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Author Topic: The Palouse region...  (Read 2599 times)
framah
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« on: August 06, 2012, 02:11:09 PM »
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Hi all..

I have been thinking of heading out to the Palouse region but only later in the year... around the end of October first week of November. Has anyone been out there at that time? Is it worth it or is it too late in the season for colorful stuff.

You know... like .. would I get caught in a snowstorm or what?

Thanks for any info.
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degrub
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« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2012, 02:23:00 PM »
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http://www.wunderground.com/q/zmw:99001.3.99999

scroll down to History and Almanac to get the historical weather.
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2012, 07:01:06 PM »
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Without consulting anything but my memory of visits there, I'd say "too late".  The fields, while still shapely, will be harvested and bare.  You could get lucky with stormy weather, though.  The earlier you can push it, the better, I'd say.
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Vladimir Steblina
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« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2012, 05:01:45 PM »
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Hi all..

I have been thinking of heading out to the Palouse region but only later in the year... around the end of October first week of November. Has anyone been out there at that time? Is it worth it or is it too late in the season for colorful stuff.

You know... like .. would I get caught in a snowstorm or what?

Thanks for any info.


I have spent the end of October shooting in the Palouse for over a decade now.  Never had snow, until the middle of November.  You could get a couple of windy days. 

Are you going to be camping or do you know where you will be staying?  The COE campgrounds are closed by that time.  There are a couple of private campgrounds still open in Starbuck.  Or you can just camp at the COE access areas. 

Be aware that in October almost all hunting seasons are open.  Deer season is a long-range affair so be sure to wear hunter orange when your shooting.  At minimum get an Orange baseball cap, but I would also get a orange vest. 

By mid_November it is highly likely that you will get some skiff's of snow.  The Palouse and Snake River country are really one unit.  The Snake River country is fairly low elevation so you can get out towards Walla Walla fairly easily.  By that time of year the day length is fairly short, so you will have plenty of time to process your photo's.

Here are a couple of my blog postings on the area:  http://usbackroads.blogspot.com/2010/11/little-goose-dam-starbuck-washington.html

Last year, there was a new dog in town:  http://usbackroads.blogspot.com/2011/11/unleashing-inner-dog.html

and more info on the Invasive Species Project:  http://usbackroads.blogspot.com/2011/11/snake-river-invasive-avian-species.html

As you have probably noticed almost all my shooting was with a 20 gauge side by side.  But the light is pretty good this time of year.  The big disadvantage is that it is either clear or cloudy.   So there are not many days with nice clouds effects.

Hope that gives you some more info.  Feel free to contact me through the blog if you need more information.
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neile
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« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2012, 10:38:59 PM »
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If you're after the classic rolling hills of crops, either in green or brown and ready for harvest, you'll be far too late I'm afraid Sad

Neil
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framah
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« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2012, 02:03:46 PM »
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Actually, Neil, i was also thinking of what they might look like AFTER all that. Somehow, i think there should still be  more subtle colors and patterns in the hills after the harvest. Not exactly sure what I'm visualizing  in my addled little brain, but it might be interesting to  take a look at the area anyhow. Know what i mean?
I figure, if it's a bust, I can always head on south to the redrock area of the South West for a sure thing.

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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2012, 04:50:51 PM »
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I'd love to see some images from the Palouse at other than the usual snappy season. I say go for it, and show us what you get.
New England cornfields can be very interesting "off season," so I suspect the Palouse would, too.
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Vladimir Steblina
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« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2012, 08:43:43 PM »
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Actually, Neil, i was also thinking of what they might look like AFTER all that. Somehow, i think there should still be  more subtle colors and patterns in the hills after the harvest. Not exactly sure what I'm visualizing  in my addled little brain, but it might be interesting to  take a look at the area anyhow. Know what i mean?
I figure, if it's a bust, I can always head on south to the redrock area of the South West for a sure thing.



There are always opportunities for photographs.  Where there is winter wheat planted you will have the green versus harvested fields, however, fall is just a different time.

If you want to try something different.  Just west of the Palouse is the area impacted by the Great Floods.  It is a VERY interesting landscape and hardly ever photographed from a fine art perspective.

I have various posts on this area:  http://usbackroads.blogspot.com/2010/09/swanson-lakes-wildlife-area-odessa.html  AND here is the background information on how the area was created:  http://usbackroads.blogspot.com/2010/04/seep-lakes-othello-washington.html

This blog on the ice age floods also has pictures: http://iceagefloods.blogspot.com/

It is a much more interesting landscape than the Palouse and is just west of the area.  Hardly anybody has done any photography that does it justice. 

My own wanderings in the area have been focused on fishing and hunting rather than photography.  The light in September and early October is perfect for photography. 

Do click on the iceagefloods blogspot.com above and check out his photographs.  They are "science" photos.  But you will get the drift.

Give it a try and if you find some guy wandering around with a shotgun and a German Longhair Pointer or fishing gear stop and say hi.  I would love to see photo's of this area from other photographers.
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framah
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« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2012, 10:20:03 AM »
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Sorry for not getting back sooner. I just wanted to say thanks for all of the good help.

I'm still not sure if I'm gonna drive on out there but it is at the top of my list.
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Msphoto
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« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2012, 06:31:18 PM »
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I went down a couple years ago in January to see what the Palouse looked like in snow.
It was c c c cold, but there were some nice opportunities too. Some amazing countryside.
Here's a link to a few shots. The wagon wheel fence is in a place called Uniontown.
http://www.msphoto.ca/Palouse_slideshow.html
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