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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #20 on: July 29, 2012, 02:22:01 PM »
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I have no idea about any other consideration, but here would be my concern: what would I want to leave as the last stop? If everything goes according to plan, it really would not matter. But any unexpected snag, delay, change of plans, etc. could lead to not having enough days left for the last stop. So, do I want to miss (or spend less than planned in) Grand Canyon (AZ) or Zion (UT)? My personal choice would be to have enough time for GC, and miss (or shorten) Zion. You or others might disagree, but that would be my concern.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 06:56:59 PM by Slobodan Blagojevic » Logged

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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #21 on: July 29, 2012, 03:39:27 PM »
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Also foot wear and clothing? I'm not going to be going on long hikes more working out of my car and short hikes to get a good shot (just finished hernia surgery which will be healed well before Sept but I still need to minimize activities that are too strenuous) In Hawaii there are no poisonous critters so I've preferred Merrel hiking sneakers and shorts, but I'm thinking a good pair of hiking boots would be appropriate and jeans?
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
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« Reply #22 on: July 29, 2012, 08:21:06 PM »
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If you are staying on established trails and not carrying much weight, a sturdy pair of walking shoes with good arch support  should be about all you need. Get a few weeks of wear on them before you go. If you get a sturdy hiking boot, get them fitted by someone that knows what they are doing. And then live in them. Get good, thick, hiking socks when you do the fitting.

i usually wear hiking shorts with zip on legs. Jeans will just leave you cold and wet especially in a transition season like September in the mountains. A goretex jacket is really nice to keep from getting soaked with the occasional shower/snow. Wool works as well.

Check out the park pages on critters if you want information about snakes. Talk to the rangers. Just don't go sticking your hands into crevices or under things.  Try not to walk through log or brush piles. Most will try to get away unless you corner or surprise them.
http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/documents/LWVR.pdf

Think in terms of elevation as well for your routing. 500-1000 feet elevation can mean a different micro-climate.

There are a couple REI stores around Las Vegas. Recommended if you need anything outdoor activity related at the last minute.
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francois
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« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2012, 02:46:32 AM »
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If you are staying on established trails and not carrying much weight, a sturdy pair of walking shoes with good arch support  should be about all you need. Get a few weeks of wear on them before you go. If you get a sturdy hiking boot, get them fitted by someone that knows what they are doing. And then live in them. Get good, thick, hiking socks when you do the fitting.

i usually wear hiking shorts with zip on legs. Jeans will just leave you cold and wet especially in a transition season like September in the mountains. A goretex jacket is really nice to keep from getting soaked with the occasional shower/snow. Wool works as well.

Check out the park pages on critters if you want information about snakes. Talk to the rangers. Just don't go sticking your hands into crevices or under things.  Try not to walk through log or brush piles. Most will try to get away unless you corner or surprise them.
http://www.azgfd.gov/w_c/documents/LWVR.pdf

Think in terms of elevation as well for your routing. 500-1000 feet elevation can mean a different micro-climate.

There are a couple REI stores around Las Vegas. Recommended if you need anything outdoor activity related at the last minute.

I agree, a good pair of trail hikers is more than enough. In September, at higher elevation, mornings can get chilly. A light insulating vest or jacket is handy.

I think that you can get everything you'll need and good suggestions at the different REI stores in LV.
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Francois
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« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2012, 05:53:26 PM »
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I'm coming in late to the party, but given I love this area of the states, I'll chime in with my thoughts, which likely will mirror some of what you've read already.

First off - I personally don't have a problem with going to "iconic" sites that have been "over-photographed" - there's usually a reason those places are iconic, and there's nothing wrong with getting your own version of them, and then, should you have time and another chance at the area in the future, venturing further off the beaten path to discover some less-shot areas. I sometimes find that by going "contrarian" with lens selection at the popular places, I get some different shots (example: I like to shoot longer glass at the sand dunes and at Bryce, whereas most people bring super wides).

Basically, if I could have only one trip to the Southwest in general, I'd want to do:

My "Don't Miss" list would be:
- Sunrise at Dead Horse Point State Park (near Canyonlands)
- Sunrise at Mesa Arch in Canyonlands (be there EARLY, claim your spot, you won't be alone, and it's tight)
- Sunrise and Sunset (both) at the Sand Dunes in Death Valley (tips: park closer to stovepipe wells on the side of road, don't park at the "parking lot" area, and for gods sake, bring water and gatorade like you don't even know, even for a short mile into the dunes - this place can get brutal)
- Sunrise at Zabriske Point in Death Valley, even though it's been done a lot. Still knocks me out every time, and I'm on my 8th visit later this year myself.
- Opening couple hours in the AM at Lower Antelope Canyon near Page on the photographers pass. (I'd skip Upper Antelope entirely, but that's just me)
- Sunrise at Point Imperial at the Grand Canyon North Rim (I'd skip the South Rim entirely, but that's just me)

And then the rest would be:
- Sunset at the Cape Royale overlook at the Grand Canyon North Rim
- Sunrise at Bryce Point at Bryce Canyon (be there EARLY, expect massive crowds from the early arriving tour bus - still, worth seeing before you die)
- Sunrise at the Windows section of Arches NP
- 11:15am give or take at Horseshoe Bend overlook, also near Page. Watch the freaking edge - no guardrail, long, long way down.
- The major overlooks of Canyonlands in the early pre-sunset evening hours
- Sunset and post sunset at the Badwater salt flats in Death Valley (see my earlier comment about water, water, and more water, and then more water)
- The rimrocks hoodoo's area between Page and Kanab, off 89. A short (.8 mile one way) to the hoodoo's, glorious late afternoon / early evening light on the couple formations there - actually one of my favorite areas to just work and relax, without horrible crowds. Bring GPS as you can get tangled up finding your way out if you're not paying attention.
- A run through Zion both in the early and late hours.
- The run on hwy 12 near Boulder and Escalante, UT
- A stop by Jacob Lake Inn on the way into the North Rim, just because the place is cool. Okay, I'll fess up. It's because they have really good, and really big, cookies. (Be advised it's 1-2 hours from there to any of the big viewpoints, but it's a nice place if you don't mind the travel distance)

I'll echo what others have said about distance, I-70 (truly magnificent piece of interstate from where 191 hits it from Arches to where it terminates at I-15 to the west - some amazing scenery for sure), and being careful where you stick your hands regarding snakes and other critters.

I'll also say that by far the biggest piece of advice is this: WATER and emergency supplies. I had a breakdown earlier this year out that way, and even being just a short distance from Vegas, it took nearly four hours to get a tow truck to get me back to the rental car facility and get another car. It was well into the 100's, and that was a long, hot wait. If you're in this scenario somewhere remote (say, Death Valley) without cell signal, you better damn well have at least a days worth of water and some food to keep you going, or you might be beef jerky for the buzzards by the morning. Particularly in Death Valley, water is key and critical - that park is NO JOKE when it comes to heat and potential danger.  I'd advise buying at least 12 liters of water right off the bat at the nearest convenience mart as you leave the rental car facility at McCarran (or wherever you're flying into).

Also be SURE to check in with the ranger stations for road conditions. The Kanab, UT BLM office is particularly nice - and right off the main road in Kanab, and worth stopping by if you're in that neck of the woods. (There's also a good barbershop a block or so away if you need such service). The roads vary a lot - a dirt track that is fine one month can be brutal the next. When I was in the area in May, Cottonwood Canyon road was said to be brutally impassable, but the word I heard was by June it was better again. And of course, don't even remotely think about the slot canyons if there is any flash flood danger.

Lodging wise: I like the Quality Inn in Cedar City, Ruby's in Bryce, the Sleep Inn in Moab, the Quality Inn in Page, and your pick of casino's in Vegas Smiley

-m

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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #25 on: July 30, 2012, 11:26:59 PM »
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I'm coming in late to the party, but given I love this area of the states, I'll chime in with my thoughts, which likely will mirror some of what you've read already.

First off - I personally don't have a problem with going to "iconic" sites that have been "over-photographed" - there's usually a reason those places are iconic, and there's nothing wrong with getting your own version of them, and then, should you have time and another chance at the area in the future, venturing further off the beaten path to discover some less-shot areas. I sometimes find that by going "contrarian" with lens selection at the popular places, I get some different shots (example: I like to shoot longer glass at the sand dunes and at Bryce, whereas most people bring super wides).

Basically, if I could have only one trip to the Southwest in general, I'd want to do:

My "Don't Miss" list would be:
- Sunrise at Dead Horse Point State Park (near Canyonlands)
- Sunrise at Mesa Arch in Canyonlands (be there EARLY, claim your spot, you won't be alone, and it's tight)
- Sunrise and Sunset (both) at the Sand Dunes in Death Valley (tips: park closer to stovepipe wells on the side of road, don't park at the "parking lot" area, and for gods sake, bring water and gatorade like you don't even know, even for a short mile into the dunes - this place can get brutal)
- Sunrise at Zabriske Point in Death Valley, even though it's been done a lot. Still knocks me out every time, and I'm on my 8th visit later this year myself.
- Opening couple hours in the AM at Lower Antelope Canyon near Page on the photographers pass. (I'd skip Upper Antelope entirely, but that's just me)
- Sunrise at Point Imperial at the Grand Canyon North Rim (I'd skip the South Rim entirely, but that's just me)

And then the rest would be:
- Sunset at the Cape Royale overlook at the Grand Canyon North Rim
- Sunrise at Bryce Point at Bryce Canyon (be there EARLY, expect massive crowds from the early arriving tour bus - still, worth seeing before you die)
- Sunrise at the Windows section of Arches NP
- 11:15am give or take at Horseshoe Bend overlook, also near Page. Watch the freaking edge - no guardrail, long, long way down.
- The major overlooks of Canyonlands in the early pre-sunset evening hours
- Sunset and post sunset at the Badwater salt flats in Death Valley (see my earlier comment about water, water, and more water, and then more water)
- The rimrocks hoodoo's area between Page and Kanab, off 89. A short (.8 mile one way) to the hoodoo's, glorious late afternoon / early evening light on the couple formations there - actually one of my favorite areas to just work and relax, without horrible crowds. Bring GPS as you can get tangled up finding your way out if you're not paying attention.
- A run through Zion both in the early and late hours.
- The run on hwy 12 near Boulder and Escalante, UT
- A stop by Jacob Lake Inn on the way into the North Rim, just because the place is cool. Okay, I'll fess up. It's because they have really good, and really big, cookies. (Be advised it's 1-2 hours from there to any of the big viewpoints, but it's a nice place if you don't mind the travel distance)

I'll echo what others have said about distance, I-70 (truly magnificent piece of interstate from where 191 hits it from Arches to where it terminates at I-15 to the west - some amazing scenery for sure), and being careful where you stick your hands regarding snakes and other critters.

I'll also say that by far the biggest piece of advice is this: WATER and emergency supplies. I had a breakdown earlier this year out that way, and even being just a short distance from Vegas, it took nearly four hours to get a tow truck to get me back to the rental car facility and get another car. It was well into the 100's, and that was a long, hot wait. If you're in this scenario somewhere remote (say, Death Valley) without cell signal, you better damn well have at least a days worth of water and some food to keep you going, or you might be beef jerky for the buzzards by the morning. Particularly in Death Valley, water is key and critical - that park is NO JOKE when it comes to heat and potential danger.  I'd advise buying at least 12 liters of water right off the bat at the nearest convenience mart as you leave the rental car facility at McCarran (or wherever you're flying into).

Also be SURE to check in with the ranger stations for road conditions. The Kanab, UT BLM office is particularly nice - and right off the main road in Kanab, and worth stopping by if you're in that neck of the woods. (There's also a good barbershop a block or so away if you need such service). The roads vary a lot - a dirt track that is fine one month can be brutal the next. When I was in the area in May, Cottonwood Canyon road was said to be brutally impassable, but the word I heard was by June it was better again. And of course, don't even remotely think about the slot canyons if there is any flash flood danger.

Lodging wise: I like the Quality Inn in Cedar City, Ruby's in Bryce, the Sleep Inn in Moab, the Quality Inn in Page, and your pick of casino's in Vegas Smiley

-m



Wow!
Thanks
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
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« Reply #26 on: July 31, 2012, 09:50:08 AM »
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A minivan is a better bet than an suv.  Add a sleeping bag and you have  emergency accommodations. There's nothing like waking up on location.
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #27 on: August 01, 2012, 02:57:24 PM »
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Well I've had a few days with Laurent Martres books and an atlas here is what I've come up with so far (clockwise trip)
1. Zion National Park
2. Bryce Canyon
3. Escalante
4. Capitol Reef  National Park
5. San Rafael Swell
6. Arches National Park
7. Moab
8. Canyonlands National Park
9. Monument Valley
10. Antelope Canyon
11. Vermilion Cliffs
12. Grand Canyon North Rim
13. Grand Canyon South Rim
14. Havasu Canyon
15. Grand Canyon Sky Walk
16. Hoover Dam

Suggestions recommendations appreciated!
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #28 on: August 01, 2012, 04:59:01 PM »
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Sounds a bit ambitious, even for a month-long trip. It gives you about two days per destination, including trips between. For instance, GC North Rim and GC South Rim are only 10 miles apart "as the crow flies", but 215 miles by car, about five hours drive. This might be ok for typical tourists, i.e. those who get off the bus/car, look into the canyon, aahh and oohh for the first few minutes, have a picture of them taken, board the bus/car and leave. For a photographer, who needs to be there very early in the morning and has only about a half an hour window around sunset, this would be a logistic nightmare. Besides, not every morning/sunset are worthy, so staying a couple of days in one place usually generates more opportunities to catch a better one.
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Slobodan

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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #29 on: August 01, 2012, 06:54:25 PM »
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Sounds a bit ambitious, even for a month-long trip. It gives you about two days per destination, including trips between. For instance, GC North Rim and GC South Rim are only 10 miles apart "as the crow flies", but 215 miles by car, about five hours drive. This might be ok for typical tourists, i.e. those who get off the bus/car, look into the canyon, aahh and oohh for the first few minutes, have a picture of them taken, board the bus/car and leave. For a photographer, who needs to be there very early in the morning and has only about a half an hour window around sunset, this would be a logistic nightmare. Besides, not every morning/sunset are worthy, so staying a couple of days in one place usually generates more opportunities to catch a better one.
I kind of figured I would start out on the circular path as a guide w/o any time table. Take time where I want and if in a month I don't finish the circle come back next year to finish it up? Do you think I might be better off just planing on completing the northern half this trip, allowing me to backtrack areas that I want to revisit?
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2012, 06:58:20 PM »
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I kind of figured I would start out on the circular path as a guide w/o any time table. Take time where I want and if in a month I don't finish the circle come back next year to finish it up?...

I hate you Grin
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Slobodan

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NashvilleMike
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« Reply #31 on: August 01, 2012, 09:18:24 PM »
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Well I've had a few days with Laurent Martres books and an atlas here is what I've come up with so far (clockwise trip)
1. Zion National Park
2. Bryce Canyon
3. Escalante
4. Capitol Reef  National Park
5. San Rafael Swell
6. Arches National Park
7. Moab
8. Canyonlands National Park
9. Monument Valley
10. Antelope Canyon
11. Vermilion Cliffs
12. Grand Canyon North Rim
13. Grand Canyon South Rim
14. Havasu Canyon
15. Grand Canyon Sky Walk
16. Hoover Dam

Suggestions recommendations appreciated!
Marc

Couple of thoughts:

a) Skip 11 - instead, from Page, heading to the N. Rim, take 89 to Kanab, and stop at the Rimrock Hoodoo's along the way for early evening light - you'll only be 45 minutes or so out of Kanab, and a few hours from the North Rim. Vastly more interesting, IMO, than the Vermillion Cliffs.

b) If you want to add someplace I hear is really neat, from Vegas, drive up to Cedar City, the head across the hill on hwy 14, stopping at Cedar Breaks National Monument at the top, then continue down over to 89 and your choice of Bryce or Zion - as a start. I wasn't able to get here on my last trip since 14 was closed, but everyone has told me this is a "don't skip this even if you're doing Bryce" place.

I also forgot to add that the drive from where hwy 128 meets at 191 in Moab (right before the entrance to Arches - it's in the books) and then north out to the Fisher Towers area (and slightly beyond) is magical in the early evening light. You won't believe the reds the rock gets there when the sun gets low. Clip-your-red-channel-city. There's also the lasal mountain loop drive, which starts from around there, which I haven't done yet.

-m
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Les Sparks
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« Reply #32 on: August 02, 2012, 02:48:15 PM »
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Cedar Breaks is really worth the stop. The colors are vivid at sunset.
There are some nice easy hikes that get you to great views.
When you drive from the North Rim to the South Rim stop at Navajo Bridge. If you're lucky, you'll get up close to the California Condor. I got a good view but no photo of one when we were there. The ranger told us that the birds like to hang out near the bridge.
I think the bottom line for this part of the US is that you can't go too far wrong no matter where you go.
Les

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nma
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« Reply #33 on: August 02, 2012, 03:35:19 PM »
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Since you are committed to photography, you will need to prioritize your list. You can't do it all. The problem is that even clutching Martres in your teeth, you are not going to find the better places to set up your camera on your first try. Some of these places are really big. In the dark, before dawn, you won't have a chance. This means you either have to do a lot of scouting prior to your shoot or hire an experienced photographer-guide.  

A place like Mesa Arch can be done easily: You drive into the parking lot before dawn and follow the path up and over the hill, down the cliff till you approach the canyon and the Arch. There may be 30 or 40 others there, too. Don't let that stop you. Even without a camera, sunrise at Mesa Arch is a thrill. Even if you are alone, it is not evident where best to set your camera on your first visit.

A place like the Windows section of Arches is very confusing to first timers. Where to set up? Can you really climb up there safely? In the dark? Get the idea?

The Moab area is vast, with many really great spots to shoot. You should consider a photographer guide if you can afford it. Someone like Jon Fuller knows when and where. Especially in a rented SUV, you don't want to be traveling in the dark on some of the dirt roads (ruts) that lead to the best spots. You won't even know when you pass the spot you are looking for. And some of the lesser known but exceptional spots require off road travel in the dark.

If I were you, I would cut my list back to concentrate on the most popular areas: Zion (3 days), Bryce (2 days), Moab (10 days), Monument Valley (2 days), South Rim of the Grand Canyon (5 days). They are most popular for a reason. They also lend themselves to the less fit photographer. A short walk, often on a well defined path, gets you to the sight. Don't worry that it is an icon, already done a billion times; everyday is different, different lighting, whether, time of day, etc. You will have a blast. You could then fill in your time with some of the other spots on your list.

Rte 12 between Bryce Canyon and Capital Reef is arguably the most scenic road in the US. There are many photogenic dirt roads  state parks, and National Monuments (Kodachrome Basin). In September you may get the Aspen in full color near Calf Creek State Park ( and a 2-3 hour round trip hike to the falls would be good too.)

Moab deserves special attention. Less famous among us Americans than, say, the Grand Canyon, it deserves to be better known. You have already read in Martres about the variety of landscapes, the petroglyphs and pictographs, Fisher Towers, the Colorado River, etc. Pay special attention to Dead Horse  Point State Park, just 15 miles out of Moab. It is made for you, an older gentleman :-) traveling alone. It is easy to get to thrilling overlooks, but they are not right off the paved paths. You have to do your homework and spend a couple of hours walking along the edge of the Canyon, so you know where you want to be for sunrise.

Just a few miles from DHP is the entrance to the Island In the Sky area of Canyon Lands. Among the points not to miss are Mesa Arch, the Green River Overlook, etc. I already mentioned sunrise at Mesa Arch but generally you need only walk around these areas to be rewarded by fantastic photo ops, but you can't expect to drive up and have a successful shoot without considerable preparation.

There are many examples of Indian petroglyphs and pictographs that are accessible. Many are easy to find and some of those have been vandalized; others are known to the local photo-guides.

Monument Valley is special, too. The home of Navajo Indians, only a small portion is accessible without a guide.  

Have a great time and PM me if you need specific info.
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camilla
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« Reply #34 on: August 03, 2012, 11:45:51 AM »
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i totally second nma's suggestions except I think that you can cut days in Moab and at the South Rim. You can always return if you want more photos of those locations. I think that the travel portfolio needs more variety of scenery and color.

Even if a month seems a long time, it really is not with the itinerary you have built for yourself. The extraordinary places will (hopefully) still be around for the second trip you talked about...since you have the option of another trip then...

why don't you choose an area and do it comfortably and with a more certain success in photography! I have a second home in Sedona and use it a "a Base" and travel extensively throughout the Southwest-- even so, having returned last night from a 4 day trip to the Page area-- there were no hotels available, many roads (Cottonwood) closed and so forth and so on. Rain at sunset so one needs to wait another day...You can book in advance a hotel but maybe you are enthralled in an area which you don';t want to leave to get to the hotel you booked...

i would cut the trip in half at best. Look through Laurent's books, and the internet and decide on which are THE most important sites for you. Give yourself several days in an area-- and I mean several. in Page alone two weeks would not be enough for the variety you would want to photograph even without walking a lot.
I recommend highly Jackson Bridges from Overland Tours to take you to specific places in that area-- Alstrom Point (by jeep, no walking), Canyon X etc etc (928)608 4072
for Monument Valley Daniel Chee of Daniel's Guided Tours (435)7273227 and danielsguidedtours@gmail.com
When in the Monument Valley area don't miss Muley Point for sunrise or sunset. (sunrise is better) the place is extraordinary and has infinite photographic opportunities without much walking and that Moki Dugway also has great photo opportunities at the right time.
There are also a lot of less traveled places in between that you can visit and do not require walking-- Coal Mine Canyon off Tuba City, Coral Pink Sand Dunes between Bryce and Kanab etc

I totally agree with the comments about scouting a location-- that is the real deal, an absolute necessity, as otherwise you won't get the feel of the place, least of all take a great photograph. I've been to the Fisher Towers ten times at least and still want that great photo of the reflection in the river... The fact is that he weather does not always help you get what you want-- plus the distances are huge.

What I personally love the most in the Southwest is to contemplate the beauty and magic of the places. Nothing beats that. If you are rushed, you might miss it...
if you want the great photos you really need to wait for the light, sunrise and sunset and scouting in between. The rest of the day is not suitable for photography except taking a photo to remind you of somewhere you want to return to. The light is too harsh and everything looks washed out.

on a second trip you can potentially do Route 12, the Escalante, Capitol Reef National Park (Amazing place)The Burr Trail, Goblin Valley, Rafael Swell etc , and continue to Colorado. Just a suggestion.
 
Another comment which relates to my first about Moab and the South Rim-- I would include Page in your first trip itinerary because if you concentrate a lot on Moab and Monument Valley, the photos will end up being rather heavy on Red Rocks! Page will give you as much variety as you would want, water, Antelope, Toadstools, etc etc....  Horseshoe Bend is not a long walk-- just lighten up on the equipment. I would include Zion and Bryce for the same reason. That way you have a diverse portfolio.
Just my two cents....
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« Reply #35 on: August 05, 2012, 11:06:14 AM »
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Laurent Martres "Photographing the Southwest" book is an excellent resource.  Some other good resources/guides to photographing the southwest include:

John Annerino's The Photographer's Guide to Canyon Country
Robert Hitchman's Photograph America newsletters - The Southwest Collection
iFotoGuide - Grand Canyon (for iPhone users)
And, my own e-book, The Essential Guide to Photographing Arches National Park

Good luck, and have a great trip!
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #36 on: August 07, 2012, 03:37:41 PM »
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Between Brice and Moab is it better to take Rts 12 & 24 or Hwy 70?
Thanks
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
nma
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« Reply #37 on: August 07, 2012, 07:03:02 PM »
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Between Brice and Moab is it better to take Rts 12 & 24 or Hwy 70?
Thanks
Marc

Marc,

Rte 12 traverses the Grand Staircase Escalante. It is arguably the most scenic highway in the USA. Don't miss it.
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marcmccalmont
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« Reply #38 on: August 07, 2012, 09:11:45 PM »
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Rt 12 it is!

Another question on lenses...................

My Landscape "kit" is as follows:
 for wide FOV; IQ180/WRS and 40mm, 70mm T/S and 105mm T/S Rodenstock HR's
 primarily for narrow FOV on a tripod but sometimes for long hikes, dusty conditions, casual shots; D800E with?
 1. Normal zoom either Leica 28-90 (highest IQ) or Tamron 24-70 (stabilized) very good IQ
 2. Long zoom eithe Leica 180 3.4 and 280 4.0 (highest IQ) or Nikkor 70-200 VR and 1.7x (stabilized) very good IQ

which would you take the Highest IQ lenses that require a tripod or the stabilized lenses for those instances where your hand held, wildlife etc?

Thanks
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
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« Reply #39 on: August 08, 2012, 12:04:16 AM »
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Oh and who would be a good tour company for Monument valley / North coyote buttes?
Marc
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Marc McCalmont
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