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Author Topic: Asleep, tired, or she malingers. . .  (Read 1605 times)
RSL
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« on: August 18, 2012, 03:58:35 PM »
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For those who know Prufrock.

This is another one I keep coming back to -- from last month.

Those aren't split cutoffs. That's a tattoo on that leg.
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Rob C
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2012, 03:47:51 AM »
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For those who know Prufrock.

This is another one I keep coming back to -- from last month.

Those aren't split cutoffs. That's a tattoo on that leg.




And her pose shows the regret.

Rob C
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2012, 02:03:34 PM »
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An awfully heavy weight on such young shoulders.

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
~ Jean Cooke ~


My Flickr site / Random Thoughts and Other Meanderings at M&M's Musings
RobbieV
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2012, 02:28:41 PM »
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An awfully heavy weight on such young shoulders.

Mike.

Is it a hangover from late night alcohol fueled adventures, or one from a drunken heart?
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WalterEG
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2012, 05:30:48 PM »
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Frankly, I don't see regret here.  The tattoos, the hairstyle and the attire indicate to me that this is a matter of introspection and cutting off from the world around.  These kids are possibly the first since the 1960s that revel in a conformity of non-conformity.  Penny for her thoughts.

(Just don't spend the penny on more ink, please!)

W
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RSL
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« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2012, 08:17:12 PM »
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It's not as bad as some of the kids I see with tattoos all over their faces and necks. I'm sure they don't understand why they can't get a job at McDonald's.
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John R
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« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2012, 08:26:55 PM »
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It's a great shot. But like Walter, I wouldn't read too much into it. So sharp and the set up draws you right into the whole image.

JMR
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WalterEG
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« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2012, 02:45:13 AM »
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I am so sorry,

I neglected to say that I found the tonality of this photo simply luscious.

W
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Rob C
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« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2012, 03:14:22 AM »
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I am so sorry,

I neglected to say that I found the tonality of this photo simply luscious.

W



You see what a special camera can do for you? All those years of practice had nothing at all to do with it!

Actually, it's just a cheap photographic trick: you shoot something like the disfigured leg and then everything else in the shot that meets the eye is a blessed relief from the original shock! It's a con, I tell you, it's a con...!

Yep, there is something about black and white that still has a superior look about it when well done; almost as nice here as if done on my favourite, glazed, WSG 2D!

I also think that that sort of 'luscious' feel is never really accomplished using colour. Why? Not sure, but I think it could be that the colours fight one another for visual supremacy, resulting in a diminishing of the whole, just like some posters manage to achieve on some other threads.

Rob C
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RSL
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« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2012, 11:18:06 AM »
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You see what a special camera can do for you? All those years of practice had nothing at all to do with it!

Nothing really special about the D800, Rob, just more pixels. It has controls so similar to the controls on my D3 that I didn't really need to read the manual, though I did, having come from an Air Force background where you always had to RTFI to avoid an untimely end. It was pure chance that I had the D800 on that day. I'd been doing some landscape and I went down town still carrying the D800. Usually, when I'm down there, I'm still shooting with my D3 or E-P1 with Summilux.

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Yep, there is something about black and white that still has a superior look about it when well done; almost as nice here as if done on my favourite, glazed, WSG 2D!

I also think that that sort of 'luscious' feel is never really accomplished using colour. Why? Not sure, but I think it could be that the colours fight one another for visual supremacy, resulting in a diminishing of the whole, just like some posters manage to achieve on some other threads.

Depends on the subject. Where graphics and geometry are paramount you can’t beat monochrome, but I’d be very disappointed had Albert Bierstadt painted his nineteenth-century views of the Rocky mountains in monochrome.

HCB’s comments on the subject agree, at least in part, with what you’re saying. Not the “luscious” part, though. What he points out is that in photography, unlike in painting, it’s difficult and sometimes impossible to control the relationships between colors. The immutable rules of color don’t go away in photography: complementary colors next to each other increase their vibrancy; analogous colors blend and tend to create serenity; colors, such as red and orange seem to advance toward you, colors such as greens and blues seem to recede, etc., etc. Fortunately, with digital photography and Photoshop we have infinitely more control over these things than we had with film.
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Wim van Velzen
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« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2012, 01:59:45 AM »
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The subject matter is certainly intriguing - and the composition does take it further than just curiosity arousing. Thanks for posting!

[ Why is it that we see so many tattoos these days? Is it a way to have a more permanent, non digital possibility to create a new self image? ]
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WalterEG
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« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2012, 03:05:48 AM »
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[ Why is it that we see so many tattoos these days? Is it a way to have a more permanent, non digital possibility to create a new self image? ]

Why indeed.  And in my field of nudes why is it that pubic hair is so seldom present?

Funny days,

W
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Rob C
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« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2012, 04:20:20 AM »
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Why indeed.  And in my field of nudes why is it that pubic hair is so seldom present?

Funny days,

W



Pubic hair used to be a legal no-no in photographs in the 50s (and probably earlier, too) and it might be that today's young ladies carry a trace memory of that in their subconscious... For myself, I never felt that a display of either the hair or what lies beneath contributed usefully to a beautiful picture. As with so much, what's not shown is sometimes best left unshown. I feel the same way about nudes of both (all?) sexes: nothing inside the crotch of the Kleins is worth the revealing.

But be thankful that those same young women don't arrive at your studios wearing an old-fashioned blur; defeat the autofocus at once.

Rob C
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