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Author Topic: Morning light....Grandes Jorasses  (Read 1539 times)
shaunw
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« on: August 20, 2012, 04:24:20 AM »
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I started climbing in the Swiss/French Alps 10 yrs ago my interest in photography was initially driven by my Alpine climbing experiences, this time i took a decent camera/tripod instead of a compact stuffed down my smock and the focus was on photography not climbing...WDYT?


Morning Light...Grandes Jorrasses. by Shaunwalby Photography, on Flickr
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Canon 5D mk II Sigma 10-20, Canon 17-40mm L, Canon 24-105mm L, Canon 70-200 L, Lee Filters, Manfrotto geared head/tripod.

''Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop''. – Ansel Adams
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francois
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2012, 05:58:23 AM »
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Beautiful photo! It truly shows how spectacular mountains in/near Chamonix are. The Grandes Jorasses massif offers a sense of power and respect. I find it intimidating not unlike the Eiger.

Well done
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Francois
Chris Calohan
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2012, 06:27:08 AM »
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I think you've done quite well. Lovely light.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2012, 07:59:09 AM »
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I think you've done quite well. Lovely light.
+1.
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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2012, 10:37:06 AM »
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The lighting sets off the steep and toothy nature of these mountains. Good one.
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RobbieV
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« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2012, 01:49:56 PM »
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I think you've done well here. Not much else to say. Any other shots to share from the expedition?
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wolfnowl
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« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2012, 01:59:03 PM »
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Looks like a beautiful place to be!

Mike.
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If your mind is attuned to beauty, you find beauty in everything.
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francois
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« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2012, 02:21:40 AM »
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By the way, where did you take it from? I seem to recognise  Aiguille du Grépon and les Grands Charmoz on the right of mer de Glace.
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Francois
shaunw
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« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2012, 02:27:40 PM »
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Thanks for comments.....Francois i see your familiar with the area, yes there is a fair bit of classic Alpine mountain on display... the Grandes Jorasses 4208m (one of the most famous European Alpine mountains in the world as well as....Roachford Ridge variable around 4000m, Dent Du Geant 4013m (i climbed in 06), Charmoz 3445m and petit Charmoz 2395, the Grepon 3482m and the think the edge of the Nantillons 3507m is just visible. I has bivvied in the Aig Rouges as you can see just to the right of the snout of the Mer du Glace.

regards Shaun
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Canon 5D mk II Sigma 10-20, Canon 17-40mm L, Canon 24-105mm L, Canon 70-200 L, Lee Filters, Manfrotto geared head/tripod.

''Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop''. – Ansel Adams
http://www.shaunwalbyphotography.com
francois
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« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2012, 04:49:16 AM »
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Yes, I'm quite familiar with the region. I live at about 65km from Chamonix (as the crow flies), so getting there is really easy for me.

You have climbed a good number of Aiguilles & Dents, congrats.

The Grandes Jorasses are quite mythical for me. When I was a young kid, I was fascinated by all kinds of drama developed there with climbers getting stuck in winter (ex: René Desmaison/Serge Gousseault attempt in 1971). I can say the same of the north face of the Eiger in Grindelwald/Switzerland.

Getting back to your photo, the more I look at it the more I like it. Mountain photography is not always interesting, probably due to tough conditions, exposure and also because photography takes the second seat behind climbing.

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Francois
shaunw
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« Reply #10 on: August 24, 2012, 03:01:18 PM »
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Yes, I'm quite familiar with the region. I live at about 65km from Chamonix (as the crow flies), so getting there is really easy for me.

You have climbed a good number of Aiguilles & Dents, congrats.

The Grandes Jorasses are quite mythical for me. When I was a young kid, I was fascinated by all kinds of drama developed there with climbers getting stuck in winter (ex: René Desmaison/Serge Gousseault attempt in 1971). I can say the same of the north face of the Eiger in Grindelwald/Switzerland.

Getting back to your photo, the more I look at it the more I like it. Mountain photography is not always interesting, probably due to tough conditions, exposure and also because photography takes the second seat behind climbing.



I think the classic disaster of the Eiger has to be the 1936 epic... Tony Kurz, Hinterstossier and Angerer i allowed that story to permeate my climbing in the alps and on rock in the uk iam convinced it kept me safe for a decade, such fit strong talented climbers and the simple accumulation of growing problems leading to desperate tragic disaster...such a sad end. I agree what you've said about mountain photography, simple turning up in a beautiful mountain environment does not mean easily gain beautiful shots, in reflection i was a little surprised by how hard i had to work to get the decent stuff.

Regards Shaun
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Canon 5D mk II Sigma 10-20, Canon 17-40mm L, Canon 24-105mm L, Canon 70-200 L, Lee Filters, Manfrotto geared head/tripod.

''Twelve significant photographs in any one year is a good crop''. – Ansel Adams
http://www.shaunwalbyphotography.com
francois
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« Reply #11 on: August 26, 2012, 05:01:24 AM »
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I think the classic disaster of the Eiger has to be the 1936 epic... Tony Kurz, Hinterstossier and Angerer i allowed that story to permeate my climbing in the alps and on rock in the uk iam convinced it kept me safe for a decade, such fit strong talented climbers and the simple accumulation of growing problems leading to desperate tragic disaster...such a sad end.

You're correct about the Eiger. The tragic end of the 1936 climb played a big role. British climber Joe Simpson has written a book and produced a nice TV documentary. The book is available everywhere but I only have the french version of the TV doc. In the days of Ueli Steck's speed climb (less than 3 hours) of the north face of Eiger, everything seems now so easy but in the 60's, I still remember how tourists gathered in Kleine Scheidegg with binoculars to watch climbers deal with "death" (as the tourists said).

I agree what you've said about mountain photography, simple turning up in a beautiful mountain environment does not mean easily gain beautiful shots, in reflection i was a little surprised by how hard i had to work to get the decent stuff.

Regards Shaun

I'm also struggling to produce outstanding shots in the Alps but some others have mastered the craft very well. If you happen to be in Chamonix and haven't been visiting Mario Colonel's gallery (website) or Famille Tairraz's store (website), then consider a stop there. It's really worth it.

Happy climbing & shooting

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Francois
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