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Author Topic: The Making of Pilbara Storm  (Read 12463 times)
Tony Jay
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« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2012, 08:45:06 PM »
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Peter does have a point.

In Australia there is nothing subtle about the palette of colour one could be confronted with.

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Tony Jay
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« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2012, 11:48:02 PM »
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Having been to the region (Pilbara) many times, and throughout regional Australia for most of my life, I think that Peter's colours are accurate both in a literal sense and an emotional sense.  The images are dramatic, but that's how it feels!
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Isaac
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« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2012, 09:41:35 AM »
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I know my work polarizes people - but at least I am noticed!

(Humour) “Of course, you know the adage, if you can’t make it good, make it big. If you can’t make it big, make it red. So we do like big red photographs.”

New York Times - December 3, 2006
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viewfinder
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« Reply #23 on: July 13, 2012, 10:36:17 AM »
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Some interesting replies and attitudes so far.......

Personally, I don't, and have never, thought that photography either can or should be bound by the same criteria as graphic art,....while a work of art can utilise 'artists licence', a different set of 'rules' exists for photography due to the unwritten parameters that society places upon it........

Unfortunately, once a photograph crosses the line into looking 'fake' it's integrity is lost for me.....and, it woul dhave been better for the photographer to have set aside his camera and reached for brushes and canvas.

As members of western societies we are bombarded from morning to night with highly skilled image making, and, without any concious thought we are all expert at interpreting images.  In recent times the verb 'to photoshop' has passed into common English usage just as a previous generation finally accepted the verb 'to airbrush'.   Sadly these phrases are not usually employed positively, especially by non-photographers.

Fortunately, it is not inscribed on any tablet of stone that photography has to be realistic,..but it IS an unwritten rule that it must at least tempt the viewer to believe,...and Pilbara Storm does not do so, for me anyway.....

I'm quite sure that the over dramatic treatment will enable large sales if the right gallery space can be aquired and prints might well sell for large sums,........and, in a few months or years, for much lesser sums in a street market near to you.   The people who will love this are not going to see the incongruity of the piece, or question the non-reality of sky with landscape, it's only the drama that speaks  momentarily....and that came from photoshop.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2012, 10:39:10 AM by viewfinder » Logged
MarkL
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« Reply #24 on: July 13, 2012, 10:46:11 AM »
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Some interesting replies and attitudes so far.......

Personally, I don't, and have never, thought that photography either can or should be bound by the same criteria as graphic art,....while a work of art can utilise 'artists licence', a different set of 'rules' exists for photography due to the unwritten parameters that society places upon it........

Unfortunately, once a photograph crosses the line into looking 'fake' it's integrity is lost for me.....and, it woul dhave been better for the photographer to have set aside his camera and reached for brushes and canvas.

As members of western societies we are bombarded from morning to night with highly skilled image making, and, without any concious thought we are all expert at interpreting images.  In recent times the verb 'to photoshop' has passed into common English usage just as a previous generation finally accepted the verb 'to airbrush'.   Sadly these phrases are not usually employed positively, especially by non-photographers.

Fortunately, it is not inscribed on any tablet of stone that photography has to be realistic,..but it IS an unwritten rule that it must at least tempt the viewer to believe,...and Pilbara Storm does not do so, for me anyway.....

I'm quite sure that the over dramatic treatment will enable large sales if the right gallery space can be aquired and prints might well sell for large sums,........and, in a few months or years, for much lesser sums in a street market near to you.   The people who will love this are not going to see the incongruity of the piece, or question the non-reality of sky with landscape, it's only the drama that speaks  momentarily....and that came from photoshop.

Agreed. This image isn't quite as bad as others showcased here thoughf or example the making of sugarloaf rock http://www.luminous-landscape.com/essays/the_making_of_sugarloaf_rock.shtml
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Isaac
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« Reply #25 on: July 13, 2012, 11:24:51 AM »
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Personally, I don't, and have never, thought that... the unwritten parameters that society places upon it...

(Gently) Maybe "unwritten parameters" are just assumption and ignorance?

Maybe, in this iPhone instagram age, non-photographers think it's ordinary to make their snapshots moody?
« Last Edit: July 13, 2012, 12:00:51 PM by Isaac » Logged
Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #26 on: July 13, 2012, 02:09:26 PM »
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... Maybe, in this iPhone instagram age, non-photographers think it's ordinary to make their snapshots moody?

Or, perhaps, in this everyone-is-photographer age, where everyone can produce a decent, "normal" photograph, people would prefer to see photographs that THEY can not make? That is, photographs beyond "normal" and real, hence the popularity of Instagrams, HDRs and obviously photoshopped images. Perhaps people want to escape from reality? Isn't that the the same reason beyond the popularity of Sci-Fi, fairy tales, historic fantasies, imaginary friends?
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Isaac
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« Reply #27 on: July 13, 2012, 02:32:29 PM »
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Or, perhaps, in this everyone-is-photographer age, where everyone can produce a decent, "normal" photograph, people would prefer to see photographs that THEY can not make? That is, photographs beyond "normal" and real, hence the popularity of Instagrams, HDRs and obviously photoshopped images.

Well, in the same way that the technical skills required to produce that "normal" photograph are now more or less within my competence (which wasn't true enough for me 35 years ago); the technical skills required to post-process that photograph into something else entirely are also now vastly less, and with a much faster cycle time between experiment and visible results.

In this everyone-is-photographer age, there are fewer and fewer photographs that they can not make.
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #28 on: July 13, 2012, 03:33:24 PM »
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(... the technical skills required to post-process that photograph into something else entirely are also now vastly less...

I would compare it to English language: many speak it, few well.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #29 on: July 13, 2012, 05:13:40 PM »
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I would compare it to English language: many speak it, few well.
+1.
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LesPalenik
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« Reply #30 on: July 13, 2012, 06:04:00 PM »
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Unfortunately, once a photograph crosses the line into looking 'fake' it's integrity is lost for me.....and, it woul dhave been better for the photographer to have set aside his camera and reached for brushes and canvas.

Unfortunately, not everybody is as skilled with brushes as with Photoshop sliders. And even worse, there are just too many "artistic" plugins to experiment with.
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Isaac
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« Reply #31 on: July 13, 2012, 06:39:13 PM »
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I would compare it to English language: many speak it, few well.
Yes, although we might be shifting the goal posts.

We started with - everyone can produce a decent "normal" photograph - not - everyone can use a camera well.
When you think about the few who can use a camera well, maybe you're thinking about exceptional photographs rather than decent "normal" photographs.
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Farmer
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« Reply #32 on: July 14, 2012, 02:59:51 AM »
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It's a classic response, I know, but I hope all these people who seem to object to Peter's shot also object to Ansel Adams and, well, pretty much any black and white (since that's NOT how it looked, obviously).
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viewfinder
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« Reply #33 on: July 14, 2012, 03:47:23 AM »
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......I don't know the work of Adams especially well since I'm English, however those of his images that I have seen reproduced are quite acceptable because, unlike Pilbara Storm, the artifice does not overshadow the content.

Viewers of B/W photographs (in western societies) understand that they are looking at a scene which has been rendered into monotone from any natural colouring,...as I mentioned before; western society is very skilled at interpretation of image, often without understanding why or how.   However, in photography believability is everything and Pilbara Storm does not have it.......
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« Reply #34 on: July 14, 2012, 03:59:19 AM »
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I'm curious - have you actually been to the Pilbara, or outback Australia, generally?

Anyway, we won't agree, as you're in favour of literalism for photography (which is fine).

BTW, Adam's work (and I'm not American either) could hardly be described as "photorealistic", yet he's quite rightly one of the most celebrated photographers.
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #35 on: July 14, 2012, 04:38:37 AM »
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I am with Phil here.

No-one is denying, least of all Peter Eastway, that the image has been processed according to a style that Peter Eastway favours.
The believability of the result is completely another issue.
Actually the reds found in the Pilbara, not to mention large parts of inland Australia (often referred to as the "Red Centre") are absolutely extraordinary.

Along with Phil I happen to be a local (Australian as opposed to West Australian where the Pilbara is actually located) and I have actually visited these places (with camera in hand) and can attest first hand to the amazing reds.

Perhaps I sound a bit like a travel agent here but you could do worse than bring you and your camera on a trip "Down Under" to photograph the amazing deserts and savannahs of Australia. I am due to spend five weeks in the Kimberleys (also in Western Australia) shortly with the sole purpose of shooting the country. Unfortunately I won't make to the Pilbara on this trip but I promise you it is high on the "bucket list".

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Tony Jay
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« Reply #36 on: July 14, 2012, 04:58:16 AM »
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I'm jealous of your 5 week trip, Tony :-)
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #37 on: July 14, 2012, 05:23:49 AM »
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I'm jealous of your 5 week trip, Tony :-)
Yes, hard to think about it without drooling!

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Tony Jay
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #38 on: July 14, 2012, 08:06:41 AM »
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......I don't know the work of Adams especially well since I'm English, however those of his images that I have seen reproduced are quite acceptable because, unlike Pilbara Storm, the artifice does not overshadow the content.

Viewers of B/W photographs (in western societies) understand that they are looking at a scene which has been rendered into monotone from any natural colouring,...as I mentioned before; western society is very skilled at interpretation of image, often without understanding why or how.   However, in photography believability is everything and Pilbara Storm does not have it.......
This got me to thinking about the many photographs I've seen of "Red Rock" country in the southwestern U.S.A. In New England where I live I have never seen any rock that isn't some shade of gray. So color photos of Red Rock scenes would look much more believable to me if the reds were changed to gray while other colors were left alone (skies blue, foliage green, etc.)

I've never been to Pilbara, but I find Eastway's rendering quite plausible.
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Patricia Sheley
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« Reply #39 on: July 14, 2012, 08:56:07 AM »
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This got me to thinking about the many photographs I've seen of "Red Rock" country in the southwestern U.S.A. In New England where I live I have never seen any rock that isn't some shade of gray. So color photos of Red Rock scenes would look much more believable to me if the reds were changed to gray while other colors were left alone (skies blue, foliage green, etc.)

I've never been to Pilbara, but I find Eastway's rendering quite plausible.

I find this self querying thought insightful ....and inspirational toward a vision past surface and obvious... there will always be the battle of why we photograph, what a photograph is or should be...but there is so much more ...the expression of exuberance of the moment as we experienced it at the time or during the time of wait and seeing more deeply. Yes, there are the old tunes of not the score , but the performance, but even that partial expression of how Ansel actually was fighting out these questions in his mind, alongside others in the short-lived group 64, during the battles leading up to the first MoMA exhibits etc, to say nothing of the arrival on scene of Edwin Land ( Land camera ) and how this helped to inform in the pre-visualization
« Last Edit: July 14, 2012, 09:18:12 AM by Patricia Sheley » Logged

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