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Author Topic: Best 60 (64") inch printer?  (Read 6036 times)
ZOG
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« on: June 26, 2012, 10:15:18 PM »
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I have an "old" epson 11880. I'm looking at a second printer. Is the 11880 still the best way to go? Are HP or Canon better? We prints on different types of paper...

Thanks!

Andre
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Ernst Dinkla
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« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2012, 03:11:17 AM »
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Rumor has it that there will be a Canon iPF9300 this year. What HP or Epson will change in their catalog remains a question.


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Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

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aaronchan
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« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2012, 08:59:28 AM »
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I always believe having 2 identical printers is an advantage for a production house.

Aaron
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Atlex.com
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« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2012, 10:29:14 AM »
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This basically depends on what you're printing.  Epson has their Eco-solvent printers in the 64" area where the 60" models are the pigment version.  Canon has their 60" pigment printer which is a great model as well.  HP does, but we don't sell many of HP.  Epson and Canon are our 2 tops models.

If you had questions on which one to go with for a second printer, you can talk to one of our sales reps.  They have sold many 60"-64" models between Epson and Canon.

Both models are great to use and produce great pictures.

Chris W
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lfeagan
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« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2012, 10:48:27 AM »
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I always believe having 2 identical printers is an advantage for a production house.

Aaron

While I fully agree and take this approach with my own IT equipment, it is not without potential risk. The advantages are things like parts compatibility, reduced training, reduced supplies inventory. The risk is that if you choose unwisely, you now have multiple machines that are lemons. Diversification, while more costly, reduces the risks from being overly dependent on a single manufacturer, supplier, maintenance provider and of choosing a lemon of a product. When buying two similar pieces of equipment, I like to analyze them for unique features and determine if that uniqueness will provide extra value. For example, one printer might be better at dealing with sheet media while the other was better at canvas. Assuming that you do both sheet and canvas, you might find that having two different printers provides a value greater than the extra costs. Yes, its a contrived example, but I think the concept behind the analysis is clear. Until you get into ridiculously expensive items, most manufacturers have a particular target set of features/capabilities that they prioritize to meet their price objective.
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Lance

Nikon: D700, D800E, PC-E 24mm f/3.5D ED, PC-E 45mm f/2.8D ED, PC-E 85mm f/2.8D, 50mm f/1.4G, 14-24 f/2.8G ED, 24-70 f/2.8G ED, 70-200 f/2.8G ED VR II, 400mm f/2.8G ED VR
Fuji: X-Pro 1, 14mm f/2.8, 18mm f/2.0, 35mm f/1.4
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« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2012, 08:02:28 PM »
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This basically depends on what you're printing.  Epson has their Eco-solvent printers in the 64" area where the 60" models are the pigment version.

Epson doesn't make a 60" printer - the pigment in that category is the 11880 which is 64".
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Atlex.com
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« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2012, 08:41:54 AM »
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You are correct on the 11880 size.  Was just typing faster than I was thinking.  Had it in the right size area at least.
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