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Author Topic: Nice find  (Read 701 times)
Robert Roaldi
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« on: August 19, 2012, 10:12:34 AM »
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http://vimeo.com/47283206
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Robert
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Rob C
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« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2012, 10:59:30 AM »
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Some good, some bad, but at least he's doing something.

Which raises the question (no begging here) of why? That's always the big one, in my opinion; you/one/anyone/everyone really should have a reason that's better than 'just because I want to!' which doesn't exactly illuminate the viewer's mind.

This might well be no more than a throwback to pro days, but I again find myself thinking of Terence Donovan's famous quote that, more or less, says: the most difficult thing for an amateur is findng a reason for making a photograph. It's exactly the worst thing that I face now as an amateur; all the driving purpose has vanished and not a heap of good reasons remains for doing the work involved.  In some ways, snapping for 'fun' reminds me of a headless chicken just after it's been semi-executed: they leap all over the place, going nowhere.

Rob C
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Robert Roaldi
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« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2012, 11:10:30 AM »
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I have no axe to grind here, I found this video by random chance. I thought it was an interesting exercise to force oneself to take an interesting photo (maybe only to themselves) every day for that length of time. Like all such exercises (e.g., limiting yourself to a normal lens), it's a way to see if artificial limitation can focus the mind, not to sound too pretentious about it.  But if your questions are not rhetorical, my only answer is the following. When I was 20 or 30, I worried about why. I'm now 59 and "just because I like it" is more than good enough for my wanting to take a picture or to look at one, and even to buy one. I don't feel as if I need anyone else's permission or approval for my choices. I think maybe you worry too much!
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Rob C
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2012, 04:57:57 PM »
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I have no axe to grind here, I found this video by random chance. I thought it was an interesting exercise to force oneself to take an interesting photo (maybe only to themselves) every day for that length of time. Like all such exercises (e.g., limiting yourself to a normal lens), it's a way to see if artificial limitation can focus the mind, not to sound too pretentious about it.  But if your questions are not rhetorical, my only answer is the following. When I was 20 or 30, I worried about why. I'm now 59 and "just because I like it" is more than good enough for my wanting to take a picture or to look at one, and even to buy one. I don't feel as if I need anyone else's permission or approval for my choices. I think maybe you worry too much!


Robert, you're still a young man; when you reach mid-winter you see things with a little more jaundice in the eye - if you see anything at all.

But, despite my actual chronological situation, I must have the mind of the under-sixty: you've just verbalised my reason for shooting (despite the frustrations of) cellpix!

Unfortunately, worry comes with all the other damned problems that cause it in the first place. Hell, even my pension came with a heart-attack.

;-)

Rob C
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bill t.
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2012, 06:09:29 PM »
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A 300 image slideshow might be interesting if the images somehow segued into each in some way such as by subject, color, shape or whatever, rather than just clicking along randomly.  Once in a while something surprising can emerge out of accidental arrangements, but it's rare.  Wouldn't be surprised if engaging sequences could be assembled from this lot that would add up to something more than just the images.  If that guy was my student, that's what I'd have him do.
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Rob C
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« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2012, 10:54:59 AM »
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A 300 image slideshow might be interesting if the images somehow segued into each in some way such as by subject, color, shape or whatever, rather than just clicking along randomly.   Once in a while something surprising can emerge out of accidental arrangements, but it's rare.  Wouldn't be surprised if engaging sequences could be assembled from this lot that would add up to something more than just the images.  If that guy was my student, that's what I'd have him do.




Well, I'm sure he has some good material with which to start!

I’d begun my own Biscuit Tin gallery with much that idea in mind: a chronicle of my somewhat mundane daily life. What do you want from a creature of habit?

Then, thinking about it, it dawned on me that life doesn’t come along in neat and packaged doses – that’s medication – and that you have to take it as it presents itself. The next thing that I realised was that planning it ahead of the material (a gallery) takes too long; see below.

http://youtu.be/dGzIjeKynco

So, I abandoned that concept quite soon but did attempt to impose a sense of order, of graphic design in the way that the available shots appear in the contact sheet. For which, of course, you require a contact sheet.

In the end, the important thing is to continue shooting something that tickles your fancy, and problems arise when there’s nothing left that tickles. As someone wrote – I think it was Robert Roaldi – I might worry too much. Of course, I can’t know this because I can only be me as I am at any one time, even though I might have frequent changes of mind, but with each change I encounter total belief in the new position. Flexible… ever open to new stimulants, despite the existing habits that maketh the creature, as mentioned above.

Rob C



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