, card with you. Wink


That's probably standard practice for a pro; however, I consciously limit myself to the 77 frames that I get on the D700 with each of my usual cards. Why? because if I shoot more, then I have to wade through more stuff of which I shall reject the vast majority. It takes up too much life.

It's worse than film for me now in amateur status: with film, at least I would have been conscious of cost, but with digital it's only time that can bring the sense of reality, the cost of time wasted in the pursuit of what? It's very difficult to believe that photography brings its own reward, or if it does, I must have been a very naughty chap at some time.

Now that I think of it, perhaps that's the benefit/payback of amateur landscape shooting on sheet flm: you get to consider things more clearly, the relative value, the proportionality between waiting and clicking.

Rob C
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stamper
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2012, 04:02:48 AM »
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The problem of limiting yourself is if you see something mildly interesting and don't take it and afterwards you see nothing better you have missed out? Conversely if you take 77 frames that is mildly interesting and then see a subject that stands out do you walk away and not take it or break your rule? Or do you delete images taken to stay within your rule? Rules are like straight jackets?
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2012, 09:28:30 AM »
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You could try taking a second, or a third, card with you. Wink
And what do you do if you are busy changing out memory cards while that once in a life time moment occurs?  larger memory cards are one answer, using cameras with two media slots is another.

If you are a working professional photographer or photojournalist (like David Burnett  is: see http://www.davidburnett.com/index.html ) not shooting so you'll save editing time later is not an option.  
« Last Edit: June 19, 2012, 09:31:14 AM by Ellis Vener » Logged

Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
theguywitha645d
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« Reply #5 on: June 19, 2012, 09:45:26 AM »
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And what do you do if you are busy changing out memory cards while that once in a life time moment occurs?

And how will you know when that will happen? Running out of space/film is an occupational hazard. You cannot plan for once in a lifetime moments.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #6 on: June 19, 2012, 10:28:11 AM »
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And how will you know when that will happen? Running out of space/film is an occupational hazard. You cannot plan for once in a lifetime moments.

No but you can prepare yourself for the possibility of events like that happening.

Preparation starts with every moment is a "once in a lifetime occurrence" and embracing the idea that the three Muses of great photography -Luck, Chance, and Fortune - favor the prepared mind.

You also need to embrace the reality that you'll always miss something, and the perception that the more intensely you work or play at doing what you do, the more keenly aware you are of having missed an opportunity. The trick is not to let that perception tie you into knots.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
k bennett
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« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2012, 11:49:26 AM »
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And what do you do if you are busy changing out memory cards while that once in a life time moment occurs?  

Well, it is significantly faster to change cards than it was to change film, especially with an old Leica (which is what DB was using in this story.) And a working photojournalist should be able to do so by feel, in the dark, just like changing lenses or any settings on the camera.
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Rob C
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« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2012, 03:39:42 PM »
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Nope; the truth is, if those 77 shots are mediocre, which they might well be, then maybe they shouldn't have been taken in the first place. What on Earth were you going to do with them? Perhaps that's one good reason for becoming a chimper: you can cut the crap as you go along. Personally, I just don't even chimp; Nikon's Matrix is so damned good there's no point unless you're trying to get that once-in-a-lifetime perfect file. I'd rather get an interesting image, and that's rare enough as it is!

Rob C
« Last Edit: June 19, 2012, 03:43:42 PM by Rob C » Logged

Ellis Vener
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« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2012, 04:06:48 PM »
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I'd rather get an interesting image, and that's rare enough as it is!
Ain't that the truth!
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
OldRoy
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« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2012, 04:17:25 AM »
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The "delete" key is, in the broadest sense, an under-utilised facility.
Roy
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