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Author Topic: "real world" moire & the D800E  (Read 6382 times)
adrian tyler
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« on: July 03, 2012, 10:55:43 AM »
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Hi
I've been using the D800E for a few weeks now and have had no instances of Moire, not really long enough to tell if it's going to present any obsticles. So I'd appreciate hearing other D800E users "real world" experiences, also if you have run into it, is there an "on-site" solution. changing the f-stop etc...
thanks very much!
adrian
http://adriantyler.net/home.html
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2012, 11:37:35 AM »
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The only  subjects I have moire issues with are those with tight fine patterns: woven fabrics, brick buildings shot squarely on (in a test looking for moire. Oddly or interestingly once the working with the D800 and D800E made me aware of the issue it became much easier to spot it's occurrence in images shot with other lower resolution cameras like the 1Ds Mark III.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
GeraldB
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« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2012, 10:39:27 AM »
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I shot a wedding recently and saw quite a few instances of moire on clothing. I'm not a pro wedding shooter, this was for a family event. As mentioned its quite easy to see at 100% but not otherwise. I removed some of it more to try out the capability in LRM4. It easily removes the color moire but less so for the pattern. Since the request was for web size images I exported them as 1024 jpgs and you cannot see it.
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narikin
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« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2012, 03:12:20 PM »
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It very much depends what you shoot. If you shoot natural landscapes, you'll never see it. (note the name of this forum, and ask why Michael says he never sees it...) If you shoot citiscapes in direct sunlight at optimum apertures, you'll see it. Grills of Air conditioners, distant brickwork, clothing of someone bang in focus at a particular distance, etc:

If you are a nature photographer, forget about it. non-issue
If you shoots textiles, or clothing, get the regular 800, non-E. why make life difficult?
If you are a all around photographer, it really depends if you are comfortable with doing retouching work on some shots, in exchange for a slightly sharper image.
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dhale
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« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2012, 07:18:18 AM »
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I have seen it on a shot taken thru a window screen. If you see it while shooting, you can change the angle, tilt the camera slightly.  Modify the geometry of the shot slightly until it is no longer an issue.

I unexpected, happened upon The Air Force Band in concert Tuesday evening in Santa Rosa, New Mexico.  I shot them at dusk outdoors with the D800e and a AF-S NIkkor 24mm f/1.4.  It was a blast.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2012, 09:15:18 AM »
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I have seen it on a shot taken thru a window screen. If you see it while shooting, you can change the angle, tilt the camera slightly.  Modify the geometry of the shot slightly until it is no longer an issue.

To quote a famous L-L contributor: "duh". Superimposing two fine meshes that are close to the same frequency  on each other will usually result in moire patterning, no matter what camera you use or even if you don't use a camera at all. Changing geometry also includes changing your distance to the screen and changing len focal length.

One of the things working with the D800 has taught me is to make me more aware of  potential moire issues with all cameras.
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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
adrian tyler
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« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2012, 03:37:36 PM »
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thanks for the feedback!
i had one serious case of moire with an m9 and one of those fancy new buildings
clad in corrigated aluminium
sounds like a good idea to use the d800 when architecture and fabric are involved
thanks again
adrian
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FredBGG
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« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2012, 12:27:41 AM »
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It very much depends what you shoot. If you shoot natural landscapes, you'll never see it. (note the name of this forum, and ask why Michael says he never sees it...) If you shoot citiscapes in direct sunlight at optimum apertures, you'll see it. Grills of Air conditioners, distant brickwork, clothing of someone bang in focus at a particular distance, etc:

If you are a nature photographer, forget about it. non-issue


Moire can show up in landscapes. Rock grain, wood grain, ice textures and even certain foliage.
Moire is an issue, but cam be removed.
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2012, 09:45:19 AM »
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Moire can show up in landscapes. Rock grain, wood grain, ice textures and even certain foliage.
Moire is an issue, but cam be removed.
I suppose it can but I've used Medium format since the original 16mp Kodak back,  a Leica m9, now an 800e, and I've only seen it when shooting something man made.  On rare occasions I've had a little false color resulting from the de-moisaicing, but to me there is a difference between moire and false color. False color is easier to remove, since with moire you sometimes can eliminate the color issues but the pattern remains and can be more difficult.
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FredBGG
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« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2012, 11:34:46 AM »
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I suppose it can but I've used Medium format since the original 16mp Kodak back,  a Leica m9, now an 800e, and I've only seen it when shooting something man made.  On rare occasions I've had a little false color resulting from the de-moisaicing, but to me there is a difference between moire and false color. False color is easier to remove, since with moire you sometimes can eliminate the color issues but the pattern remains and can be more difficult.

I have seen it in a photos of certain tree bark and split trunks, bamboo groves, animal fur. All in situations with high contrast light or relatively close up
on very clear days. With natural subjects moiree tends to be in small bands as the  interfering texture frequency tends to be over smaller areas. False color is more common. Removing both results in softer images than using a sensor with an AA filter.
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