Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: « 1 [2] 3 4 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: 44" Canon ipf8300 - best price I've ever seen  (Read 12830 times)
billbunton
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 23


« Reply #20 on: August 16, 2012, 05:38:42 AM »
ReplyReply

Interesting that the rebates have been going on since the beginning of the month.  I was looking at Atlex about a week ago, and someone there started a chat with me.  I said I was waiting for rebates to appear on the 8300 before purchasing one, and the only response I got was "OK".  Guess it's about time to order from IT Supplies!
Logged
TSJ1927
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 90



WWW
« Reply #21 on: August 16, 2012, 09:42:45 PM »
ReplyReply

Besides the $2000.00 in ink you are also getting 2 new Heads ($900.00+)!................just buy the printer and use the consumables .............. save the chassis for major breakdowns (belts, mainboard, etc.)
This is crazy.
Logged
bill t.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2693


WWW
« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2012, 10:27:39 PM »
ReplyReply

But don't forget the shipping, and the time spent in receiving and handling, and storing the rather large printer body.  And winding up with two obsolete printers carcasses a few years down the road.  And there are other issues having to do with parts compatibility due to manufacturing revisions, etc.  It actually involves quite a bit of effort, and after thinking about it I decided not to go that route.

And I really think Canon should reward me for that attitude by sending me a free iPF9400 for testing.  Yoohoo...Canon!  I'm available!
Logged
Rob Reiter
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 229



WWW
« Reply #23 on: August 17, 2012, 10:46:12 AM »
ReplyReply

Yeah, Jim. what would a person in your position know?  :-)


HMM Lets see.. The last time These units where this low was when they where the 8100 Series..Sounds and Smells Like a x400 Series This fall..

But Than again What Do I Know  Wink Roll Eyes Shocked

Cheers
Jim Doyle
Shades Of Paper
Logged

http://www.lightroom.com Fine art printing for photographers and other artists
BarbaraArmstrong
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 288


« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2012, 01:43:26 PM »
ReplyReply

The nice price on the ipf8300 (even though I don't have a trade-in) is making me think whether this is a good time to take the plunge on a large-format printer.  My concern (or at least one of them) is the comment Bill T. has made a couple of times in other threads about the need to tweak one's edited photo files when moving from Epson to Canon.  This has stuck in the back of my mind.  What is the problem, and what is necessary?  My prints match what I see on-screen, and have been printed on the Epson 2200 (years ago), the 3880, 4900, and the R3000.  I use Photoshop CS5, processing raw files first in ACR, then some additional editing if necessary in Photoshop.  Doesn't an ICC-managed work-flow yield the same results on a Canon?  I really don't want to have to re-edit files I'm already happy with.  What would I expect with a change in printer brand? 

As additional information, I am attracted to the Canon because I don't print a lot and don't want a going-crazy experience with clogs that won't clear and large amounts of wasted ink.  The downside of the Canon is that I prefer printing on cut sheets when I can to avoid having to deal with curl.  I've watched a video on loading cut-sheets in the Canon and think I can deal with that, especially as I am not printing large volumes.    Advice would be appreciated, especially as to any need to re-work photo files.  --Barbara
Logged
neile
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1095


WWW
« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2012, 02:17:12 PM »
ReplyReply

In terms of cut sheets, be aware that on the 8300 the minimum trailing end margin is larger than the other three. This will pose problems if you're trying to print 8x10 on 8.5x11" paper, for example.

Neil
Logged

Neil Enns
Dane Creek Folio Covers. Limited edition Tuscan Sun and Citron covers are now in stock!
Ernst Dinkla
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 2842


« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2012, 02:22:19 PM »
ReplyReply


What is the problem, and what is necessary?  My prints match what I see on-screen, and have been printed on the Epson 2200 (years ago), the 3880, 4900, and the R3000.  I use Photoshop CS5, processing raw files first in ACR, then some additional editing if necessary in Photoshop.  Doesn't an ICC-managed work-flow yield the same results on a Canon?  I really don't want to have to re-edit files I'm already happy with.  What would I expect with a change in printer brand?  


Barbara,

The printer profile describes the gamut of the printer/media combination and when the gamut is increased or changes shape between successive printer generations the printer profiles will do the same. Depending on the CM rendering intent you used in the past and will use in the future your prints will change towards the new printer gamut. If you did not experience that with the changes from the 2200 up to the 4900 + R3000 then it will likely not be an issue either in this case. You could also do some proofs on an 8300 to see what happens. Gamut increase is progress in printer land. Cross rendered proofing and profiles created for that purpose could recreate the original Epson gamut on the Canon if the Canon gamut extends on all the boundaries of the Epson gamut. Whether that is worth the effort in your case remains a question.


--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

340+ paper white spectral plots:
http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
update july 2012: Moab changes, paper sorting by name


Logged
bill t.
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2693


WWW
« Reply #27 on: August 17, 2012, 02:26:12 PM »
ReplyReply

The problem was not going from Epson to Canon per se.  The problem was moving to a printer/media combination that had a somewhat wider gamut of colors than the previous one.

For instance, the 12 ink Canon can print colors around blue and red with much better saturation and accuracy than the old 8 ink Epson.  Not that the Epson could not make beautiful prints!  Colors that I had pumped to limits of the 9880's gamut and otherwise tweaked to "come through" looking nice, came through howling like a banshee on the 8300!  Whoa, where did that blue come from!  And how 'bout those reds!  It was just a matter of toning down the printer files a little bit.  But since I was doing all that during a seasonal printing crunch, it had a bigger impact than it might have otherwise.  And since nothing is more fun than complaining, I did!

A comparable thing is taking the same printing file from a subtle, low gamut matte paper or canvas to a much louder glossy paper or canvas.  Certain more extreme colors that can print accurately within the gamut on the glossy media will have areas significantly out of gamut (ie. color clipped) on the matte media, and the best possible matte print will be made by toning down or shifting those colors a bit.  Which is best done by soft proofing with a few test strips thrown in.

So anytime you change media types on the same printer, or move between printers with significantly different gamuts you need to do some file tweaking.  And that's the way it is in Inkjet Land.

Anyhoo, no piece of equipment has earned my love and affection more easily than the 8300, except for maybe the refrigerator.  It's so easy going compared to the 9880 or any of its predecessors.  Cheers.

Edit...I left something out.  When you find yourself in a situation where a wider gamut media or printer can offer more colors than the previous venue, you also have the option to push the printed image into areas it could not go before.  So you have to ask yourself, do I want to maintain the same look as before, or go for a more dramatic rendition of the image than before.  I go for the gold, every time.

« Last Edit: August 17, 2012, 02:43:05 PM by bill t. » Logged
BarbaraArmstrong
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 288


« Reply #28 on: August 17, 2012, 03:23:20 PM »
ReplyReply

Wow.  Thank you for the replies, Neil, Ernst, and Bill.  I do understand gamut, and don't offhand remember the difference between the two major rendering intents, but for what it's worth, I have always used relative colorimetric with black point compensation (I did know the difference at the time I made the choice for relative colorimetric).  What I could probably figure out if I wrapped my head around it, but you may know right off the top, Ernst, is whether that choice will tend to give me more or fewer issues when I make a change.  And actually, I don't do that many reprints to worry me unduly.  I can do any edits that are needed.  The comments about the edits, Ernst and Bill, helped tremendously, and gave me less to worry about.  Now I know what to look for.  Any increased gamut I can appreciate and enjoy and make the necessary adjustments.  I enjoy doing landscapes, and any additional range in the blues would be quite nice.
     Bill, I enjoyed your comment about the refrigerator.  I finally, in my 60's, have a refrigerator I love.  But I love my printers at least as much (no, undoubtedly more).  The thing for me about photography is that it is a multi-part creation, and I love each of the parts -- the capture with the camera, the editing in Photoshop (and I've tried to learn CaptureOne), and the print.  What a joy it all is! -- Barbara
Logged
BillK
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 64



WWW
« Reply #29 on: August 17, 2012, 06:09:01 PM »
ReplyReply

Barbara, if you still have the 3800 or 4900 they qualify for the trade in rebate.
Check out this link>

http://www.proimagingsupplies.com/docs/rebates/canon/may2012/canon-trade-in-2012.pdf
Logged
BillK
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 64



WWW
« Reply #30 on: August 17, 2012, 06:19:37 PM »
ReplyReply

Actually, after looking closer anything epson SP2000 and up qualifies.

So You should be good to go Grin
Logged
jdoyle1713
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 172



WWW
« Reply #31 on: August 17, 2012, 06:49:18 PM »
ReplyReply

Be careful I am under the imPression that to qualify for a trade in the unit has
To be 36" or bIgger

Cheers
Jim Doyle
Shades of Paper
Logged

dwood
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 275



« Reply #32 on: August 17, 2012, 07:47:28 PM »
ReplyReply

<But it would have taken 8 of me, two or three of whom would have died.>

Please don't post something like this when I'm enjoying a beverage...almost exited via my nose <g>.
Logged

BillK
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 64



WWW
« Reply #33 on: August 17, 2012, 10:18:40 PM »
ReplyReply

Be careful I am under the imPression that to qualify for a trade in the unit has
To be 36" or bIgger

Cheers
Jim Doyle
Shades of Paper

Maybe PMSI is wrong but their website clearly states the information I gave before.
Here is a link to the page where you check if your printer qualifies.

http://www.proimagingsupplies.com/Rebates-and-Promotions-32.html

See "Click here to see if your printer qualifies for trade-in savings."
Logged
JeffKohn
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1671



WWW
« Reply #34 on: August 17, 2012, 11:37:38 PM »
ReplyReply

Be careful I am under the imPression that to qualify for a trade in the unit has
To be 36" or bIgger

Cheers
Jim Doyle
Shades of Paper
I used an Epson 2400 to get the trade-in instant rebate on a new 8300 a couple months ago.
Logged

Ernst Dinkla
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 2842


« Reply #35 on: August 18, 2012, 03:15:07 AM »
ReplyReply

I have always used relative colorimetric with black point compensation (I did know the difference at the time I made the choice for relative colorimetric).  What I could probably figure out if I wrapped my head around it, but you may know right off the top, Ernst, is whether that choice will tend to give me more or fewer issues when I make a change. 

Barbara,

Suppose you used relative colormetric and AdobeRGB for the image's color space, it would give less changes than either sRGB and ProPhoto and perceptual rendering. Based on the assumption that AdobeRGB is somewhere in the middle of the printer's gamuts we discuss here. If you want to use the Canon's gamut optimal with new strong  images you may consider switching to ProPhoto.


--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

340+ paper white spectral plots:
http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
update july 2012: Moab changes, paper sorting by name
Logged
BarbaraArmstrong
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 288


« Reply #36 on: August 18, 2012, 01:54:04 PM »
ReplyReply

Ernst, thank you for your additional comments.  I forgot to mention that I am already using the ProPhoto space for the raw conversion and editing in Photoshop/ACR.  I should add that I always enjoy reading your posts on the variety of subjects you feel inclined to respond to.  Thanks again. --Barbara
Logged
Johnny_Boy
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 133


« Reply #37 on: August 18, 2012, 02:58:42 PM »
ReplyReply

But don't forget the shipping, and the time spent in receiving and handling, and storing the rather large printer body.  And winding up with two obsolete printers carcasses a few years down the road.  And there are other issues having to do with parts compatibility due to manufacturing revisions, etc.  It actually involves quite a bit of effort, and after thinking about it I decided not to go that route.

And I really think Canon should reward me for that attitude by sending me a free iPF9400 for testing.  Yoohoo...Canon!  I'm available!

I decided to go down the same route as well. It will cost me a few hundred bucks more to buy the full set of ink and replacement heads, but I do not have to sink all the money up front, so I get better cash flow, plus I do not have to worry about throwing the entire printer away somehow. Bill and others who are using high volume have had no problem with the printer itself, so I am going to stick with that plan. I do low volume, and so far it has worked great for me. None of these clogging head problem that Epson guys see when they do not use if frequently. (I do art shows, so I print a lot in a batch, then it sits around for about a month before next large volume gets printed)
Logged
deanwork
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 710


« Reply #38 on: August 18, 2012, 04:17:24 PM »
ReplyReply

Those prices are unbelievable. What a deal.  I really don't see anything they could improve over the 8300. But I make my own profiles with X-Rite.

The Canon does more cleanings than the HP but no where near what you have to do with my Epson. In both cases the ink carts face down and drain pretty much all of it.

Logged
Miles
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 53


« Reply #39 on: August 19, 2012, 12:02:31 PM »
ReplyReply

I am strongly considering purchasing one of these printers.  I have owned an HP Z3100 for about 5 years and have had zero maintenance issues other than I replaced a few print heads.  My printing is sporadic, thus I need a printer that can sit for long periods without clog issues.  The HP has been a champ at this and from what I read above the Canon is pretty good as well.  I do have a few questions though.

My understanding is that the Canon has a maintenance tank.  How often does this need to be changed?

I leave the Z3100 on all the time.  Ink usage during self cleanings seem to be minimal.  How much ink does the Canon use?   Do you leave it on all the time as well?

Even though the HP ink cartridges are relatively small compared to the Canon, the cost per ml is quite good (comparatively speaking) if you buy the HP 2 pack.  Actually, it appears to be less per ml than the Canon 300ml cartridge.  One must move up to the Canon 700ml to match the per ml cost.  This concerns me a little since I often have cartridges that the printer indicates have expired (I have continued to use them without problems) before they are completely used up.  Do Canon cartridges expire as well?  Can they continue to be used?  Will this void the head warranty? 

Lastly, the Z3100 software seemed to work better on the old windows xp than the current windows 7.  I believe Ernst has commented on this in the past.  Are there any software issues I should be aware of or concerned about with the Canon?

Thanks in advance for any advise you all can offer.
Logged
Pages: « 1 [2] 3 4 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad